Jean Marc Dewaele – Trilingual First Language Acquisition: Perspectives from the child, the father and the researcher

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 28th, 2011

Event Date: 28 February 2011 18:30 – 20:00
G02 Birkbeck College, 43 Gordon Square
LONDON WC1E

 

Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series


Professor Jean Marc Dewaele (Department of Applied Linguistics and Communication)
Trilingual First Language Acquisition: Perspectives from the child, the father and the researcher

An old and unsubstantiated fear was that children growing up with multiple languages from birth end up with incomplete knowledge of all of their languages. Recent research has shown that this is not the case, and using his 14 year old trilingual daughter as an example, Jean-Marc Dewaele shows that early multilingualism (in this case Dutch, French and English) can lead to high achievement.

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Problematising Danger

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 22nd, 2011

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Event Date: 21 – 22 February 2011
The River Room
King’s College London, Strand Campus
London WC2R 2LS

Problematising Danger

ESRC Seminar Series- Contemporary Biopolitical Security

 

Co-sponsored by the Biopolitics of Security Network,
the Emerging Securities Research Unit @ Keele University
and the Centre for International Relations, Department of War Studies, King’s College London


Download workshop package here

“There is no liberalism without a culture of danger.” (Foucault)

Threats and risks have become the preferred categories for imagining contemporary security. Practices such as defence, border control and the surveillance of populations, insurance, risk profiling to identify suspicious subjects, and risk assessments to protect objects and systems such as critical infrastructure, rely heavily on well-established paradigms of security. Discourses and practices of threats and risks, with their allied technologies of measurement and calculation, however, relate to the wider problem of danger and its allied concept of ‘uncertainty’. Thinking ‘danger’ relates to understandings of uncertainties, otherness of being, and spaces and environments of protection in excess of those accounted for in the language and metrics of discourses of threats and risks.

What happens, then, if the analysis of security resorts to understandings of ‘danger’, ‘dangerousness’, and processes of ‘endangerment’? Is it possible to think security by referring ideas of danger to understandings of life, livelihoods and lifestyles, instead of ready-made ‘objects’ of security such as sovereignty, territory, the nation-state, citizens, borders, and sociological categories such as class and gender? Is it possible to think security in relation to danger away from utilitarian economic categories such as cost-benefit analysis, risk calculus, and rational choice?

The workshop aims to explore these questions and to challenge participants to wonder if current policy security priorities such as terrorism, climate change, weapons proliferation, resilience and migration can be thought in relation to ‘danger’ outside discourses of threats and risks.

In the first three workshops of this seminar series we began to explore an agenda for contemporary biopolitical security research around problems such as mobilities and circulations, resilience, values and processes of valuations in relation to the technologies through which lifestyles and livelihoods are treated as referents of security. In this fourth workshop we intend to spark a conversation around the implications of thinking dangerousness in relation to security and life.

The workshop is based on participants’ work and invites a reflection on the following questions:

- How are ideas of danger constituted? What forms of ‘data’, ‘information’, and ‘knowledge’ are involved in constituting a dangerous subject or a dangerous environment?

- What are the preconditions for understanding endangerment in and how do they question the ‘new security challenges’ of for example, terrorism (and cyber-terrorism), proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, climate change, and health pandemics?

- Can discourses and practices of security be different if reflections on the consequences of endangerment are advanced?

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Programme:

MONDAY 21 FEBRUARY

Luis Lobo-Guerrero and Vivienne Jabri – Introduction

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Panel 1 – Ontologisations of Danger

  • Btihaj AjanaRe-ontologising Danger (AUDIO HERE)
  • Joscha Wullweber Strategies of Danger and Dangerous Strategies (AUDIO HERE)
  • David Chandler The Ontology of Danger:Recasting the Human Subject in Discourses of Vulnerability and Resilience (AUDIO HERE)
  • Andrew Neal The Entropy of Dangerousness (AUDIO HERE)

Chair: Martin Coward (Newcastle University)

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Panel 2 – Risk managing the dangerousness of terror

  • Cerelia AthanassiouChanging the Global War on Terror: Who is the ‘Ready’ Citizen Arming Against? (AUDIO HERE)
  • Lisa Stampnitzky- Constituting terrorism: three attempts at rational governance (AUDIO HERE)
  • Christopher ZebrowskiFalling-out: Examining the problematising capacities of danger (AUDIO HERE)
  • Jonas HagmannRisk registers and the measurement of everything: Security scientism and the reassertion of modernism (AUDIO HERE)

Chair: Claudia Aradau (The Open University)

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Panel 3 – Danger’s Otherness

  • Debbie LisleDanger’s Other: Pleasure, Leisure & Travel (AUDIO HERE)
  • Sam Okoth OpondoFearscapes / Securescapes : Urban Anxieties, Securities and the Domestic Scene (AUDIO HERE)

Chair: Vivienne Jabri

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Keynote Address:

Professor Marieke de Goede
Networked Danger and Speculative Security (AUDIO HERE)

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TUESDAY 22 February

Panel 4 – Sites, spaces and strategies of endangerment

  • Charlotte Heath-KellyCounter-Terrorism and the Counterfactual: Producing the ‘Radicalisation’ Discourse and the UK PREVENT strategy (AUDIO HERE)
  • Casey McNeillDanger and un-governed spaces in the US (AUDIO HERE)
  • Alex Hamilton – ‘Dangerous tools’ in ‘dangerous hands’: How synthetic biology is imagined as a ‘bioterrorist threat’ (AUDIO HERE)

