Brian Cathcart – The Phone-hacking Scandal

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 28th, 2011

Event Date 28 March 2011
Penrhyn Road campus, Kingston University 


Professor Brian CathcartThe Phone-hacking Scandal

The scandal of phone hacking at the News of the World tells us a great deal about how Britain is run. On any normal measure the revelation that a foreign-owned corporation might have been intercepting the communications of Cabinet ministers should be sensational and shocking, yet five years into this affair most people are barely conscious that that is at issue here. Why have we been so slow to react? Why is it taking so long for the facts to come out?

Brian Cathcart is professor of journalism at Kingston University London, and served as specialist adviser to the inquiry into phone hacking by the House of Commons select committee on media, culture and sport. He has also written about the affair in the Guardian and the Independent on Sunday, and on the Free Speech blog of Index on Censorship.

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Giorgio Agamben – What is a Commandment?

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 28th, 2011



Event Date: 28 March 2011
Clattern Lecture Theatre, Main Building
Penrhyn Road campus, Kingston University


 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
(CRMEP) presents


Giorgio Agamben (Visiting Professor, Philosophy, University of Paris)
What is a Commandment?



Giorgio Agamben is Visiting Professor, Philosophy, University of Paris 8, and is the author of many books including Language and Death: The Place of Negativity (University of Minnesota Press, 1991), Stanzas: Word and Phantasm in Western Culture (University of Minnesota Press, 1993),  Infancy and History: The Destruction of Experience (Verso, 1993), Idea of Prose (State University of New York Press, 1995), The Coming Community (University of Minnesota Press, 1993), Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life (Stanford University Press, 1998),  The Man without Content (Stanford University Press, 1999), The End of the Poem: Studies in Poetics (Stanford University Press, 1999), Remnants of Auschwitz: The Witness and the Archive (Zone Books, 1999), Potentialities: Collected Essays in Philosophy (Stanford University Press, 1999), and Profanations (Zone Books, 2007).

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Karen Wells – Whose Children: Child protection in the global world

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 28th, 2011

Event Date: 28 March 2011
Birkbeck Cinema
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck College
LONDON WC1E



 

The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series


Dr Karen Wells (Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies) –
Whose Children: Child protection in the global world.

The ‘best interests of the child’ is the lynchpin of international law and social policy in relation to children’s rights and child protection. This lecture explores the tension between the presumption that ‘best interests’ are self-evident and the multiplicity of normative childhoods in a globalised world.

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Slavoj Zizek – Masterclass – The Limits of Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2011

Event Date: 23, 25 & 26 March 2011



The Limits of Hegel


Slavoj ZizekMasterclass

While the global political and social situation is getting more and more explosive, emancipatory struggles are more and more hampered by ideological prejudices. This is why some ruthless clarifications are necessary.



Part I (23 March 2011)

Part II (25 March 2011)

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Expression and Expressive Communication

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 25th, 2011

Event date: 24 – 26 March 2011
Institute of Philosophy
University of London
Senate House
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

 

Expression and Expressive Communication


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Day 2 (Fri March 25 2011):


Session II – Evolutionary/Ethological Perspectives on Communication

Paper 1: Professor Jim Hurford (Edinburgh) -
On Problems and Prospects in the Study of language Evolution 
[AUDIO HERE]

Paper 2: Dr Juan Carlos Gomez (St. Andrews) – Expressive Communication in Apes
[AUDIO HERE]

Commentary: Professor Hans-Johann Glock ( Zurich)
[AUDIO HERE]

discussion Session II .


Session III – Neurobiological Perspectives on Communicative Behavior

Paper 1: Professor Leonardo Fogassi (Parma) -
Neuroscience of Communication, Mirror Neurons
[AUDIO HERE]

Paper 2: Dr Natalie Sebanz (Nijmegen) - On Contagion, Empathy, and Other Mechanisms of Behaviour Recognition/Categorization
[AUDIO HERE]

Commentary: Professor Stephen Butterfill (Warwick)
[AUDIO HERE]

discussion Session III .

 

Roundtable Discussion

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Slavoj Zizek – Masterclass – Lacan and Sexual Difference

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 25th, 2011

Event Date: 23, 25& 26 March 2011



Lacan and Sexual Difference


Slavoj ZizekMasterclass

While the global political and social situation is getting more and more explosive, emancipatory struggles are more and more hampered by ideological prejudices. This is why some ruthless clarifications are necessary.


