Daniel Miller and Matt Cook – ‘Home’

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 28th, 2010

Event Date: 28 October 2010
12:00 – 14:00
Room 321 Birkbeck Main Building


Daniel Miller (UCL) and Matt Cook (Birkbeck) – ‘Home’

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At home with Shannon and Ricketts -  Matt Cook

The artists Charles Shannon and Charles Ricketts met at the City and Guilds Technical Art School in Kennington Park Rd, London, in 1882. They lived together in London (in Kennington, Chelsea, Richmond, and Kensington) and latterly also in a castle keep in Kent until Ricketts died some 49 years later. During this period they accumulated a vast collection of art and antiques which they displayed and stored in their various homes. In their wills they left the bulk of this collection to the Fitzwilliam Museum in Cambridge along with albums of photos in which they represent their homes in very particular ways – not as cosy retreats or havens of domestic bliss, but as treasure houses displaying their exquisite possessions and their investment in particular pasts and an aesthetic and artistic present.  In the correspondence and diaries that survive neither man describes himself as a homosexual or invert; nor do they allude to the sex they might have had together or the romantic attachment they may have felt. Their bond and relationship was articulated by the men themselves and by their circle of friends in terms of their co-residence; their emotional, practical, and aesthetic investment in the home; and the extraordinary collection which they accumulated and displayed together.  If home was a place of self expression but also secrecy, retreat and (if the police gained access) incrimination for some other ‘queer’ men during this period, Shannon and Ricketts sustained their coupledom and perhaps also protected it from criticism in part through what Sharon Marcus describes as ‘their intensely domestic existence’ and also their open, visible, and highly cultured rendition of home.
This paper explores the multiple strands of this ‘queer’ (that is – to their contemporaries – ‘odd’) couple’s domestic investment. How did it speak for and of them? How did it mark them out from, and connect them to, other individuals, couples and families they knew (including the Robert Ross; the Wildes; ‘Michael Field’ [the female poet duo]; and various married friends and their children)?  How did it relate to wider cultures of home? And how might it have rendered their partnership respectable and uncontentious; odd perhaps, but not despicable or immoral?   Taking Shannon and Ricketts as a case study, I examine some of the ways in which home might function as a symbol and material indicator of ‘queer’ alienation, belonging, difference, and ‘normalisation’ during this period, and ponder more broadly how house and home might speak to us now of queer lives in the past.

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Migration and Home in the age of FacebookDaniel Miller

What happens when Filipino children left behind by migrant parents are faced with the choice of whether to friend their mothers on Facebook? How have family relationships been transformed by what we call polymedia, that is a shift towards a slew of alternative media for transnational communication combined with a rapid reduction of cost? It might be presumed that such that parents, divided from their children, would be able to reconstitute their family and their home, now that they can be in touch twenty times a day by text or online with skype and webcam. Research by Mirca Madianou and myself with mothers in the UK and their children in the Philippines suggest that the effects of polymedia are far more complex and contradictory than that.

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Catherine Malabou – What is a Psychic Event? Freud and Contemporary Neurology on Trauma

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 26th, 2010




Event Date: 26 October 2010


Catherine Malabou
What is a Psychic Event? Freud and Contemporary Neurology on Trauma

 

 

CRMEP

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) is the leading centre for postgraduate level study and doctoral research in Continental Philosophy in the London area. Since its inception in 1994 it has developed a national and international reputation for teaching, research and publication in the field of post-Kantian European philosophy, characterised by a strong emphasis on broad cultural and intellectual contexts and a distinctive sense of social and political engagement. The CRMEP moved to Kingston University from Middlesex University in the summer of 2010. It is located across the faculties of Arts and Social Sciences (FASS) and Art, Design and Architecture (FADA).

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Should the University Survive in its Current Form? – Panel Discussion

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 25th, 2010






Event Date: October 25 2010
The William Beveridge Hall

Should the University Survive in its Current Form?

Panel Discussion


What does the future hold for universities? What could the role of the university be in the Big Society?

Just days after the Coalition Government’s first Comprehensive Spending Review, the Rt Hon David Willetts MP, Minister of State for Universities and Science, will join an esteemed panel, including AC Grayling, Professor of Philosophy at Birkbeck, and Professor Geoffrey Crossick, Vice-Chancellor at the University of London, for a cutting-edge debate on the future of our universities, to launch the popular Inside Out Festival 2010.

Other panelists for the opening event will include May Chien Busch, ex Chief Operating Officer, Morgan Stanley Europe, and Professor Rick Rylance, Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council. The event will be chaired by Anne McElvoy, New Statesman Columnist and Executive Editor of the London Evening Standard.

