Leading London Theatre Critics In the Spotlight

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 26th, 2010

RoyalHolloway_DramaTheatre

Royal Holloway Department of Drama and Theatre

Event Date: 26 February 2010
Studio Theatre
Royal Holloway University of London


Leading London Theatre Critics In the Spotlight

Participants: Kate Bassett (The Independent on Sunday),  Lyn Gardner (The Guardian), Mark Shenton (The Sunday Express), and Ian Shuttleworth (Financial Times), chaired by Sheryl Hill and Karen Fricker.

This event brings together leading London theatre critics for an evening of conversation about the changing craft of theatre criticism. How is the decline of print media and the rise of Web 2.0 affecting 21st century theatre criticism? How do these critics understand the relationship between themselves, their readers, and the theatre industry? What advice can they offer to the next generation of critics and theatre practitioners? A panel discussion will be followed by question-and-answer session with a primarily student audience.

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After Human Rights?

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 26th, 2010

After Human Rights?

Event Date: 26 February 2010 6pm – 8pm:
Birkbeck College
Room B36, Birkbeck Main Building
5 pm Reception All Welcome

speakers: Costas Douzinas, Conor Gearty and Adam Weiss
Leah Bassel and Engin F. Isin (Co-chairs)

In the wake of the 60th anniversary of Universal Declaration of Human Rights, this public discussion panel seeks to explore a central and increasing tension between, on the one hand, the human rights tradition which dissociates rights from membership in a bounded community by making rights universal and, on the other hand, the modern tradition of citizenship that links rights and political participation to a nation-state. Conventional understandings and practices of the relationship between rights, recognition, territory and membership are increasingly blurred and it has become imperative to generate vocabularies, conceptual tools and programmes for action that are equal to the challenge of understanding and addressing the exclusion and marginalisation of rightless others in a globalising world. The panelists will examine, challenge and rethink the tension between ‘particular, nationally-bounded’ citizenship and ‘natural’ human rights drawing on the insights of theoretical and empirical scholarship and of the politics of human rights activism.

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Introduction by Engin F. Isin and Leah Bessel

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Conor Gearty

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Adam Weiss

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Costas Douzinas

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Leah Bassel, City University London. Leah Bassel examines the politics of citizenship and integration, focusing on the interface between normative and empirical approaches to debates over women’s rights and forced migration. Her work has been published in Government and Opposition, Parliamentary Affairs and Community Development Journal. She is currently preparing a monograph on the politics of refugee women’s integration in Canada and France.

Costas Douzinas, Birkbeck College. Costas Douzinas has published widely published on human rights, empire, justice, and the law. He taught at Middlesex, Lancaster and Birkbeck where he was appointed in 1992 as a member of the team, which established the Birkbeck School of Law. His latest book Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism was published in 2007.

Conor Gearty, LSE. Conor Gearty has published widely in the fields of terrorism, civil liberties and human rights. He has approached all these subjects in an inter- ‐disciplinary manner, and in particular has sought to locate them in their legal and political and historical contexts. His latest book, Essays on Human Rights and Terrorism’, was published in 2008.

Engin F. Isin, The Open University. Engin Isin has published widely on the politics of citizenship involving various sites, scales and subjects. From Cities Without Citizens (1992) to Being Political (2002) his concern has been to document historically how citizenship has been contested by its ‘others’ (strangers, outsiders, aliens) and how their claims to rights has constituted them as responsible subjects. His latest book Acts of Citizenship (edited with G. Nielsen) was published in 2008. Adam Weiss, AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe).

Adam Weiss is the Assistant Director of the AIRE Centre, a London- ‐based charity whose mission is to promote awareness of European law rights and assist vulnerable and marginalised individuals in asserting those rights. He is involved in representing applicants in cases before the European Court of Human Rights and in providing written legal advice to individuals on their rights under EU law .

 

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Moving Performers, Travelling Performance (session 3)

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 25th, 2010

RoyalHolloway_Geography

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC)
and the
Geography Department at Royal Holloway University of London

 

Date: 25 February 2010 (session 3)

‘Moving Performers, Travelling Performance’

Three roundtable discussions on the theme of ‘Moving Performers, Travelling Performance’ aim to stimulate interdisciplinary dialogue on the movement of performers, their practices, and their artefacts. By considering how performers negotiate stylistic, linguistic, cultural, and geopolitical borders from a range of perspectives, these events will examine the implications of mobility for questions of difference. Such discussion can encompass how performance can stabilise or rework conceptualisations of identity, performance, place, and cultural practice when it travels into different geographical contexts. The social and cultural norms of these contexts can themselves shape the meaning and form of performative praxis, rendering performers and their work resonant, subversive, or irreverent. Issues of directionality, itinerancy, and stasis also force consideration of the wider processes and power relationships that impact on questions of movement, and the cultural encounters or exchanges that are (per)formed as a result. Each roundtable will explore such issues through a moderated question and answer session with three speakers, followed by a broader discussion with the audience. All events will be held in the Geography Department, The Queen’s Building, in Room Q170 at 5.15-7pm


speakers:

Dr Amanda Rogers, Dr Shzr Ee Tan, Dr Estelle Castro
moderator Dr Matthew Cohen

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<<Sessions  One and Two>>

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Pakistan: business as usual?

