Karen Wells – The place of children and childhood in social reproduction

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


The place of children and childhood in social reproduction

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Karen Wells (Birkbeck College) - The place of children and childhood in social reproduction

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Sam Punch – Young Migrant Livelihoods and Youth Transitions in Bolivia

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


Young Migrant Livelihoods and Youth Transitions in Bolivia


 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Sam Punch (University of Stirling) - Young Migrant Livelihoods and Youth Transitions in Bolivia

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Penny Vera-Sanso – Social reproduction: an expanding reliance on older people?

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


Social reproduction: an expanding reliance on older people?

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Penny Vera-Sanso (Birkbeck College) - Social reproduction: an expanding reliance on older people?

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Tanja Bastia – Social reproduction across space: reconciling mobility and care

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


Social reproduction across space:

reconciling mobility and care

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Tanja Bastia (University of Manchester) - Social reproduction across space: reconciling mobility and care

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Nicola Yeates – Global care chains (GCCs): a state-of-the-art review and future directions

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


Global care chains (GCCs): a state-of-the-art

review and future directions

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

Nicola Yeates (Open University) - Global care chains (GCCs): a state-of-the-art review and future directions

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The political economy of social reproduction across the lifecourse: global perspectives

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2011

Event Date: 18 March 2011
Birkbeck College Upper Meeting Room
36 Gordon Square
London WC1 E


The political economy of social reproduction across the lifecourse:

global perspectives

 

The concept ‘social reproduction’ refers to the structural inequalities that mark the distribution of the material resources necessary to reproduce and sustain human life. This half day seminar seeks to renew the concept of social reproduction by interrogating it from the perspectives of different life stages and from diverse positionings within the global economy. How is social reproduction to be understood within the current context of globalisation? How does global competition, HIV, feminisation of migration, limited safety nets, increased longevity and changing expectations of different life stages impact on social production? Do, for instance, female migration, transnational households and ‘global care chains’ reliant on grandparent and children’s labour to replace that of female migrants require a renewed conceptualisation of social reproduction? Are economic reform programmes, the global financial crisis, and increasing pauperisation exacerbating the ‘squeeze on care’, commoditising social reproduction or changing the relations of care within families and societies as well as between countries? If the relations of care and support are changing, what are the policy implications?

introduction.

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The Philosophy of Literature – (T)exteriors

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 16th, 2011

Event date: 16 March 2011 17:00 – 19:00
Win1-04, Windsor Building
Royal Holloway University

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre (HARC) at
Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The Philosophy of Literature



 

Organiser: Professor John O’Brien

During the 1990s and the first decade of the 21st century, the characteristics of the philosophical approach to literature have undergone some important changes. Alongside the continuation of the traditions of Continental thought, representatively symbolized by the work of Badiou and Rancière, can be detected a move back to elements that were challenged 40 years ago by the generation of Barthes, Lacan, Foucault and Derrida. The death of the author is now being countered by the notion of the author as intentional subject; the disconnection between life and art-work is giving way to a new interest in biography; the notion of the self-contained work of art, or of art-as-textuality, is being displaced in favour of a view of literary language as a hard-wired element of human cognition. From Marion’s version of phenomenology to Currie’s Arts and Minds, the philosophy that might underlie literature is being re-appraised.

Session 2: (T)exteriors

  • Professor Robert Eaglestone (English)

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  • Dr Ruth Cruickshank (French)

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  • Dr Clare Connors (English, UEA)

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Protected: Barry Bergdoll – Out of Site, in Plain View: the Modernity of the Architecture Exhibition since 1750

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 16th, 2011

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Part Time Students are Special: Recent Research Findings

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 14th, 2011

Event Date: 14 March 2011 18:30 – 20:00
Room B04, Birkbeck College
LONDON WC1E



The Importance of Being Human

A series of lectures from the School of Social Science, History and Philosophy

SSHP Spring Public Lecture series

 

Professor Claire Callender and Anne Jamieson, Department of Social Policy and Education

Claire Callender and Anne Jamieson present their latest research findings on part-time students , their backgrounds and choices.

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Introduction by Professor Sue Jackson
(Birkbeck Institute for Life-long Learning) .
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Part One:
Professor Clare Callender

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Part Two:
Dr Anne Jamieson

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Protected: Suzanne Spicer – Interpreting Learning for All Framework & Providing Formal and Informal Education Services

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 14th, 2011

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