David Robarge – Recent CIA initiatives in the field

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Dr David Robarge (CIA Center for the Study of Intelligence) – Recent CIA initiatives in the field

David Robarge is the chief historian of the Central Intelligence Agency and has been a member of the agency’s history staff since 1996. Before that he worked in the C.I.A. Counterterrorism Center and the Directorate of Intelligence as an analyst on the Palestinian and Iraq accounts. He has published a classified biography of Director of Central Intelligence John McCone, and his articles and book reviews have appeared in the C.I.A.’s in-house journal “Studies in Intelligence,” and in “Intelligence and National Security” and the “Journal of Intelligence History.” Dr. Robarge holds a Ph.D. in American history from Columbia University, has taught United States intelligence history at George Mason University and has written a biography of Chief Justice John Marshall.

Contact details: Center for the Study of Intelligence, Washington DC 20005, USA

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Philip Davies – The CIA versus the NIE

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Dr Philip Davies (Brunel University) – The CIA versus the NIE

One of the most common misunderstandings in intelligence literature is the common view that National Intelligence Estimates are a CIA product, or at least were prior to the 2004 Intelligence Reorganization and Terrorism Prevention Act. In fact NIE’s have been produced formally outside CIA since 1965 and the Agency’s relationship with national assessments has been one of the most persistently troubled aspects of the US intelligence community since the modern system’s inception in the mid-1940s. Not only did the production of NIEs embody and drive interagency divisions and rivalries in what Amy Zegart has evocatively called the ‘intelligence cacophany’ it was also one of a number of increasingly significant wedges steadily driven between the Director of Central Intelligence and CIA by the DCI’s dual role as chief of the Agency as well as head of the intelligence community as a whole. This paper examines three critical steps in the progressive divorce of NIE production from CIA and its transfer to the Office of the DCI in order to try credibly cast the NIE as a ‘community’ rather than ‘agency’ product that culminated in the eventual establishment of the National Intelligence Officers in 1974 and the National Intelligence Council. The three points examined in this paper are the 1949 Dulles-Jackson-Correa review, the 1952 establishment of the Office and Board of National Estimates and finally the 1965 transfer of the ONE/BNE machine from CIA to the ODCI.

Dr. Philip H.J. Davies is Director of the Brunel University Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies (BCISS) which he co-founded in 2003 and then served as then Deputy as its Deputy-Director until 2008. He recently led Brunel’s participation in the production of the UK’s new military Joint Intelligence Doctrine (JDP 2-00) and innovative joint doctrine on Understanding (JDP 04 in partnership with Defence Intelligence and the MoD’s Development, Concepts and Doctrine Centre. He has published extensively on the organisation and management of intelligence institutions initially with a study of the UK’s Secret Intelligence Service (MI6 and the Machinery of Spying (T&F 2004)) and most recently completed a 2-volume comparative study of national intelligence in Britain and the United States (Intelligence and Government in Britain and the United States (forthcoming in late 2011/early 2012 from Praeger Security International))11. He also developed Brunel’s innovative and highly subscribed MA in Intelligence and Security Studies and is currently heading Brunel’s participation in the EU-funded Leonardo da Vinci consortium on Competitive Intelligence in Trade and Export (CITEX).

Contact information: Brunel Centre for Intelligence and Security Studies, School of Social Sciences, Brunel University, Uxbridge, Middlesex, UB8 3PH, UK.

Email: philip.davies@brunel.ac.uk

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Matthew Aid – The CIA sigint programme and its relations with the NSA

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Dr Matthew Aid (National Security Archive) – The CIA sigint programme and its relations with the NSA

Even before the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) was created in 1947, it has had a contentious, and oftentimes acrimonious relationship with those U.S. military intelligence organizations that were engaged in the collection and processing of Signals Intelligence (SIGINT). Using newly declassified documents, this paper traces the CIA’s SIGINT collection efforts since 1947, which sometimes brought it into conflict with the National Security Agency (NSA), which since its creation in 1952 has been the U.S. intelligence community’s principal SIGINT collection and analytic organization.

Matthew M. Aid is a native of New York City and the author of The Secret Sentry: The Untold History of the National Security Agency (NY: Bloomsbury Press, 2009), and a forthcoming history of the U.S. intelligence community during the Obama administration, due to be published in early 2012. He is also the co-editor with Dr. Cees Wiebes of Secrets of Signals Intelligence During the Cold War and Beyond (London: Frank Cass, 2001), and the author of a number of published chapters and articles on intelligence and security matters, focusing primarily on issues relating to the National Security agency and Signals Intelligence (SIGINT).

Contact details: National Security Archive, Suite 701, Gelman Library, The George Washington University, 2130 H Street, NW, Washington, D.C., 20037, USA.