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 25th, 2010

Research Network South Asia presents:

Date:  25 Feb 2010
Win 0-02

‘Pakistan: business as usual?

A round table event with David Taylor, Umar KhanDaniel Haines, Sarah Ansari, Humayun Ansari, Markus Daechsel

Instead of reflecting on the over-used question of whether Pakistan can ‘survive’ the present crisis, we will be posing a slightly more relaxed and historically informed question: what is really new about the present crisis, and to what extent are we dealing only with a variation on problems that have had a long established place in Pakistani history? What can we – as historians or historically informed political scientists – say about long-term trends in Pakistan’s history?

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Words and Music: Listening to Song

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 24th, 2010

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London

Event date: 24th February 2010

Organized By Professor Terence Cave (St. John’s College, Oxford)

Abstract:
The complex relations between music and language have been explored by poets, musicians, musicologists, literary critics and historians, psychologists, neuroscientists and many others across the disciplines. Thinking about the interaction betwen words and music in vocal music, and about the ways in which their joint effect is perceived by listeners and performers, may help us better to understand the differences and similarities, the compatibilities and incompatibilities, of these two fundamental forms of human expression and communication.

The two half-day sessions of the seminar “Words and Music” will set up a dialogue between speakers specialising in different aspects of this question, including a musicologist, an audio scientist, a practising poet, a composer, and literary specialists.

The discussions in both sessions will thus be cross-disciplinary. The issues they will explore bear on fundamental questions such as interpretation, aesthetic form and the way it is experienced, cognitive processes and strategies, and the nature of communication. We hope that our audience will represent a wide range of disciplines, including literary studies, musicology, cultural studies, philosophy, psychology, cognitive science and related subjects, and that it will make an important contribution to our discussions. In order to achieve this aim, the numbers of those attending will be limited and advance registration will be required.

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First session: Wednesday 24 February


Opening remarks (Ahuvia Kahane) and Introductory presentation (Terence Cave)

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Daniel Leech-Wilkinson (Musicology, King’s College London)
The construction of meaning from song performances: resemblance and style

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Jane Ginsborg (Psychology, Royal Northern College of Music)
Hearing, understanding and remembering the words and melodies of songs

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David Howard (Audio Laboratory, University of York)  
Hearing words from a singer and staying in tune as a singing group

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Responses: Elaine McGirr (English, RHUL) m , Andrew Bowie (Philosophy and German, RHUL)

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General discussion, with panel of speaker and respondents

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<<Session Two>>

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Robert C. Merton – Observations on the Science of Finance in the Practice of Finance: Past, Present, and Future

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 23rd, 2010

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Event Date: 23 February 2010

This year the annual Kolmogorov Lecture will be given by Nobel Prize winner Professor Robert Merton, from Harvard Business School. In the lecture – held at Royal Holloway, University of London on February 23 – Professor Merton will discuss the economic crisis and the important role of financial innovation and regulation in the future beyond the economic crisis.

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speaker_RobertMertonRobert C. Merton (John and Natty McArthur University Professor, Harvard Business School)
Observations on the Science of Finance in the Practice of Finance: Past, Present, and Future

For several decades, financial innovation has been a central force driving the global financial system toward greater efficiency with considerable economic benefit having accrued from those changes. The scientific breakthroughs in finance in this period both shaped, and were shaped by, the extraordinary innovations in finance practice that expanded opportunities for risk sharing, lowering transactions costs, and reducing information and agency costs. Today no major financial institution in the world, including central banks, can function without the computer‐based mathematical models of modern financial science and the myriad of derivative contracts and markets used to extract price‐ and risk‐ discovery information as well as execute risk‐transfer transactions. But also today, we are faced with the effects of a global financial crisis of a magnitude and scope not seen in nearly eighty years, which some attribute to the changes in the financial system brought about by financial innovation, derivatives, and mathematical models. The lecture will apply the tools of financial science to analyze and offer observations on the structural elements of financial crisis, on needed financial regulatory changes, and on the important role of financial innovation and science in the future beyond the crisis.

