Jim Hurford – On Problems and Prospects in the Study of language Evolution

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 25th, 2011

Event date: 24 – 26 March 2011
Institute of Philosophy
University of London
Senate House
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

 

Expression and Expressive Communication


Professor Jim Hurford (Edinburgh) – On Problems and Prospects in the Study of language Evolution

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Slavoj Zizek – Masterclass – Lacan and Sexual Difference

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 25th, 2011

Event Date: 23, 25& 26 March 2011



Lacan and Sexual Difference


Slavoj ZizekMasterclass

While the global political and social situation is getting more and more explosive, emancipatory struggles are more and more hampered by ideological prejudices. This is why some ruthless clarifications are necessary.


Part I (23 March 2011)

Part III (26 March 2011)

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The Philosophy of Literature – The Intentional Act

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2011

Event date: 23 March 2011 17:00 – 19:00
Win1-04, Windsor Building 
Royal Holloway University

 

 

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC) at
Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The Philosophy of Literature




Organiser: Professor John O’Brien

During the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the characteristics of the philosophical approach to literature have undergone some important changes. Alongside the continuation of the traditions of Continental thought, representatively symbolized by the work of Badiou and Rancière, can be detected a move back to elements that were challenged 40 years ago by the generation of Barthes, Lacan, Foucault and Derrida. The death of the author is now being countered by the notion of the author as intentional subject; the disconnection between life and art-work is giving way to a new interest in biography; the notion of the self-contained work of art, or of art-as-textuality, is being displaced in favour of a view of literary language as a hard-wired element of human cognition. From Marion’s version of phenomenology to Currie’s Arts and Minds, the philosophy that might underlie literature is being re-appraised.

Session 3: The Intentional Act

  • Professor Colin Davis (French)

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  • Dr James Helgeson (French, Nottingham)

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  • Dr Tim Chesters (French)

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Slavoj Zizek – Masterclass – The Idea of Communism and its Actuality

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2011

Event Date: 23, 25 & 26 March 2011



Masterclass – The Idea of Communism and its Actuality

Slavoj Zizek

While the global political and social situation is getting more and more explosive, emancipatory struggles are more and more hampered by ideological prejudices. This is why some ruthless clarifications are necessary.



Part II (25 March 2011)

Part III (26 March 2011)

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introduction by Costas Douzinas .

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The Philosophy of Literature

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2011

Event date: 23 February-23 March 2011
Win1-04, Windsor Building 
Royal Holloway University

 

 

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC) at
Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The Philosophy of Literature




Organiser: Professor John O’Brien

During the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the characteristics of the philosophical approach to literature have undergone some important changes. Alongside the continuation of the traditions of Continental thought, representatively symbolized by the work of Badiou and Rancière, can be detected a move back to elements that were challenged 40 years ago by the generation of Barthes, Lacan, Foucault and Derrida. The death of the author is now being countered by the notion of the author as intentional subject; the disconnection between life and art-work is giving way to a new interest in biography; the notion of the self-contained work of art, or of art-as-textuality, is being displaced in favour of a view of literary language as a hard-wired element of human cognition. From Marion’s version of phenomenology to Currie’s Arts and Minds, the philosophy that might underlie literature is being re-appraised.

Session 1(23 February 2011) : The Intentional Subject

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Introduction: Professor John O’Brien
  • Professor Andrew Bowie (Philosophy)
  • Professor Dan Rebellato (Drama)


Session 2 (16 March 2011): (T)exteriors

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (English)
  • Dr Ruth Cruickshank (French)
  • Dr Clare Connors (English, UEA)


Session 3 (23 March 2011): The Intentional Act

[AUDIO HERE]

  • Professor Colin Davis (French)
  • Dr James Helgeson (French, Nottingham)
  • Dr Tim Chesters (French)
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Protected: Anne Carson – Uncle Falling

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 22nd, 2011

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Ruth Harvey – The Lady and the Song

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 22nd, 2011

Event Date: 22 March 2011
Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway
Egham TW 20 0EX



School of Modern Languages, Literatures & Cultures

Royal Holloway University of London

Inaugural Lecture


Professor Ruth Harvey (Professor of Medieval Occitan Literature) – The Lady and the Song

The medieval troubadours are best known for their creation of Courtly Love, a cultural transformation affecting the whole course of European literature and sensibilities. The idealised Lady addressed in their love-songs lacked voice or agency. In contrast, this lecture will focus on some of the many ways in which noblewomen actively nourished and exploited this cultural shift: as patrons, politicians, poets and critics.

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Introduction by Professor Geoff Ward (Vice-Principal Royal Holloway) .

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Simon Gaunt (King’s College, London) .

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Orbiting London – A Conversation with Iain Sinclair

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2011

Event Date: 21 March 2011
Room B36
Birkbeck College
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX


Orbiting London – A Conversation with Iain Sinclair


Iain Sinclair, writer, poet and film-maker, will discuss – in conversation with Iain Boal, (social historian and Fellow of the Institute for the Humanities) his four decades of chronicling the life of the capital. More than any contemporary author Sinclair’s work is suffused with the spirit of place, of London as a palimpsest, in particular the environs of Hackney, his home since the mid-60s. Sinclair’s books include Downriver, Rodinsky’s Room, London Orbital, Lights out for the Territory, London: City of Disappearances, Hackney: That Rose-Red Empire.

Iain Boal (BIH Research Fellow) is a social historian of science and technics, with a special interest in visual culture, public space and the commons. Educated in the British Isles, he moved to the US in 1982, where he has taught at Harvard, Stanford and the University of California, in the Geography Dept at Berkeley and Community Studies at Santa Cruz. He is associated with Retort, a group of writers, artists and artisans based for two decades in the San Francisco Bay Area. With James Brook he edited Resisting the Virtual Life: The Culture and Politics of Information (City Lights). He is the author, with T.J. Clark, Joseph Matthews and Michael Watts, of Retort’s Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War (Verso). He is co-editor of West of Eden: Communes and Utopia in Northern California (PM Press, 2011), and his brief history of the bicycle in planetary perspective, The Green Machine, is forthcoming from Notting Hill Editions. In 2005/6 he was a Guggenheim Fellow in Science and Technology.

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Susan James – Imagining Political Consensus

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2011

Event Date: 21 March 2011
Room B36
Birkbeck College,
Malet St
LONDON WC1E

 

The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Susan James (Department of Philosophy) – Imagining Political Consensus

An image of political consensus plays a large role in political philosophy. But it does not seem to be realisable. How, then, should we think about it? In this lecture I’ll discuss some historical and contemporary answers.

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Jasmine Gideon – Social Policy and Social Reproduction: Reflections from the Chilean Case

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


Social Policy and Social Reproduction:

Reflections from the Chilean Case

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Jasmine Gideon (Birkbeck College) - Social Policy and Social Reproduction: Reflections from the Chilean Case

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