Part I (23 March 2011)

Part III (26 March 2011)

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Slavoj Zizek – Masterclass – The Idea of Communism and its Actuality

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2011

Event Date: 23, 25 & 26 March 2011



Masterclass – The Idea of Communism and its Actuality

Slavoj Zizek

While the global political and social situation is getting more and more explosive, emancipatory struggles are more and more hampered by ideological prejudices. This is why some ruthless clarifications are necessary.



Part II (25 March 2011)

Part III (26 March 2011)

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introduction by Costas Douzinas .

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The Philosophy of Literature

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2011

Event date: 23 February-23 March 2011
Win1-04, Windsor Building 
Royal Holloway University

 

 

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC) at
Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The Philosophy of Literature




Organiser: Professor John O’Brien

During the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the characteristics of the philosophical approach to literature have undergone some important changes. Alongside the continuation of the traditions of Continental thought, representatively symbolized by the work of Badiou and Rancière, can be detected a move back to elements that were challenged 40 years ago by the generation of Barthes, Lacan, Foucault and Derrida. The death of the author is now being countered by the notion of the author as intentional subject; the disconnection between life and art-work is giving way to a new interest in biography; the notion of the self-contained work of art, or of art-as-textuality, is being displaced in favour of a view of literary language as a hard-wired element of human cognition. From Marion’s version of phenomenology to Currie’s Arts and Minds, the philosophy that might underlie literature is being re-appraised.

Session 1(23 February 2011) : The Intentional Subject

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Introduction: Professor John O’Brien
  • Professor Andrew Bowie (Philosophy)
  • Professor Dan Rebellato (Drama)


Session 2 (16 March 2011): (T)exteriors

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (English)
  • Dr Ruth Cruickshank (French)
  • Dr Clare Connors (English, UEA)


Session 3 (23 March 2011): The Intentional Act

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Professor Colin Davis (French)
  • Dr James Helgeson (French, Nottingham)
  • Dr Tim Chesters (French)
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Ruth Harvey – The Lady and the Song

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 22nd, 2011

Event Date: 22 March 2011
Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway
Egham TW 20 0EX



School of Modern Languages, Literatures & Cultures

Royal Holloway University of London

Inaugural Lecture


Professor Ruth Harvey (Professor of Medieval Occitan Literature) – The Lady and the Song

The medieval troubadours are best known for their creation of Courtly Love, a cultural transformation affecting the whole course of European literature and sensibilities. The idealised Lady addressed in their love-songs lacked voice or agency. In contrast, this lecture will focus on some of the many ways in which noblewomen actively nourished and exploited this cultural shift: as patrons, politicians, poets and critics.

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Introduction by Professor Geoff Ward (Vice-Principal Royal Holloway) .

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Simon Gaunt (King’s College, London) .

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Orbiting London – A Conversation with Iain Sinclair

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2011

Event Date: 21 March 2011
Room B36
Birkbeck College
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX


Orbiting London – A Conversation with Iain Sinclair


Iain Sinclair, writer, poet and film-maker, will discuss – in conversation with Iain Boal, (social historian and Fellow of the Institute for the Humanities) his four decades of chronicling the life of the capital. More than any contemporary author Sinclair’s work is suffused with the spirit of place, of London as a palimpsest, in particular the environs of Hackney, his home since the mid-60s. Sinclair’s books include Downriver, Rodinsky’s Room, London Orbital, Lights out for the Territory, London: City of Disappearances, Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire.

Iain Boal (BIH Research Fellow) is a social historian of science and technics, with a special interest in visual culture, public space and the commons. Educated in the British Isles, he moved to the US in 1982, where he has taught at Harvard, Stanford and the University of California, in the Geography Dept at Berkeley and Community Studies at Santa Cruz. He is associated with Retort, a group of writers, artists and artisans based for two decades in the San Francisco Bay Area. With James Brook he edited Resisting the Virtual Life: The Culture and Politics of Information (City Lights). He is the author, with T.J. Clark, Joseph Matthews and Michael Watts, of Retort’s Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War (Verso). He is co-editor of West of Eden: Communes and Utopia in Northern California (PM Press, 2011), and his brief history of the bicycle in planetary perspective, The Green Machine, is forthcoming from Notting Hill Editions. In 2005/6 he was a Guggenheim Fellow in Science and Technology.

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