Sites of Power: The City of Granada as Cultural Icon

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 29th, 2011




Event Date: 29 & 30 April 2011
The Latimer Room
Clare College, Cambridge

 

Department of Spanish and Portuguese
Modern & Medieval Languages Present:

Norman MacColl Symposium Easter Term 2011

Sites of Power: The City of Granada as Cultural Icon


PROGRAMME

Friday 29 April

Introduction by Elizabeth Drayson.

Opening address by Don José María Guadalupe Guerrero,
Concejal Delegado de Relaciones Internacionales, Ayuntamiento de Granada.

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Dr Mercedes Castillo Ferreira (University of Jaén):
Música y contrarreforma en la abadía del Sacromonte de Granada


Dr Robert Irwin (School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London):
Andalusia, the orientalist portal


MacColl Lecture:Professor Luis F. Bernabé Pons (University of Alicante):
Sólo Dios es vencedor: imágenes especulares de Granada y sus moriscos

Members of the Choir of Clare College perform a short concert of music from
Counter-Reformation Granada (n.b. in Clare College Chapel)


Saturday 30 April

Dr María Luisa García Valverde (University of Granada):
Religión y cultura en la Granada del Antiguo Régimen: La Abadía del Sacro Monte

Dr Tess Knighton (Clare College, University of Cambridge):
The road to Granada: royal ritual in and around the ‘Capilla Real’

Dr Amira Bennison (University of Cambridge):
The city as a site of power in the Islamic West: The Alhambra (Madīnatal-Ḥamrā’) of the Nasrids and New Fes (Madīnat al-Bayḍā’)

Convenor: Dr Elizabeth Drayson.


The Department of Spanish and Portuguese would like to thank the Embassy of Spain Office
for Cultural and Scientific Affairs for their generous contribution to the sponsorship of this event
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Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 29th, 2011

…………….……………..


Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory



PROGRAMME

DAY 1: FRIDAY 29 APRIL 2011

Opening Remarks,  Richard J. Aldrich (University of Warwick).

Panel 1a: Origins: OSS and the rebirth of the CIA

Chair: Dr Kaeten Mistry (University of Warwick)

Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones (University of Edinburgh)
“The Origins of the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Richard Immerman (Temple University)
“From the OSS to the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Nick Cullather (Indiana University)
“The CIA, the culture of intelligence failure, and the Bogotazo episode of 1948’
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 1b: The CIA, Television and Film

Chair/Discussant: Professor Tony Shaw (University of Hertfordshire)

Simon Willmetts (University of Warwick)
“Hitchcock and the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr Trevor McCrisken (University of Warwick)
“The CIA and American Television” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 2a: The CIA in the early Cold War

Chair: Dr Helen Laville (University of Birmingham)

Dr David Robarge (CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence)
“Origins and Development of the CIA Paramilitary function in the early Cold War”
(AUDIO HERE)

Professor Hugh Wilford (California State University Long Beach)
“America’s Great Game: The CIA and the Arab World in the Early Cold War”
(AUDIO HERE)

Laura Moorhead (Independent Scholar)
“Norwood Allman, the CIA and Representations of Intelligence”
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 2b: The CIA and their friends

Chair: Professor David Stafford (University of Edinburgh)

Professor Cees Wiebes (NcTB Netherlands)
“Oh my God, the Dutch did it again” : The Dutch-CIA intelligence liaison ”
(AUDIO HERE)

Peer Henrik Hansen (Cold War Museum, Denmark)
“Cooperation, complications and covert operations: CIA and Danish Intelligence, 1946-63”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Stefania Paladini (Coventry University) –
Viewed by the Allies: The Agency’s (mis)perception in Italy
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 2c: The CIA and American Faction and Fiction and the Press

Chair/Discussant: Professor Wesley Wark (University of Toronto)

Professor Fred Hitz (University of Virginia)
” The Myths and Reality of Espionage” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Jonathan Nashel (University of South Bend, Indiana)
“Ian Fleming and Allen Dulles: Facts, Fictions, and Empires”

Professor Richard J. Aldrich (University of Warwick)
“Renegades and Outriders: The CIA and Journalism” (AUDIO HERE)

Keynote Speech

Chair: Professor Shearer West (Director of Research, Arts and Humanities Research Council)

Shearer West introduces Robert Jervis.