Chair: Peter Adey

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Final Roundtable and Conclusions With:

  • Mustapha Pasha (University of Aberdeen)
  • Marieke de Goede (University of Amsterdam)
  • Luis Lobo-Guerrero (Keele University)
  • Vivienne Jabri (King’s College London)
  • Martin Coward (Newcastle University)

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Vivian Nutton – Galen, from Byzantium to Basle

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 22nd, 2011

Event Date: 22 February 2011 17:30
McCrea 201

 

 

Royal Holloway Department of History


Professor Vivian Nutton (University College London) – Galen, from Byzantium to Basle

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Jerry White – Vengeance and the Crowd in Eighteenth-Century London

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 21st, 2011

Event Date: 21 February 2011 18:30 – 20:00
B04 Birkbeck College, Malet St
LONDON WC1E 7XH

 

Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Jerry White (Department of History, Classics and Archaeology) – Vengeance and the Crowd in Eighteenth-Century London

In this lecture Jerry White focuses on the eighteenth-century crowd as an agent of popular justice in opposition to the institutions of a corrupted rule of law. And he explores how, at its worst, that same crowd could be as savage and merciless as the system it sought to oppose.

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Protected: Eurovision and the ‘New’ Europe: European Margins and Multiple Modernities

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 18th, 2011

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Interpreting Imaginary Jews

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 17th, 2011

Event date:  17 February  2011
Room B04, Birkbeck College
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX


PEARS INSTITUTE FOR THE STUDY OF ANTISEMITISM

Birkbeck, University of London

Disciplining Antisemitism Series: Interpreting Imaginary Jews

 

Round-table discussion with:

  • Dr Anthony Bale (Birkbeck, University of London)
  • Dr Nadia Valman (Queen Mary, University of London)
  • Professor John Arnold (Birkbeck, University of London)

Many medieval Christians believed that Jews committed crimes against Christian children and were out to destroy their religion and way of life.  They retaliated with violence of their own, denying Jews theright to religious freedom and peace.  Dr Bale’s new book Feeling
Persecuted: Christians, Jews and Images of Violence in the Middle Ages (Reaktion Books, 2010)
exposes how the images of Christian suffering and persecution were central to medieval ideas of love, community and home. By examining poetry, drama, visual culture, theology and philosophy, he reveals the recreational persecution of Jews as a part of medieval life and culture. The book forms the starting point for this round-table discussion.

This event is part of the Disciplining Antisemitism series organised by the Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism. The Institute is funded by the Pears Foundation and based at Birkbeck, University of London. It is a centre of innovative researchand teaching, contributing to discussion and policy formation on antisemitism and racism. It is both independent and inclusive. To receive information on future events contact the administrator.

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Introduction by Professor David Feldman .

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Dr Athony Bale

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Professor John Arnold

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Dr Nadia Valman

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Jacquelyn Bessell – Advice from the Players

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 17th, 2011





Event Date: 17 February 2011
The Shakespeare Institute
Mason Croft, Church Street
Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 6HP

Dr Jacquelyn Bessell (Lecturer, Shakespeare Institute) – Advice from the Players

The Shakespeare Institute

An internationally renowned research institution established in 1951 to push the boundaries of knowledge about Shakespeare Studies and Renaissance Drama. The Shakespeare Institute offers a wide range of innovative postgraduate degrees, including postgraduate research.

During the Autumn and Spring terms, the Institute runs a series of Thursday seminars which are given by members of staff and invited speakers. The Thursday Seminars for the Spring Term 2011 are listed below. The seminars start at 2.00pm lasting approximately 45 minutes followed by a question and answer session. University of Birmingham staff and students, and guests are welcome to attend.

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Anna Whitelock – ‘Woman, Warrior, Queen’: Rethinking Mary I and Elizabeth I

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 15th, 2011

Event Date: 15 February 2011 17:30
McCrea 201

 

 

Royal Holloway Department of History


Dr Anna Whitelock (Royal Holloway)
Woman, Warrior, Queen’: Rethinking Mary I and Elizabeth I

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Tudor Queenship: The Reigns of Mary and Elizabeth

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Lynne Segal & Stephen Frosh – Intimacy and Love

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 14th, 2011

Event Date: 14 February 2011

 

 

The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Lynne Segal and Professor Stephen Frosh (Department of Psychosocial Studies)
Intimacy and Love.

Is love something artificial, just a form of illusion? Many theorists have argued this, but why then do so many people experience it as real? In this Valentine’s Day presentation, Stephen Frosh and Lynne Segal debate this and related issues, asking: Is love possible?

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Hito Steyerl- Look out, it’s real : Documentary truth and tear gas

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 10th, 2011



Event Date: 10 February 2011 18:00
Swedenborg Hall, 20-21
Bloomsbury Way, London
WC1A 2TH

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
(CRMEP) presents


Hito Steyerl (Artist, Berlin) - Look out, it’s real : Documentary truth and tear gas

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Medium Cool (1969) Haskell Wexler on youtube 13 parts

Look out Haskell, it’s real! The Making of Medium Cool







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