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Introduction by Prof Alexander Gammerman .

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vote of thanks by Prof Shafer .

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The Kolmogorov Lecture is given annually by distinguished researchers in the field of theoretical computer science, or related mathematical sciences, who made outstanding contributions to developing research directions initiated by Andrei N. Kolmogorov.

This lecture has been organised by Royal Holloway’s Computer Learning Research Centre.

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Mark Fisher – Nubureaucracy and Capitalist Realism

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 12th, 2010

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Date: 12 February 2010
Goldsmith’s College University of London, London SE14 6NW 

Mark Fisher – Nubureaucracy and Capitalist Realism

Neoliberalism presents itself as the enemy of bureaucracy, the destroyer of the nanny state and the eliminator of red tape. Mark Fisher’s Capitalist Realism (Zer0 books, 2009) argues that, contrary to this widely accepted story, bureaucracy has proliferated under neoliberalism. Far from decreasing, bureaucracy has changed form, spreading all the more insidiously in its newly decentralised mode. This ‘nu-bureaucracy’ is often carried out by workers themselves, now induced into being their own auditors. Capitalist Realism aims to challenge the successful ideological doublethink in which workers’ experience of increasing bureaucratisation co-exists with the idea that bureaucracy belongs to a ‘Stalinist’ past.

This symposium will explore nu-bureaucracy and other related concepts developed in Capitalist Realism, such as ‘business ontology’ and ‘market Stalinism’. How has nu-bureaucracy affected education and public services, and how can it be resisted? What implications might the attack on nu-bureaucracy have for a renewed anti-capitalism?

Respondent, Alberto Toscano, Department of Sociology

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Mark Fisher:

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Alberto Toscano

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John Foot – Italy’s Divided Memory. World War Two, 1940-1945

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 11th, 2010

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Birkbeck/Wiener Library Lectures:

Date: 11 February 2010

speaker_JohnFootProfessor John Foot (University College London): ‘Italy’s Divided Memory. World War Two, 1940-1945.’

John Foot is Professor of Modern Italian History in the Department of Italian at University College London. He has published very widely on modern Italian history. His books include Milan since the Miracle. City, Culture, Identity, Berg, Oxford, 2001; Disastro! Disasters in Italy since 1860: Culture, Politics, Society (edited with John Dickie and Frank Snowden), St Martins/Palgrave, 2002; Modern Italy, Palgrave, 2003; Calcio. A History of Italian Football, 4th Estate, London, 2006. His most recent book is Italy’s Divided Memory, Palgrave, 2010.

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Owen Wright – How French is frenkçin?

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 11th, 2010

RoyalAsiaticSociety

Royal Asiatic Society, London

Date: 11 February 2010

Professor Owen Wright (School of Oriental and African Studies) - How French is frenkçin?

Frenkçin is one of the rhythmic cycles of Turkish classical music, being used on occasion in the Mevlevi repertoire.  Its name clearly suggests a European link of some sort, and the most frequently cited account situates its origin within the world of cultural diplomacy, as a creative reworking of rhythmic elements in a piece performed by French musicians at the court of Süleyman the Magnificent.

Owen Wright teaches at the School of Oriental and African Studies.  His main research interest is the history of music in the Islamic Middle East.

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Rosemary Deem – The 21st century University – Dilemmas of Leadership and Organisational Futures

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 11th, 2010

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Event Date: 11 February 2010
Windsor Main Auditorium –  18:00

speaker_RosemaryDeemRosemary Deem, Professor of Higher Education Management and Dean of History and Social Sciences at Royal Holloway
The 21st century University – dilemmas of leadership and organisational futures

Conceptions of the purposes and roles of universities have been a source of debate for hundreds of years, but in the twenty-first century, the world-wide expansion of higher education systems, the pressures of globalisation, competition for overseas students, international league tables and pressure on both public and private funding of universities have led to fresh questioning about how they are to be funded, what they should be doing and for whom.
Notions about whether universities should be part of the public sphere or the private sector have also fed into this debate, as higher education institutions have increasingly been permeated by both markets (for students, for knowledge and academics) and financial constraints. The traditional missions of research and teaching have been joined by new requirements for entrepreneurial and public engagement activities. Professor Deem’s lecture will also consider the ways in which new conceptions of the purposes of universities could lead to reshaping of the organisational structures and cultures of higher education institutions. In so doing, the lecture will draw on recent research about leadership of public service organisations and the management of universities, as well as the lecturer’s own biographical insights into life as an manager-academic.

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Vote of thanks by Louise Morley:

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