Susan James – Imagining Political Consensus

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2011

Event Date: 21 March 2011
Room B36
Birkbeck College,
Malet St
LONDON WC1E

 

The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Susan James (Department of Philosophy) – Imagining Political Consensus

An image of political consensus plays a large role in political philosophy. But it does not seem to be realisable. How, then, should we think about it? In this lecture I’ll discuss some historical and contemporary answers.

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The political economy of social reproduction across the lifecourse: global perspectives

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


The political economy of social reproduction across the lifecourse:

global perspectives

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

introduction.

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The Philosophy of Literature – (T)exteriors

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 16th, 2011

Event date: 16 March 2011 17:00 – 19:00
Win1-04, Windsor Building
Royal Holloway University

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC) at
Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The Philosophy of Literature



 

Organiser: Professor John O’Brien

During the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the characteristics of the philosophical approach to literature have undergone some important changes. Alongside the continuation of the traditions of Continental thought, representatively symbolized by the work of Badiou and Rancière, can be detected a move back to elements that were challenged 40 years ago by the generation of Barthes, Lacan, Foucault and Derrida. The death of the author is now being countered by the notion of the author as intentional subject; the disconnection between life and art-work is giving way to a new interest in biography; the notion of the self-contained work of art, or of art-as-textuality, is being displaced in favour of a view of literary language as a hard-wired element of human cognition. From Marion’s version of phenomenology to Currie’s Arts and Minds, the philosophy that might underlie literature is being re-appraised.

Session 2: (T)exteriors

  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (English)

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  • Dr Ruth Cruickshank (French)

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  • Dr Clare Connors (English, UEA)

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<<== back to main conference page

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Part Time Students are Special: Recent Research Findings

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 14th, 2011

Event Date: 14 March 2011 18:30 – 20:00
Room B04, Birkbeck College
LONDON WC1E



The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Claire Callender and Anne Jamieson, Department of Social Policy and Education

Claire Callender and Anne Jamieson present their latest research findings on part-time students , their backgrounds and choices.

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Introduction by Professor Sue Jackson
(Birkbeck Institute for Life-long Learning) .
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Part One:
Professor Clare Callender

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Part Two:
Dr Anne Jamieson

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Rei Terada – Politics After Expectation

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 14th, 2011

Event Date: 14 March 2011
Swedenborg Hall, 20-21
Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH


Professor Rei Terada (UCI) - Politics After Expectation

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Taking Control – conference page

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on March 12th, 2011





 

Event date: 12 March 2011
Main Building
School of Oriental and African Studies
University of London

Taking Control

This conference is concerned with control.  On what it means today – under globalised late capitalism – to take or be in control of institutions, whether political, economic, or academic.  We are concerned with theorising how to take control, and on what to do when we take it.  We want to focus not on the dangers of control – since the corrupting effects of power have been amply theorized – but rather on what it means to take responsibility and effect change, and what this change could be.

That is, how can a vision for society be enacted in practical terms?  What is the role of democratic participation in this process of mastering social change?  And how do we remain accountable as we take control.  Does taking control mean working against, within or beside the existing institutional structure?

This question remains under-theorised in contemporary critical political theory – which often remains limited to the critique of the status quo. Without the impulse to take responsibility and take control, this critique becomes meaningless – it results in a de facto acceptance.  Where projects like the ‘Idea of Communism’ stop, this conference seeks to take the next step.  It must be situated along work such as the Turbulence Collective’s ‘What it means to win’ volume and Erik-Olin-Wright’s ‘Envisioning Utopias’.

We are clear that the idea of communism remains important and a project to be fought for.  However in the strategic question we are at an impasse, how to take control and implement a new communism? The vanguard model seems discredited, but the model of the multitude seems non-committal, a mere waiting for things to gradually come together, resulting in a de facto withdrawal from the social. Even more than this impasse, in times of late capitalism the very meaning of what being in control entails is no longer clear.  We want to move from thinking about the idea of communism to implementing it.

Organised by ES: Philosophy Research Collective
With support from the Department of Politics and International Studies, SOAS Department of Politics, Goldsmiths

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PROGRAMME:

Keynote Address:

Jodi Dean (Hobart and William Smith)
The Communist Horizon [AUDIO HERE]

Chair: Saul Newman

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Panel A: Control and the Global

David Chandler (Wesminster)
The Problematic of Control in a Global World  
[AUDIO HERE]

Vassilis Fouskas (Richmond)
Deconstructing Hub and Spoke Imperialism 
[AUDIO HERE]

Stephen Chan (SOAS)  Discussant .

Panel A – questions.