Professor Robert Jervis (Columbia University)
“Why the CIA Doesn’t Do Better” (AUDIO HERE)

Panel 3a: The CIA, declassification, and the Foreign Relations of the United States series

Chair: Professor Richard Immerman (Temple University)

Ted Keefer (former general editor of the Foreign Relations of the United States series, Office of the Historian, State Department)
“The Foreign Relations series and secrecy” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Robert J. McMahon (Mershon Center, Ohio State University)
“The CIA and the FRUS series: the Indonesian case” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr Paul McGarr (University of Nottingham)
“’Playing Games with History’: The State Department, the CIA, and the FRUS series”
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 3b: Lost landscapes

Chair/Discussant: Dr Steve Hewitt (University of Birmingham)

Dr Zakia Shiraz (University of Warwick)
“White Out: The CIA and the Drugs Debate” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr Helen Laville (University of Birmingham)
“Women and the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr Dominik Smyrgala (Faculty of International Relations, Collegium Civitas, Warsaw, Poland)
“The CIA and the Polish Cold War Film and Literature” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 3c: The changing roles of the CIA and the globalisation of intelligence

Chair/Discussant: Professor Scott Lucas (University of Birmingham)
Eugene S. Poteat, AFIO
“The Ever-Changing Role of the CIA: From OSS Covert Operations, to Analysis, to High-Tech and Back”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Adam Svendsen (Research Consultant)
“The CIA and the Globalisation of Intelligence” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

After dinner speaker:

Richard J. Aldrich introduces Chirs Andrew.

Professor Chris Andrew (Corpus Christi College, Cambridge)
“’The CIA and US Intelligence: the view from Moscow and London”
(AUDIO HERE)


DAY 2: SATURDAY 30 APRIL 2011


Panel 4a: Cuba, the Bay of Pigs, and the CIA

Chair: Professor Randall B. Woods (University of Arkansas)

Professor Peter Kornbluh (National Security Archive)
“Cuba, the Bay of Pigs and the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

James Perry (Senior Analyst, Northrop Grumman)
‘The Necessary Failure: the Bay of Pigs in Global Context”
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 4b: The CIA, Memoirs and Secrecy

Chair/Discussant: Dr David Robarge (CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence)

Professor Mark Fenster
“Varieties of Deference to ‘Extraordinary Needs’: CIA and Secrecy in the Courts”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Chris Moran (University of Warwick)
“Memories and Memoirs” (AUDIO HERE)

John Hollister Hedley (former chairman of CIA Publications Review Board)
“The CIA and the review of publications by CIA authors”
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 4c: The CIA and intelligence assessment in historical perspective

Chair: Ted Keefer (former general editor of the Foreign Relations of the United States series, Office of the Historian, State Department)

Professor Len Scott (Aberystwyth University)
“The CIA and the Cuban Missile Crisis” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr David Milne (University of East Anglia)
“Excessive Optimism and the politicization of intelligence on Vietnam”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Robert McNamara (University of Ulster)
“US intelligence assessments and the ‘Unholy alliance’ of Southern Africa c. 1960-80”
(AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 5a: The CIA in the era of the Nixon administration

Chair: Professor Peter Kornbluh (National Security Archive)

Dr Christian Gustafson (Brunel University)
“Nixon, Kissinger, the CIA, and Chile” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Randall B. Woods (University of Arkansas)
“William E. Colby and the CIA” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 5b: The CIA and the post-Cold War world

Chair/Discussant: Dr Steve Hewitt (University of Birmingham)

Dr Stephen Marrin (Brunel University)
“The CIA’s analysis in the post-Cold War World”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Maria Ryan (University of Nottingham)
“‘Wilful Blindness or Blissful Ignorance? The United States and the Successful Denuclearisation of Iraq’”
(AUDIO HERE)

Tony Field (University of Warwick)
“The CIA and counter-terrorism intelligence” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 5c: CIA Operations and the question of Covert Action

Chair/Discussant: Professor Rhodri Jeffreys-Jones (University of Edinburgh)

Dr David Robarge (CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence)
“CIA Covert Action and Democracy” (AUDIO HERE)

Dr David Ryan (University College, Cork)
“Mining Nicaragua’s Harbours and Undermining CIA Recovery ”
(AUDIO HERE)

John Prados (National Security Archive)
“Whither Covert Operations?” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Plenary address.

