John Clarke – Crises and Conjunctures: looking for the here and now

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 10th, 2010

Diagnosing the Contemporary – Seminar Series

Event Date: Wednesday 10th March 3.30 
Room 254 Birkbeck Main Building

John Clarke (OU) – Crises and Conjunctures: looking for the here and now

The recent economic crisis has brought the questions and problems of analysing conjunctures back into focus. In this seminar, I want to return to the model of conjunctural analysis mapped out in Policing the Crisis (Hall et al., 1978) and explore three problems of trying to develop a conjunctural analysis of the present:

  1. The spatial composition of the conjuncture: where is the ‘here’ of the here and now?
  2. The temporal composition of the conjuncture: when is the ‘now’ of the here and now?
  3. Who are the social groups animated in the conjuncture and how do they become (or not) political forces?

John Clarke is Professor of Social Policy at the Open University, where he has worked for more than 25 years on the political and cultural struggles involved in remaking welfare states. He has a particular interest in the ways in which managerialism and consumerism have re-shaped the relations between welfare, states and nations. He is currently working with an international group on a project called Disputing Citizenship. His books include Changing Welfare, Changing States (Sage, 2004); Creating Citizen-Consumers (with Janet Newman and others, Sage, 2007) and Publics, Politics and Power: remaking the public in public services (with Janet Newman, Sage 2009).

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buy Policing the Crisis: Mugging, the State and Law and Order



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Paul Levine – Raoul Wallenberg in Budapest: Myth, History and Holocaust

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 8th, 2010

Event Date: Monday 8 March 2010 at 19:00

Dr Paul LevineRaoul Wallenberg in Budapest: Myth, History and Holocaust

Dr Paul Levine has been a Fellow of the Raoul Wallenberg Professorship at Rutgers University, and has lectured about Wallenberg and Holocaust history and pedagogy throughout Europe and the United States. He has advised Sweden’s government on issues related to the Holocaust, and was twice assistant academic advisor to the “Stockholm International Forum”. He is co-author of “Tell Ye Your Children, a Book about the Holocaust in Europe, 1933- 1945”, a highly praised pedagogic review of the Holocaust which has been distributed by governments or purchased in approximately 2 million copies in over a dozen countries since its initial publication.

Levine’s most recent publications include entries in Dictionnarie de la Shoah, (2009), and “On Lookers”, Oxford Handbook of Holocaust Studies (2010).He has written extensively on the moral aspects of Swedish neutrality during the Second World War. He is also, with Prof. David Cesarani, co-editor of Bystanders to the Holocaust; A Re-Evaluation. With David Gaunt, he is c-editor of, Collaboration & Resistance during the Holocaust; Belarus, Estonia, Latvia & Lithuania. Dr. Levine lives in Uppsala, Sweden with his three children.

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Jane Macnaughton – ‘It felt like she was coming out of my throat’: the perception of touch in clinical practice

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 3rd, 2010

Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC)

Event Date: 3 March 2010

Jane Macnaughton (Durham): ‘It felt like she was coming out of my throat’: the perception of touch in clinical practice

Part of our Medical Knowledge and Human Experience strand. It is extraordinary to reflect on the fact that in clinical practice is it possible for one stranger to touch another in a very intimate but wholly acceptable way. This kind of clinical interaction has had a lot of attention from an ethical point of view, mainly when that acceptability is breached in some way. This paper will instead explore the phenomenon of clinical touch in an interdisciplinary way: from the perspective of a clinician who is interested in phenomenology but also in empirical work exploring the intimacy of caring physically for the body, and how that feels for the person both physically and psychologically. Thinking of the perception of both doctor and patient, I will explore the questions, what is clinical touch for; who (or what) is touching who (or what); and what does touch mean?

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Words and Music: second session

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 3rd, 2010

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London

Event Date: 3rd March 2010

Organized By Professor Terence Cave (St. John’s College, Oxford)

Abstract:
The complex relations between music and language have been explored by poets, musicians, musicologists, literary critics and historians, psychologists, neuroscientists and many others across the disciplines. Thinking about the interaction betwen words and music in vocal music, and about the ways in which their joint effect is perceived by listeners and performers, may help us better to understand the differences and similarities, the compatibilities and incompatibilities, of these two fundamental forms of human expression and communication.

The two half-day sessions of the seminar “Words and Music” will set up a dialogue between speakers specialising in different aspects of this question, including a musicologist, an audio scientist, a practising poet, a composer, and literary specialists.

The discussions in both sessions will thus be cross-disciplinary. The issues they will explore bear on fundamental questions such as interpretation, aesthetic form and the way it is experienced, cognitive processes and strategies, and the nature of communication. We hope that our audience will represent a wide range of disciplines, including literary studies, musicology, cultural studies, philosophy, psychology, cognitive science and related subjects, and that it will make an important contribution to our discussions. In order to achieve this aim, the numbers of those attending will be limited and advance registration will be required.