Chair: Alexej Ulbricht

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Panel B: Movements, Violence and Control

Phil Edwards (Manchester Met)
Terrible Beauty seeks Geometric Potency: arms and the law in the anni di plombo
[AUDIO HERE]

Christian Garland
A Dual-power situation? Communization and the Materiality of Anti-power
[AUDIO HERE]

Ben Whitham (Reading)
The Millbank Riot: A Step in the Direction of Control?
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel B – questions.

Chair: Luke Evans

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Panel C: Control and the State

Sumit Chakrabarti (Rabindra Bharati)
From ‘Corporation’ to ‘Crowd’: the rhetoric of control in the politics of West Bengal
[AUDIO HERE]

Önder Çelik (École Normale Supérieure)
Decentralization as a possible way of struggling against late capitalism: the case of Turkish Kurdistan
[AUDIO HERE]

Fabian Balardini (CUNY)
Taking Control and moving beyond the ‘extractivist’ model of development: socialist state-owned National Oil Companies and permanent profitability crisis in the global oil industry
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel C – questions.

Chair: Eleni Harlan

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Panel D: Utopian Horizons

Mao Xin (Kings)
Ethically rethinking utopia in the contemporary world – from a Levinasian perspective
[AUDIO HERE]

Michael Kimaid (Bowling Green State)
Toward a Resistance of Commodified Time and Space
[AUDIO HERE]

Andreas Wittel (Nottingham Trent)
Towards a Higher Education Commons
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel D – questions.

Chair: Matt Mahon

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Closing Roundtable

  • Peter Hallward (Kingston)
  • Alberto Toscano (Goldsmiths)
  • Paul Blackledge (Leeds Met)
  • David Graeber (Goldsmiths)
  • Bhaskar Mukhopadhyay (Goldsmiths)

Chair: Alexej Ulbricht

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Ewan Fernie – Mea Culpa: Measure for Measure and Complicity’ or ‘Shakespeare Found Me Out’

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 10th, 2011





Event date: 10 March 2011
The Shakespeare Institute
Mason Croft, Church Street
Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 6HP

Professor Ewan Fernie (Lecturer, Shakespeare Institute) –
Mea Culpa: Measure for Measure and Complicity’ or ‘Shakespeare Found Me Out

This paper will offer an argument for a more personal, existentially engaged kind of criticism.  And an extended reading of Angelo as a character capable of magnetising guilty self-knowledge which, in the end, isn’t purely and simply negative.

The Shakespeare Institute

An internationally renowned research institution established in 1951 to push the boundaries of knowledge about Shakespeare Studies and Renaissance Drama. The Shakespeare Institute offers a wide range of innovative postgraduate degrees, including postgraduate research.

During the Autumn and Spring terms, the Institute runs a series of Thursday seminars which are given by members of staff and invited speakers. The Thursday Seminars for the Spring Term 2011 are listed below. The seminars start at 2.00pm lasting approximately 45 minutes followed by a question and answer session. University of Birmingham staff and students, and guests are welcome to attend.

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Christopher Long – Thoughts on the Ground Plan: Spatial Ideas in Loos, Strnad, Frank, and Schindler

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 9th, 2011

Event Date: 9 March 2011 18:00 – 20:00
Keynes Library, 43 Gordon Square,
Birkbeck University,
London WC1H


Department of History of Art and Screen Media


Professor Christopher Long (University of Texas at Austin) –
Thoughts on the Ground Plan: Spatial Ideas in Loos, Strnad, Frank, and Schindler

During the first decades of the last century, Vienna was a fertile ground not only for discussions about the use and meaning of ornament in architecture, but also an important discourse concerning ideas of space, movement, and procession. This lecture will examine the works and ideas of four seminal thinkers—Adolf Loos, Oskar Strnad, Josef Frank, and R. M. Schindler—and how each contributed to modern conceptions of space-making.

Christopher Long is professor of architectural and design history at the University of Texas at Austin. He is the author of Josef Frank: Life and Work (2002), Paul T. Frankl and Modern American Design (2007), and The Looshaus (forthcoming).

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Paul Quigley – The American Civil War and the International Boundaries of Citizenship

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 8th, 2011

Event Date: 8 March 2011 17:30
McCrea 219


 

Royal Holloway Department of History


Dr Paul Quigley (University of Edinburgh) – The American Civil War and the International Boundaries of Citizenship

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Tony Wright – In defence of Politicians

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 7th, 2011

Event Date: 7 March 2011 18:30 – 20:00
B04 Birkbeck College,
Malet St LONDON WC1E


 

 

The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series


Professor Tony Wright (Department of Politics) - In defence of Politicians

Nobody seems to have a good word to say about politicians. But the fact is that politics needs politicians, so we have a duty – however difficult it may be at times – to defend them.

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