Jonathan Simon – From the Medical Model to the Humanitarian Crisis Model: California’s Prison Health Crisis and the Future of Imprisonment

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Jonathan Simon - From the Medical Model to the Humanitarian Crisis Model: California’s Prison Health Crisis and the Future of Imprisonment

Foucault’s Discipline and Punish was published in the United States in 1977 just as California’s prison system was undergoing an epochal shift. In the mid‐70’s it was reaching its 20th century low in terms of imprisonment rate as it pursued just the kind of community based rehabilitative penal practices Foucault would have predicted. However after a brief rerun of the late 18th century debates about punishment and justice, the state set itself on a course of rapid prison expansion that would see a quintupling of the prisoner population by the end of the century; and embraced a model of penality that would see therapy and rehabilitation shunted aside for maximum security incapacitation. In between these points we can discern two distinct penal regimes, and possibly the emergence of a third. Each reflects the continuing fertilization between the penal field and the health care field that Foucault demonstrated in Discipline and Punish. In the 1970s California prisons were still organized along a medical model in which penal techniques aimed at resolving individual diseases of the will. In the 1980s and 1990s California reorganized prisons around a model of quarantine in which prisons were expanded (and yet emptied of their therapeutic technologies of power) to contain a growing class of high risk Californians whose collective physical presence was deemed a threat to the community. The result has been a human rights catastrophe in which prisons are operated at 2 to 3 times the design capacity and inmates die weekly from routine unmet medical and mental health needs. Courts however have begun to intervene, ordering the state to reduce its prison population and restore adequate physical and mental treatment of the individual prisoner. Out of this, it is possible, a new model of imprisonment is emerging, one based on the global practice of humanitarian crisis medicine.

Jonathan Simon

http://governingthroughcrime.blogspot.com

Before joining the UC Berkeley School of Law Boalt Hall faculty in 2003, Simon was a professor at the University of Miami School of Law. Previously, he was an assistant professor at the University of Michigan from 1990 to 1992. He clerked for the Honorable Judge William C. Canby Jr. of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit (1988-89).

Simon teaches courses on criminal law, criminal justice, law and culture, risk and the law, and socio-legal studies. His scholarship concerns the role of criminal justice and punishment in modern societies, insurance and other contemporary practices of governing risk, the cultural lives of law, and the intellectual history of law and the social sciences. Simon is a faculty associate of the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice.

Simon is the author of “Poor Discipline: Parole and the Social Control of the Underclass,” 1890-1990 (1993) and the co-editor of “Embracing Risk: The Changing Culture of Insurance and Responsibility” (with Tom Baker, 2002) and “Cultural Analysis, Cultural Studies, and the Law: Moving Beyond Legal Realism” (with Austin Sarat, 2003); “After the War on Crime: Race, Democracy and the New Reconstruction” (with Mary Louise Frampton and Ian Haney Lopez, 2008). His most recent book is “Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear” (2007) winner of the 2008 Book Prize of the Sociology of Law section of the ASA and the 2010 Hindelang Prize of the American Society of Criminology.

Simon is a faculty associate of the Berkeley Center for Criminal Justice.

During the 2010 and 2011 academic year Simon has been a MacCormick Fellow and Leverhulme Visting Professor of Law at the University of Edinburgh School of Law. His latest project is a book on California’s medical/legal prison crisis titled, Mass Incarceration on Trial.

Governing through Crime: How the War on Crime Transformed American Democracy and Created a Culture of Fear, New York: Oxford University Press (2007) Issues in Legal Scholarship, Catastrophic Risks: Prevention, Compensation, and Recovery, Article 4, http://www.bepress.com/ils/iss10/art4/ (2007)

Parrhesiastic Accountability: Investigatory Commissions and Executive Power in an Age of Terror, 114 Yale. L. J. 1419 (2005)

Reversal of Fortune: The Resurgence of Individual Risk Assessment in Criminal Justice, 1 Annual Review of Law and Social Science 397-421 (2005)

Risk and Reflexivity: What Socio-Legal Studies Add to the Study of Risk and the Law, 57 Alabama Law Review 119-139 (2005)