Second session: Wednesday 3 March 2010

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Opening remarks Terrence Cave / Ahuvia Kahane

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Jo Shapcott (poet, RHUL) and John Woolrich (composer) in conversation

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David Owen Norris (Musical Performance, University of Southampton) “Parallel Universes”

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Responses:

Ewan Fernie (English, RHUL)

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Ahuvia Kahane (Classics, RHUL)

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General discussion, with panel of speakers and respondents

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<<Session One>>


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Stefan Collini – History in English Literary Criticism

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 2nd, 2010

Royal Holloway Department of History

Hayes Robinson Lecture

Date:  2 March 2010

Stefan Collini – (University of Cambridge) History in English Literary Criticism

The styles of literary criticism that were particularly influential in British culture in the middle decades of the 20th century have frequently been characterised as‘ahistorical’. This lecture identifies some of the fundamental historical assumptions underlying such work and situates them within a broader intellectual history.

Professor Stefan Collini, FBA, is Professor of Intellectual History and English Literature in the Faculty of English at Cambridge University. He has written widely on the relations between literature and intellectual history in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and is author of Liberalism and Sociology (1979), That Noble Science of Politics (1983), Public Moralists (1991), Matthew Arnold: A Critical Portrait (1994), English Pasts (1999), and Absent Minds: Intellectuals in Britain (2006). Collini has edited works by J.S. Mill, Matthew Arnold, Umberto Eco, and C.P. Snow, and published essays on T.S. Eliot, F.R. Leavis, George Orwell, Raymond Williams, cultural criticism, and the historical development of the concept of ‘culture,’ among other topics. His current research interests include ‘Condition-of-England’ writing, social criticism, literary journalism, the history of literary criticism, and ideas of culture. Collini is a frequent contributor to journals such as The Times Literary Supplement and The London Review of Books.

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Leading London Theatre Critics In the Spotlight

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 26th, 2010

RoyalHolloway_DramaTheatre

Royal Holloway Department of Drama and Theatre

Event Date: 26 February 2010
Studio Theatre
Royal Holloway University of London


Leading London Theatre Critics In the Spotlight

Participants: Kate Bassett (The Independent on Sunday),  Lyn Gardner (The Guardian), Mark Shenton (The Sunday Express), and Ian Shuttleworth (Financial Times), chaired by Sheryl Hill and Karen Fricker.

This event brings together leading London theatre critics for an evening of conversation about the changing craft of theatre criticism. How is the decline of print media and the rise of Web 2.0 affecting 21st century theatre criticism? How do these critics understand the relationship between themselves, their readers, and the theatre industry? What advice can they offer to the next generation of critics and theatre practitioners? A panel discussion will be followed by question-and-answer session with a primarily student audience.

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After Human Rights?

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 26th, 2010

After Human Rights?

Event Date: 26 February 2010 6pm – 8pm:
Birkbeck College
Room B36, Birkbeck Main Building
5 pm Reception All Welcome

speakers: Costas Douzinas, Conor Gearty and Adam Weiss
Leah Bassel and Engin F. Isin (Co-chairs)

In the wake of the 60th anniversary of Universal Declaration of Human Rights, this public discussion panel seeks to explore a central and increasing tension between, on the one hand, the human rights tradition which dissociates rights from membership in a bounded community by making rights universal and, on the other hand, the modern tradition of citizenship that links rights and political participation to a nation-state. Conventional understandings and practices of the relationship between rights, recognition, territory and membership are increasingly blurred and it has become imperative to generate vocabularies, conceptual tools and programmes for action that are equal to the challenge of understanding and addressing the exclusion and marginalisation of rightless others in a globalising world. The panelists will examine, challenge and rethink the tension between ‘particular, nationally-bounded’ citizenship and ‘natural’ human rights drawing on the insights of theoretical and empirical scholarship and of the politics of human rights activism.

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Introduction by Engin F. Isin and Leah Bessel

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Conor Gearty

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Adam Weiss

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Costas Douzinas

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Leah Bassel, City University London. Leah Bassel examines the politics of citizenship and integration, focusing on the interface between normative and empirical approaches to debates over women’s rights and forced migration. Her work has been published in Government and Opposition, Parliamentary Affairs and Community Development Journal. She is currently preparing a monograph on the politics of refugee women’s integration in Canada and France.

Costas Douzinas, Birkbeck College. Costas Douzinas has published widely published on human rights, empire, justice, and the law. He taught at Middlesex, Lancaster and Birkbeck where he was appointed in 1992 as a member of the team, which established the Birkbeck School of Law. His latest book Human Rights and Empire: The Political Philosophy of Cosmopolitanism was published in 2007.

Conor Gearty, LSE. Conor Gearty has published widely in the fields of terrorism, civil liberties and human rights. He has approached all these subjects in an inter- ‐disciplinary manner, and in particular has sought to locate them in their legal and political and historical contexts. His latest book, Essays on Human Rights and Terrorism’, was published in 2008.