Chair: Professor Richard J. Aldrich (University of Warwick)

Richard J. Aldrich introduces Wesley Wark.

Professor Wesley Wark (University of Toronto)
“The CIA and Western Culture” (AUDIO HERE)

Panel 6a: Counter-intelligence and the Soviet Bloc

Chair/Discussant: Gill Bennett

Hayden Peake
“On the Origins of Cold War Counterintelligence in the United States”
(AUDIO HERE)

Professor Jonathan Haslam (University of Cambridge)
“Soviet counter-intelligence against US operations in Moscow”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Paul Maddrell (Aberystwyth University)
“The CIA and the GDR in the Cold War” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 6b: Cultural encounters

Chair/Discussant: Professor Fred Hitz (University of Virginia)

Dr Jason Harding (School of Advanced Study, University of London)
“The CIA and Encounter magazine” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Kathryn Olmsted (UC Davis)
“The CIA and Conspiracy Theories” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Panel 6c: Technical Collection, and the National Estimating System

Chair/Discussant: Cees Wiebes (NcTB Netherlands)

Dr Matthew Aid (National Security Archive)
“The CIA sigint programme and  its relations with the NSA”
(AUDIO HERE)

Chris Pocock (author and defense editor)
“The Black Bats: Covert Air Operations over China from Taiwan, 1951-1969”
(AUDIO HERE)

Dr Philip Davies (Brunel University)
“The CIA versus the NIE” (AUDIO HERE)

discussion.

Roundtable panel 7a: The CIA and declassification

Chair: Dr Matthew Aid (National  Security Archive)

Dr David Robarge (CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence)
“Recent CIA initiatives in the field” (AUDIO HERE)

Professor Nick Cullather (Indiana University)

Professor Mark Fenster (University of Florida)

Professor Richard Immerman (Temple University)

Dr Paul McGarr (University of Nottingham)

Professor Robert J. McMahon (Mershon Center, Ohio State University)

(Roundtable AUDIO HERE)

Roundtable panel 7b: The CIA and post-war American culture

Chair/Discussant: Professor Scott Lucas (University of Birmingham)

Professor Fred Hitz (University of Virginia)

Professor Peter Kornbluh (National Security Archive)

Professor Jonathan Nashel (University of South Bend, Indiana)

Professor Wesley Wark (University of Toronto)

Professor Hugh Wilford (California State University, Long Beach)

(Roundtable AUDIO HERE)

closing lecture

Professor Richard J. Aldrich (University of Warwick)
“The History of GCHQ” CONFIDENTIAL (NOT RECORDED)

Postgraduate panels sponsored by the Eccles Centre at the British Library are here (click)

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Nina Parish – Digital Communities: Literature and the Internet in France

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 27th, 2011

Event Date: 31 January 2011
43 Gordon Square 
Birkbeck College 
LONDON WC1E


Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) presents:

Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) exists in order to bring together academics from a range of disciplines (literature, philosophy, film and visual culture, fine art, sociology, linguistics, history, psychology) to discuss these questions and to engage in crucial debates around what constitutes ‘belonging’ in the so-called post-modern era. How have bonds between humans – real, ideal and sometimes imaginary – been lived, represented and conceptualised over the centuries? How have those bonds mutated across time and space? How might humans today and in the future be bound together “differently”? What prevents the realisation of bonds as yet unnamed? How might the various strands of the Arts and Humanities contribute to a new understanding of forms of relation and living together?

At BRAKC we run regular symposia, seminars, film screenings, a termly reading group, all devoted to exploring visions – old and new – of kinship and community. Our aim is to bring together theory and practice, art and empiricism, ethics and aesthetics, in order to pursue an ongoing academic project whose only rule is its collective refusal to conclude that “there is no such thing as society”.

