Children in Troubled Worlds Conference 2009 – programme page

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 25th, 2009

EVENT DATE: SEPTEMBER 25, 2009
St Antony’s College, Oxford

Children in Troubled Worlds Conference 2008

‘between the words’

The eighth Children in Troubled Worlds’ conference was a unique experience. Two Oxford based poets, Tom Paulin and Bernard O’Donoghue offered a poetry masterclass,exploring the evocation of meaning in and between words in poetry.

Pamela Sorensen presented a paper on exploring aspects of learning from Dr Meltzer in person and in his writing with reference to the film The Story of the Weeping Camel.  Attendees were encouraged to view this film before the conference. Additional speakers included Meg Harris Williams, writer, artist, and psychoanalytic thinker, Rosemary Duffy and Gerry Byrne.

Conference chair: Margaret Rustin.

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Tom Paulin
/ Bernard O’Donoghue

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Programme:

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Welcome by Kate Carling and Margaret Rustin
(click ‘play’ icon) .

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Gerry Byrne – Brief paper ‘lost and found in translation
(podcast here)

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Meg Harris Williams – ‘The growing germ of thought: the influence on Bion of the Romantic poets’
(podcast here)

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Poetry Master-class: - Tom Paulin, Bernard O’Donoghue and Meg Harris Williams
(podcast here)

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Rosemary Duffy ‘The  Profane and the Poetic’
(podcast unavailable as it contains clinical material)

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Pamela Sorensen – ‘You had to be there – finding Meltzer on the page’
(podcast here)

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Plenary
(podcast here)

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Closing words by Ellie Roberts
(click ‘play’ icon) .

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childrenintroubledworlds.org

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Richard Overy – The German Pre-War Concentration Camps: Context and Explanation

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 25th, 2009

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Before the Holocaust: Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany 1933-1939
Birkbeck College – School of History, Classics and Archaeology in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London

25 September 2009, German Historical Institute London

At this conference at the German Historical Institute participants of the major AHRC project ‘Before the Holocaust: Concentration Camps in Nazi Germany 1933-1939’ will present some results of their research and discuss them with some leading scholars. Papers will focus on the development of the concentration camp system, the changing function of the camps within the Nazi dictatorship, the experience of different inmate groups, Camp SS personnel and the relationship between the camps and the German population. This research hopes to shed new light on the intricate relationship between terror, state and society in the Third Reich. It also seeks to uncover the foundations of the wartime concentration camps – sites of slave labour and mass extermination.

Keynote lecture:

Professor Richard Overy (Exeter)
The German Pre-War Concentration Camps: Context and Explanation

speaker_richardoveryRichard Overy was educated at Caius College, Cambridge. He taught at Cambridge from 1972 to 1979 at Queens’ College and from 1976-79 as a University Assistant Lecturer. From 1980 to 2004 he taught at King’s College, London where he was made professor of Modern History in 1994. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society (1977), Fellow of the British Academy (2000) and Fellow of King’s College (2003). In 2001 he was awarded the Samuel Elliot Morison Prize of the Society for Military History for his contribution to the history of warfare. In September 2004 he took up appointment as Professor of History at the University of Exeter.

Richard Overy’s publications

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Introduction by Professor Andreas Gestrich and Dr Nik Wachsmann

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Professor Richard Overy

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Questions

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Nik Wachsmann: Before the Holocaust: The Nazi concentration camps, 1933-39

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 24th, 2009

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24 September 2009  – 7pm

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A lecture by Dr Nik Wachsmann to mark the completion of a 3-year research project at Birkbeck College, University of London. Dr Wachsmann will present research findings on pre-WWII SS camps featuring an overview of the camps before the war, from their chaotic birth in 1933 to the escalation of terror and forced labour in 1938/9.

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Project website:  http://www.camps.bbk.ac.uk

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Joseph Roach: The Return of the Last of the Pequots: Disappearance as Heritage

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 18th, 2009

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Centre for International Theatre and Performance Research at Royal Holloway University of London

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speaker_josephroachJoseph RoachThe Return of the Last of the Pequots: Disappearance as Heritage

As a Native American society decimated by disease and massacred by New Englanders and their Native allies in 1637, the Pequots are often said to have been totally annihilated. In Moby Dick, Melville describes the Pequots as ‘extinct as the ancient Medes’ (Chap XVI), which is why he named the doomed Nantucket whaler of the story ‘Pequod’. But people calling themselves Pequots have been turning up ever since the seventeenth century, including Hannah Ocuish, whose public execution by hanging in New London in 1786 made news because she was 12 years old at the time. Today 785 tribal members claim Mashantucket Pequot identity as indigenous locals. Enjoying the special status of dual sovereignty with the State of Connecticut, they run the Foxwoods Resort Casino, which vies for the title of the largest gaming destination in the world, with 7,400 slot machines and keno drawings every eight minutes. At the same site, they also operate the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center to document their continuous history and celebrate their heritage. But what sort of heritage is founded on periodic erasure? This paper will interpret the experience of the Museum, which was originally designed as a theme-park ‘heritage ride’, as a performance/counter-performance of disappearance.

Joseph Roach is Sterling Professor of Theater and English and director of the World Performance Project at Yale University. His award-winning book,Cities of the Dead: Circum-Atlantic Performance (1996), has profoundly influenced thinking about history and memory, not only in performance studies but across the humanities disciplines. His most recent book is It (2007), a study of charismatic celebrity.

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Questions:

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accompanying slides:

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Renowned performance studies scholar Professor Joseph Roach (Yale) gave a public lecture on 18 September to launch the department’s new Centre for International Theatre and Performance Research. The Centre fosters research across a range of historical, geographical, political and methodological spheres to advance cutting-edge thinking on specific topics with a distinct international inflection. Areas of special focus include postcolonial, cross-cultural and intercultural performance; indigeneity in transnational contexts; Asian and Australian theatre cultures; international performance training practices; and the impacts of nation, diaspora and globalisation on theatre and performance.

Professor Roach’s lecture drew from his extensive research into performance history and contemporary culture in the Circum-Atlantic region

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Sacred Modernities: Rethinking Modernity in a Post-Secular Age – conference page

in Academic Service - Archive, Sacred Modernities: Rethinking Modernity in a Post-Secular Age by on September 17th, 2009

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