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Jason Harding – The CIA and Encounter magazine

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Dr Jason Harding (School of Advanced Study, University of London) - The CIA and Encounter magazine

The CIA and Encounter magazine This paper examines the rise and fall of Encounter magazine as the Congress of Cultural Freedom’s flagship periodical during the height of the Cold War. It looks closely at Michael Josselson’s founding of this London-based intellectual review, its covert funding by the CIA, his fractious relationships with successive American and British co-editors, and his response to the public unmasking of the CIA’s role as paymaster. Particular attention will be paid to notable critics of the journal – Dwight MacDonald, William Empson and Conor Cruise O’Brien.

Jason Harding is Reader in English Studies at Durham University and a Visiting Research Fellow at the School of Advanced Study, University of London. He is the author of a book on interwar British intellectual journalism The Criterion (OUP, 2002) and is currently researching a book on Encounter magazine and the Cultural Cold War.

Contact information: Department of English Studies, Elvet Riverside, New Elvet Durham DH1 3JT, UK

Email: jason.harding@durham.ac.uk

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Chris Pocock – The Black Bats: Covert Air Operations over China from Taiwan, 1951-1969

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Chris Pocock (author and defense editor) - The Black Bats: Covert Air Operations over China from Taiwan, 1951-1969

The history of CIA-sponsored intelligence flights flown over China by Taiwanese pilots is one of the last unexplored frontiers in the history of Cold War aerial intelligence. Drawing upon US and Taiwanese archival documents and oral history interviews with participants, Chris Pocock will discuss the heretofore untold story of the Black Bat Squadron.

Chris Pocock’s interest in aerial espionage started in the early 1970s with a visit to Davis-Monthan AFB, then the home of the U.S. Air Force wing that flew the unique U-2 spyplane. In 1989, his first book, Dragon Lady – A History of the U-2 Spyplane, received critical acclaim. He continued to follow the history and current operations of this long-lasting aircraft, and was instrumental in ensuring that an original U-2C aircraft was preserved and transferred to the Imperial War Museum, Duxford, UK. He was invited to fly in the U-2 in 1997 — the first foreign civilian to do so. His book, The U-2 Spyplane: Toward the Unknown, was published in 2000, after which the CIA’s chief historian described him as “today’s foremost authority on the U-2 and its development.” His definitive work, 50 Years of the U-2, was published in August 2005 to mark the aircraft’s golden anniversary. His latest book, The Black Bats (with Clarence Fu) is another story of aerial espionage during the Cold War, that has never been told before. Chris Pocock lecturers to postgraduate academic courses, on technical intelligence-gathering during in the Cold War.

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Wesley K. Wark – The CIA and Western Culture

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION: The CIA and Western Culture


“The Popular Culture of Espionage: From the Great White Spy Chief to the End of Faction”

Wesley Wark is a professor at the University of Toronto’s Munk School of Global Affairs, where he has taught since 1988, and is also a visiting research professor at the University of Ottawa’s Graduate School of Public and International Affairs.

He is Past-President of the Canadian Association for Security and Intelligence Studies (1998-2000 and 2004-2006). He served for two terms on the Prime Minister’s National Advisory Council on National Security (2005-2009) and served on the Advisory Committee to the President of the Canada Border Services Agency from 2006 to 2010.

He is the author of a classified history of the Canadian intelligence community in the Cold War, which is being prepared for publication, and is writing a study of contemporary Canadian national security policy and counter-terrorism. Professor Wark has published extensively in the field of intelligence and security studies over the past 27 years.

Professor Wark writes and comments extensively for the Canadian and international media on issues relating to intelligence, national security and terrorism.

Professor Wark earned a B.A. from Carleton University (1975), an M.A. from Cambridge University (1977) and a Ph.D. from the London School of Economics (LSE) in 1984.

Brief synopsis:

The ensuring appeal of the popular culture of espionage has rested, since its origins, in its use of “faction,” the deliberate blurring of fiction and fact in its portrait of the spy as an agent of historical change and a figure of political import.

This address re-examines the nature of faction as a literary device, argues that its ‘end of history’ moment has come, and suggests that spy fiction and film need to be examined according to different criteria to understand their impact and significance.

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Kathryn Olmsted – The CIA and Conspiracy Theories

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Professor Kathryn Olmsted (UC Davis) - The CIA and Conspiracy Theories

Conspiracists accuse the CIA of participating in every imaginable conspiracy, from assassination plots and mind control to alien medical experiments and reptilian shape-shifting.  The most prevalent conspiracy theories are variations on Senator Frank Church’s famous 1975 description of the CIA as a “rogue elephant on a rampage,” bent on destruction and completely beyond the control of democratically elected leaders. However, it is not entirely fair to accuse the CIA of masterminding these conspiracies.  A careful study of the most notorious examples of CIA conspiracies since the 1960s reveals that the CIA has more often been the president’s lapdog than a rogue elephant. The conspiracies most dangerous to American democracy have been plotted not in CIA headquarters but in the oval office.