Speakers:

  • May Chien Busch, MCB Enterprises, ex Chief Operating Officer Morgan Stanley Europe
  • Professor Geoffrey Crossick, Vice-Chancellor, University of London
  • Professor AC Grayling, Birkbeck, University of London
  • Professor Rick Rylance, Chief Executive, Arts and Humanities Research Council
  • Rt Hon David Willetts MP, Minister of State for the Universities and Science

Chair:
Anne McElvoy, New Statesman Columnist and Executive Editor of the London Evening Standard.

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Paul Julian Smith – Hispanic Gay Autobiography: from Text to Film

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 19th, 2010

 

 

Event Date: Tuesday 19 October, 6 pm
in Main Lecture Theatre (MLT), Founder’s Building,
Royal Holloway, University of London

 

 

The David Vilaseca Memorial Lecture

‘Hispanic Gay Autobiography: from Text to Film’ Professor Paul Julian Smith

 

 

On Tuesday 19 October 2010, Professor Paul Julian Smith will deliver the first David Vilaseca Memorial Lecture, ‘Hispanic Gay Autobiography: from Text to Film’, at Royal Holloway, University of London. The Annual Lecture honours the memory of David Vilaseca, Professor of Hispanic Studies and Critical Theory at Royal Holloway, who died tragically in a road traffic accident in London on 9 February 2010. It will be followed by the launch of David’s last monograph, Queer Events: Post-Deconstructive Subjectivities in Spanish Writing and Film, 1960s to 1990s, published by Liverpool UP.

Professor Paul Julian Smith is Distinguished Professor, the PhD Programme in Hispanic and Luso-Brazilian Literatures and Languages at the Graduate Centre of the City University of New York, USA.


Johnny Depp in Before Night Falls


Abstract of the lecture
David Vilaseca made a decisive and lasting contribution to a Hispanism by offering masterful readings of life writings by Catalan painter and genius of self-invention Salvador Dalí, Cuban novelist, exile, and PWA Reinaldo Arenas, and Catalan poet, aesthete, and reluctant businessman, Jaime Gil de Biedma, who also succumbed to AIDS. The aim of this first memorial lecture is to give an account of David Vilaseca’s subtle and uncompromising readings of these three figures and to extend that critique to diverse film versions of their very different life stories. These are: British director Paul Morrison’s account of Dalí’s abortive affair with poet Federico García Lorca, Little Ashes (2009) (starring Twilight-hunk Robert Pattinson); New York painter Julian Schnabel’s version of Reinaldo Arenas’ autobiography Before Night Falls (2001) (starring Javier Bardem); and Valencian Sigfrid Monleón’s debut feature El cónsul de Sodoma (2010), a scandalous recreation of the cosmopolitan and pleasure-loving life of Jaime Gil de Biedma in both Manila and Barcelona (starring Jordi Mollà).

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Vote of Thanks by Richard Pym:

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Selected scenes from the films mentioned can be found on YouTube:

Little Ashes (2009)

Before Night Falls (2001)

El cónsul de Sodoma (2010)

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Evrim Binbas – The Timurid Republic of Letters in Iran and Central Asia 1400-1450

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 19th, 2010

Event date: 19 October 2010
17:30 McCrea 219




Royal Holloway Department of History Research Seminars 2010/2011


Dr. Evrim Binbas (Royal Holloway)
The Timurid Republic of Letters in Iran and Central Asia 1400-1450

This lecture discusses whether informal intellectual networks existed in late medieval Islamic history and if they did, whether they had any political potency. The presenter attempts to elucidate this issue in the context of a major crisis in which the Timurid ruler Shahrukh and the Timurid intellectuals clashed around the year 1426.




Chair: Francis Robinson

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Weipin Tsai – Breaking the Ice: the Modern Chinese Postal Service in the Winter Season in the Late Qing Period

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 14th, 2010

Event date: 14 October 2010 18:00
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD



Dr. Weipin Tsai
Breaking the Ice: the Modern Chinese Postal Service in the Winter Season in the Late Qing Period

The story of the modern Chinese postal service is highly instructive in understanding modern Chinese history. It particularly reveals how the Qing Government and later governments in the Republican period managed to reform, extend, unify and bring under state control China’s postal service, through lengthy and often energetic negotiations with both foreign and local powers, providing us with many insightful stories that illuminate politics and international relations. Meanwhile the arrival of the national postal service itself had significant effects across the whole of society, including impacts on trading patterns and the transmission of information and knowledge. Beyond institutional history and politics, the story of the postal service leads us into the heart of the communities it touched, and the changes in people’s daily lives.