Contact BRAKC Directors, Dr. Andrew Asibong and Dr. Nathalie Wourm, at brrkc@sllc.bbk.ac.uk

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Dr Nina Parish (University of Bath): 
Digital Communities: Literature and the Internet in France

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accompanying images:

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Think Global – Hate Local – conference page

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 15th, 2011

Event Date: 15 April 2011
Sunley Management Centre
Park Campus, University of Northampton



Radicalism and New Media Group presents:

Think Global – Hate Local

 

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  • Symposium to be held at Sunley Management Centre Park Campus, University of Northampton
  • Keynote lecture by Professor Nigel Copsey
  • Featuring panels from: National Coordinator for Domestic Extremism (NCDE) & Hope not Hate
  • With academic analysis by: Dr Matthew Feldman, Dr Paul Jackson & Dr Graham Macklin

Far-right ideologies revel in diagnoses of both national and global crisis. Yet they also give clear shape and form to this sense of crisis by developing localised interpretations of their grievances. Examining the synthesis of the global and the local, this one-day symposium brings together public-facing academic analysis with a range of front-line practitioners. Building on the one-day symposium Fascist Radicalism and the New Media, Think Global, Hate Local will allow a variety of expert voices to explore relationships between extremist critiques of global politics and localised pockets of far-right extremism.

Presentations will focus on a variety of far-right organisations in Britain, from the English Defence League and the British National Party to extreme right-wing vanguard movements. The role of new media, and especially the links between online and offline behaviour, will be examined by speakers. Networking opportunities will be combined with keynote talks and panel discussions at this fully catered, one-day event.

For further details, please contact:

Dr Mathew Feldman

Dr Paul Jackson

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Welcome Address

Chris Moore, Dean of School of Social Sciences .

Dr Matthew Feldman, Director of the Radicalism and New Media Group

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Keynote Talk:

Professor Nigel Copsey (University of Teesside):
Sustaining a Mortal Blow? The British National Party, the 2010 General and Local Elections, and After
[AUDIO HERE]

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Panel 1: Discourses of Hate and the British Far-Right

Professor Raphael Cohen-Almagor, University of Hull
Hate on the Internet  [AUDIO HERE]

Dr Paul Jackson (University of Northampton):
Colin Jordan: The Universal Nazi [AUDIO HERE]

Gerry Gable, MA Crim. (Hope not Hate Campaign)
Lone Wolves: Myth or Reality? An Overview [AUDIO HERE]

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Panel 2: Campaigning Against Contemporary British Extremism

Sonia Gable, Deputy Editor Searchlight
The British National Party’s Finances [AUDIO HERE]

Graeme Atkinson, European Editor Searchlight
Hands Across the Water: the UK Far-Right’s Friends in Europe
AUDIO NOT AVAILABLE

Matthew Collins, Searchlight: The English Defence League in Focus
AUDIO NOT AVAILABLE

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Panel 3: National Coordinator for Domestic Extremism

The Defence League from a Policing Perspective
AUDIO NOT AVAILABLE

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Étienne Balibar – Eleven Theses on Marx and Marxism

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 14th, 2011



Event Date: 14 April 2011
Swedenborg Hall


 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy
(CRMEP) presents


Professor Étienne Balibar(University of Paris X and Irvine, University of California) –
Eleven Theses on Marx and Marxism

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Introduction by Peter Osborne .

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talk:

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questions:

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download handout: Eleven Theses

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The Philosophy of Marx
by Étienne Balibar

available at Verso











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Lesley Pullen – Naga Material Culture: 1826-2008

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 14th, 2011

Event date: 14 April 2011
Location:Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way

London NW1 2HD



Mrs Lesley Pullen, MA (School of Oriental and African Studies)
Naga Material Culture: 1826-2008

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talk:

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questions:

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accompanying images:

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Mairéad Hanrahan – Genet after Derrida

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 11th, 2011

Event Date 11 April 2011
Swedenborg Hall, 20-21
Bloomsbury Way
London, WC1A 2TH

 

Professor Maiéad Hanrahan (UCL) – Genet after Derrida

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Is the Alternative Vote worth voting for?

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 11th, 2011

Event Date: 11 April 2011
Bloomsbury Theatre
15 Gordon Street
London WC1H 0AH


The UCL Constitution Unit and the Centre for British Politics & Public Life at Birkbeck College present:

Is the Alternative Vote worth voting for?

A debate on the AV referendum


The UK faces its first national referendum for over 30 years and has an unprecedented opportunity to change the voting system and reshape the future political landscape. The referendum also raises profound questions about electoral reform in the UK. This debate will provide an opportunity to discuss the arguments underpinning electoral reform and the AV system and to hear speakers from both sides of the argument, as well as insights from an expert panel.