Kathryn Olmsted is a professor of history at the University of California, Davis.  She is the author of three books on citizen challenges to government secrecy: Challenging the Secret Government: The Post-Watergate Investigations of the CIA and FBI (North Carolina, 1996); Red Spy Queen: A Biography of Elizabeth Bentley (North Carolina, 2002); and Real Enemies: Conspiracy Theories and American Democracy, World War I to 9/11 (Oxford, 2009).  She specializes in the political and cultural history of twentieth-century America.

Contact information: History Department, One Shields Avenue, University of California, Davis, CA  95616 USA.

Email: ksolmsted@ucdavis.edu

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Paul Maddrell – The CIA and the GDR in the Cold War

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Dr Paul Maddrell (Aberystwyth University) – The CIA and the GDR in the Cold War

This paper uses the records of one division, Line IX, of the East German Ministry of State Security (MfS or Stasi) to examine the espionage of the Central Intelligence Agency in the German Democratic Republic (GDR) during the Cold War. These are important records which shed much new light on the Agency’s operations. Most importantly, they reveal its spies, which no other source does. They establish that the CIA was the most successful intelligence service running human sources to operate against the GDR. Most of its success it achieved in the 1950s and early 1960s. Thereafter, it increasingly left the collection of intelligence from human sources in East Germany to its close partner, the West German Federal Intelligence Service. The CIA achieved its success because it was very well funded, ambitious and skilful. Some of its spies were outstanding ones who belong in the First Division of any league table of covert human sources. The CIA’s espionage in the 1950s and early 1960s represents an extraordinary attempt to use human sources to achieve a wide-ranging understanding of the activities and plans of the East German and Soviet Communist regimes in East Germany.

Paul Maddrell is a lecturer in International Politics at Aberystwyth University, where he teaches courses on the history of twentieth-century German and Soviet international relations and intelligence history. He is the author of Spying on Science: Western Intelligence in Divided Germany, 1945-1961 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006), as well as many articles and book chapters on intelligence and German history. He is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society.

Contact information: Department of International Politics, Aberystwyth University, Penglais, Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3FE.

Email: ohm@aber.ac.uk

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Jonathan Haslam – Soviet counter-intelligence against US operations in Moscow

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Professor Jonathan Haslam (University of Cambridge) – Soviet counter-intelligence against US operations in Moscow

The paper outlines the role of Soviet counter-intelligence (in this case the 2nd Main Directorate of the KGB) in combating CIA operations in Moscow when the Americans began beefing up action on the ground in the Soviet Union under diplomatic cover. Operations against the main enemy are set against the overall tasks of the 2nd Main Directorate which were broadened and deepened with the accession of Yuri Andropov to chairmanship of the KGB in 1967. The work of the First Main Directorate’s Counter-Intelligence directorate is also considered, as this was focused exclusively on the external threat abroad. On the other side of the picture we see matters from the CIA standpoint, particularly troubled when Soviet penetration of both the agency and the FBI undercut the role of Moscow station in the 1980s. When set against noted achievements in the field of espionage from a distance (notably through high technology and via the Warsaw Pact allies, including penetration of the Soviet Group of Forces in Germany), the obvious question is whether humint operations on the ground were a practicable option that yielded much return.

Jonathan Haslam is a Fellow of Corpus Christi College and Professor of the History of International Relations at Cambridge University. He is also a Fellow of the British Academy. More recent work includes The Nixon Administration and the Death of Allende’s Chile: A Case of Assisted Suicide (Verso 2005). His latest book is Russia’s Cold War: From the October Revolution to the Fall of the Wall (Yale University Press 2011).

Contact information: Corpus Christi College, Cambridge CB2

Email: jgh1001@cam.ac.uk

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Hayden Peake – On the Origins of Cold War Counterintelligence in the United States

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2011

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Event Date: 29 April – 1 May 2011
East Midlands Conference Centre
University of Nottingham  
University Park
Nottingham NG7 2RJ



Landscapes of Secrecy: The CIA in History, Fiction and Memory


Hayden Peake - On the Origins of Cold War Counterintelligence in the United States

The paper examines the official treatment of 3 Soviet intelligence officers and one agent who defected to the United States prior to WWII.  The emphasis is on their handling and consequent impact on the development of US CI during and after the war.

Hayden Peake earned BS and MS degrees at the Rochester Institute of Technology and an MA at Georgetown University.  After a career in Army military intelligence he joined the CIA serving in the Directorates of Science & Technology and Operations, and is now the Curator of the Historical Intelligence Book Collection.  As an adjunct professor at the Defense Intelligence College, he taught counterintelligence analysis and history. He is the author of several books and articles on intelligence and contributes book reviews to the journal, Studies In Intelligence.

Contact information: Phone: 703-628-6229

Email: bkcollector@me.com

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