Efforts to nationalise and unify the postal service were formally launched in March 1896, but in many ways this was a culmination of work initiated in previous decades. Beginning in 1878, a series of winter overland postal routes was established by the Chinese Maritime Customs Service. Gustav Detring (1842-1913), the Commissioner of Tianjin Port at that time, under the order of the Inspector General of the Chinese Maritime Customs Service, Robert Hart (1835-1911), was assigned to manage this project. This article will focus on the period 1878 to 1882, and will examine several fundamental challenges encountered during this short four-year project, which set the scene for subsequent unification, reform and expansion.

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Robert Gildea – The Personal and the Political in Oral Testimonies of French 1968 Activists

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 12th, 2010

Event date: 12 October 2010
17:30 McCrea 219




Royal Holloway Department of History
Research Seminars 2010/2011


Professor Robert Gildea (Oxford University)
The Personal and the Political in Oral Testimonies of French 1968 Activists

Chair: Graham Smith

This emerges from a collaborative project of historians from across Europe entitled ‘Around 1968: Activism, Networks, Trajectories’, which is rewriting the history of Europe’s 68 from the oral testimony of former 1968 activists. This lecture takes the very limited case of four former French activists, two men and two women, and explores the ways in which they talk about their engagement with political activism, about the friendship and conflict that existed in radical groups over questions such as sexual politics and political violence, and about how today they make sense of their radical past – does it still inspire them, or do they have regrets?

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Robert Eaglestone and Dan Stone – Trauma and History: Approaches to the Holocaust

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 12th, 2010

Event Date: Tuesday 12 October 2010, 5.00 pm
Venue: Royal Holloway, Room WIN 1-05

School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures

TRAUMA, FICTION, HISTORY seminar series

Professor Robert Eaglestone and Professor Dan Stone- Trauma and History: Approaches to the Holocaust

Abstract: How should we write and talk about the Holocaust? Do the facts speak for themselves, or do they defy speech altogether? Does trauma provide a lens which can help us understand the Holocaust or does it confuse an already bewilderingly complex issue? Aiming to go beyond polemical simplifications, two leading scholars from different disciplinary fields will discuss whether it is necessary, possible or even desirable to give clear cut answers to questions such as these.

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Introduction by Colin Davis: .

Professor Dan Stone is Professor of Modern History at Royal Holloway. For more information, click HERE.

 

 

 

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Professor Robert Eaglestone is Professor of Contemporary Literature and Thought at Royal Holloway. For more information, click HERE.

 

 

 

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Norah Titley: Tributes and Memories

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 7th, 2010

Event Date: 7 October 2010 18:00

 

 

 

Norah Titley: Tributes and Memories

Norah M. Titley Memorial Lecture
Dr Barbara Brend and Mr Jerry Losty

This lecture commemorates the life and achievements of Norah Titley, the noted Islamic art historian who died on the 21st March 2010 at the age of 89. She was known, in particular, for her work on the Persian, Turkish and Mughal manuscripts in the British Museum, later the British Library. Her major contribution to the field was the publication of detailed catalogues and subject indexes of the manuscripts which remain a fundamental tool for scholars working on these collections. Miniatures from Persian Manuscripts: Catalogue and Subject Index of Paintings from Persia, India and Turkey was published in 1977, and the catalogue and subject index for the Turkish manuscripts in 1982.

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Charlotte Epstein – When the Pre-modern is Post-Modern. Hobbes, Lacan and the Making of the International System

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 6th, 2010

Event date: Wednesday 6 October 2010
5.00-6.30pm FW101, Founder’s Building, 
Royal Holloway University of London



Humanities and Arts Research Centre and the New Political Communication Unit
at Royal Holloway University of London

Dr. Charlotte Epstein, University of Sydney - When the Pre-modern is Post-Modern. Hobbes, Lacan and the Making of the International System

Abstract: From Hans Morgenthau to Kenneth Waltz, via Carl Schmitt, the writings of Thomas Hobbes have played a key role in shaping Realist understandings of the international system. Less appraised are the uncanny similarities that exist between his political ontology and that of Jacques Lacan. In this paper I return to this fount of Realism to I show how these two worlds – that of the early modern thinker of the post-modern psychoanalyst – reveal ontologies of dependence and relationality. Specifically, I show that the figure of the sovereign, the linchpin of Hobbes’ political order, represents none other than Lacan’s Other. The implications are significant, as, in the light of these resemblances, the conclusions realists have drawn with regards to the possibilities of states’ acting in that system appear a misreading of Hobbes. Underpinning Hobbes’s thought is in fact a sense of the fundamental dependence between the self and the Other that rule out the type of survivalist behavior that they describe and prescribe.

Dr. Charlotte Epstein is a senior lecturer in International Relations in the Department of Government and International Relations, University of Sydney. Homepage

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