Engin F. Isin, The Open University. Engin Isin has published widely on the politics of citizenship involving various sites, scales and subjects. From Cities Without Citizens (1992) to Being Political (2002) his concern has been to document historically how citizenship has been contested by its ‘others’ (strangers, outsiders, aliens) and how their claims to rights has constituted them as responsible subjects. His latest book Acts of Citizenship (edited with G. Nielsen) was published in 2008. Adam Weiss, AIRE Centre (Advice on Individual Rights in Europe).

Adam Weiss is the Assistant Director of the AIRE Centre, a London- ‐based charity whose mission is to promote awareness of European law rights and assist vulnerable and marginalised individuals in asserting those rights. He is involved in representing applicants in cases before the European Court of Human Rights and in providing written legal advice to individuals on their rights under EU law .

 

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Moving Performers, Travelling Performance (session 3)

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 25th, 2010

RoyalHolloway_Geography

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC)
and the
Geography Department at Royal Holloway University of London

 

Date: 25 February 2010 (session 3)

‘Moving Performers, Travelling Performance’

Three roundtable discussions on the theme of ‘Moving Performers, Travelling Performance’ aim to stimulate interdisciplinary dialogue on the movement of performers, their practices, and their artefacts. By considering how performers negotiate stylistic, linguistic, cultural, and geopolitical borders from a range of perspectives, these events will examine the implications of mobility for questions of difference. Such discussion can encompass how performance can stabilise or rework conceptualisations of identity, performance, place, and cultural practice when it travels into different geographical contexts. The social and cultural norms of these contexts can themselves shape the meaning and form of performative praxis, rendering performers and their work resonant, subversive, or irreverent. Issues of directionality, itinerancy, and stasis also force consideration of the wider processes and power relationships that impact on questions of movement, and the cultural encounters or exchanges that are (per)formed as a result. Each roundtable will explore such issues through a moderated question and answer session with three speakers, followed by a broader discussion with the audience. All events will be held in the Geography Department, The Queen’s Building, in Room Q170 at 5.15-7pm


speakers:

Dr Amanda Rogers, Dr Shzr Ee Tan, Dr Estelle Castro
moderator Dr Matthew Cohen

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<<Sessions  One and Two>>

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Pakistan: business as usual?

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 25th, 2010

Research Network South Asia presents:

Date:  25 Feb 2010
Win 0-02

‘Pakistan: business as usual?

A round table event with David Taylor, Umar KhanDaniel Haines, Sarah Ansari, Humayun Ansari, Markus Daechsel

Instead of reflecting on the over-used question of whether Pakistan can ‘survive’ the present crisis, we will be posing a slightly more relaxed and historically informed question: what is really new about the present crisis, and to what extent are we dealing only with a variation on problems that have had a long established place in Pakistani history? What can we – as historians or historically informed political scientists – say about long-term trends in Pakistan’s history?

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Words and Music: Listening to Song

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 24th, 2010

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London

Event date: 24th February 2010

Organized By Professor Terence Cave (St. John’s College, Oxford)

Abstract:
The complex relations between music and language have been explored by poets, musicians, musicologists, literary critics and historians, psychologists, neuroscientists and many others across the disciplines. Thinking about the interaction betwen words and music in vocal music, and about the ways in which their joint effect is perceived by listeners and performers, may help us better to understand the differences and similarities, the compatibilities and incompatibilities, of these two fundamental forms of human expression and communication.

The two half-day sessions of the seminar “Words and Music” will set up a dialogue between speakers specialising in different aspects of this question, including a musicologist, an audio scientist, a practising poet, a composer, and literary specialists.

The discussions in both sessions will thus be cross-disciplinary. The issues they will explore bear on fundamental questions such as interpretation, aesthetic form and the way it is experienced, cognitive processes and strategies, and the nature of communication. We hope that our audience will represent a wide range of disciplines, including literary studies, musicology, cultural studies, philosophy, psychology, cognitive science and related subjects, and that it will make an important contribution to our discussions. In order to achieve this aim, the numbers of those attending will be limited and advance registration will be required.

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First session: Wednesday 24 February


Opening remarks (Ahuvia Kahane) and Introductory presentation (Terence Cave)

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Daniel Leech-Wilkinson (Musicology, King’s College London)
The construction of meaning from song performances: resemblance and style

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Jane Ginsborg (Psychology, Royal Northern College of Music)
Hearing, understanding and remembering the words and melodies of songs

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David Howard (Audio Laboratory, University of York)  
Hearing words from a singer and staying in tune as a singing group

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Responses: Elaine McGirr (English, RHUL) m , Andrew Bowie (Philosophy and German, RHUL)

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General discussion, with panel of speaker and respondents

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<<Session Two>>

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