Speaking in favour of a ‘yes‘ vote:

  • Billy Bragg (singer and political campaigner)
  • Peter Facey (Chair, Unlock Democracy)

Speaking in favour of a ‘no‘ vote:

  • Jane Kennedy (National Organiser of Labour) No to AV
  • Charlotte Vere (Finance Director / National Organiser) ‘No to AV’

Expert panel:

  • Professor Justin Fisher (Magna Carta Institute, Brunel University)
  • Peter Kellner (YouGov)
  • Dr Alan Renwick (University of Reading)
  • Professor Tony Wright (UCL Constitution Unit and Department of Politics, Birkbeck College)
  • Chaired by Professor Robert Hazell (UCL Constitution Unit)

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debate:

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questions:

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Keith Thomas – Heritage or History? Conflicting Views of the Past

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 6th, 2011

Event date: 1 March 2011
Windsor Auditorium,
Royal Holloway, Egham



Royal Holloway Department of History

Hayes Robinson Lecture


Professor Sir Keith Thomas (University of Oxford)
Heritage or History? Conflicting Views of the Past

 

Hayes Robinson Lecture Each year in March a distinguished international historian is invited to give the Hayes Robinson lecture, in celebration of History at Royal Holloway. The lecture series was re-launched in 1992/3, under a benefaction from the estate of Margaret Hayes Robinson. She was a congenial and inclusive Head of Royal Holloway’s History Department (1899-1911) in the days when higher education for women was still being pioneered; and it is appropriate that, one hundred years later, her legacy is being used to bring people together to enjoy the latest historical research, presented in accessible style.

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talk:

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vote of thanks by Professor Francis Robinson .

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Quentin Tarantino and Cinema’s Other Enjoyment

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 4th, 2011


Event Date: 4 April 2011
Institute for Contemporary Arts
The Mall
London SW1Y 5AH


Quentin Tarantino and Cinema’s Other Enjoyment


The London Graduate School and the London Society for the New Lacanian School present a Symposium on Quentin Tarantino and psychoanalysis beyond the paternal principle.1-6pm 4th April, Institute for Contemporary Arts, The Mall, London

‘Daddy’s dead. Noooo!’ (Tarantino, from Dusk Till Dawn) Tarantino’s movies frequently turn on the abjection of a paternal figure (Marcellus Wallace, Jacob Fuller, Bill, Stuntman Mike), who loses his place and authority to become a redundant figure of consumption and expenditure. Tarantino’s movies themselves, in their restless play of reflexive images and references, are always seeking to produce the maximum in cinematic affect irrespective of the aesthetic unities of generic form, symbolic consistency, realism. This symposium explores the suggestion that Tarantino’s movies best symptomatise a tendency in Hollywood generally where cinema is no longer a vehicle of (anti)Oedipal desire, but a febrile, speculative generator of thrills, pleasures and anxieties swarming along an accelerating death drive which is itself death proof. In Tarantino’s film of the same name, for example, the impotence of itinerant ex-stuntman Mike is the condition of a romance between two iconic automobiles, vehicles not of male potency but an altogether Other jouissance.

INTRODUCTION
Véronique Voruz (the London Society of the New Lacanian School) .

TARANTINO’s GIRLS
Gérard Wajcman (writer, psychoanalyst, curator and art critic. He teaches at the Department of Psychoanalysis of Paris 8 University and is a member of the École de la Cause Freudienne and the World Association of Psychoanalysis)
read by Scott Wilson
[AUDIO HERE]

POST-PHALLIC LIBIDINAL ECONOMIES
Hager Weslati (London Graduate School, Kingston University)
[AUDIO HERE]

SCREEN, DRIVE, ROMANCE
Fred Botting (London Graduate School, Kingston University, co- author of the Tarantinian Ethics (Sage, 2001))
[AUDIO HERE]

PSYCHE, THAT INGLOURIOUS BASTERD
Scott Wilson (London Graduate School, Kingston University, co- author of the Tarantinian Ethics (Sage, 2001))
[AUDIO HERE]

TOUGH LOVE
Marie-Hélène Brousse (practising psychoanalyst in Paris, a member of the École de la Cause freudienne and of the World Association of Psychoanalysis)
[AUDIO HERE]

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