Fearless Speech in the Killing State: The Power of Capital Crime Victim Speech, North Carolina Law Review, 82 N. Carolina. L. Rev. 1377 (2004)

Teaching Criminal Law in an Era of Governing through Crime, Saint Louis University Law Journal, 48 St. Louis U. L. J. 1313 (2004)

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Ben Golder – The Limits and Possibilities of a Foucauldian Politics of Rights

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Ben Golder - The Limits and Possibilities of a Foucauldian Politics of Rights

Ben Golder

Ben Golder is a Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at the University of New South Wales. He holds undergraduate law and English literature degrees from UNSW and a doctorate in legal theory from the University of London. Prior to joining the faculty, Ben taught law at the University of East London, University College London, Birkbeck College and New York University in London. His relevant publications on Foucault include:

Foucault’s Law (Abingdon: Routledge-Cavendish, 2009) (with Peter Fitzpatrick)

Michel Foucault: Law, Government, Rights ( ed. – Routledge, forthcoming in 2011)

Foucault and Law (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010) (ed. with Peter Fitzpatrick)

`The Distribution of Death: Notes Towards a Biopolitical Theory of Criminal Law`, in New Critical Legal Thinking: Law, Politics and the Political, ed by Matthew Stone, Illan Rua Wall and Costas Douzinas (London: Birkbeck Law Press, forthcoming 2011)

`Foucault`s Critical (Yet Ambivalent) Affirmation: Three Figures of Rights` (2011)

Social & Legal Studies (forthcoming) `What is an Anti-Humanist Human Right?` (2010) 16(5) Social Identities 651-668

‘Foucault and the Unfinished Human of Rights’ (2010) 6(3) Law, Culture and the Humanities 354-74

‘Foucault and the Incompletion of Law’ (2008) 21(3) Leiden Journal of International Law 747-63

‘Foucault and the Genealogy of Pastoral Power’ (2007) 10(2) Radical Philosophy Review 157-76

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Peter Miller – The Calculating Self

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Peter Miller - The Calculating Self

Over thirty years ago, it was said that we go in search of our selves through the genitals. Today, in contrast, we find who we are through the incessant calculations that we perform on our selves and others. This is no doubt to overstate things somewhat, but recent events in financial markets and their consequent impact on public services, combined with ongoing attempts to “modernise” public services, have given even greater prominence to the calculating self in all its manifestations.

If I can claim to have learned anything from the writings of Michel Foucault, it is the importance of exploring how ways of calculating go hand in hand with the shaping of subjectivity or forms of personhood. For some years now, along with others, I have been trying to explore how one particular set of governmental practices – which goes very roughly under the heading of accounting – has enabled the “calculated management of life” (Kurunmäki and Miller, 2006; Miller, 1994, 1998; Miller and O’Leary, 1987) . This adjustment or alignment between the accumulation and distribution of persons and their capacities on the one hand, and the accumulation and distribution of capital on the other, was at the heart of what Foucault called “bio‐power”. But, perhaps due to the long shadow cast by Marxism, this is something that has been relatively neglected by those working within and through “governmentality” (Miller and Rose, 2008; Rose and Miller, 1992).

I offer here four propositions that I have found helpful as a way of framing the sorts of questions that can be asked about this specific, albeit increasingly generalised modality of being and acting. Many (if not all) of these will be familiar to those who have been working in and around governmentality, but I want to suggest that they have a particular meaning when viewed in terms of the calculating self.

First, and in common with many other technologies of the self, to attend to the calculating self means attending to the possibilities for acting on oneself and on the actions of others. But, by abstracting from the substance of things, and by distilling substantively different kinds or classes of things into a single financial figure, a particular type of action is made possible here. It is one that allows the actions of “free” individuals to be linked, directly or indirectly, to the requirements of markets and the commensuration that they engender. The term “mediating instruments” (Miller, Kurunmäki and O’Leary, 2010; Miller and O’Leary, 2007) captures well this ability of the calculating self to carry within it at least a dual set of ideas, whether these pertain to science and the economy, or medicine and finance.

Second, a concern with the calculating self means paying attention to the particular ideas of personhood that are brought into play in all these attempts to act on the actions of others. It concerns what Nietzsche called the possibility of breeding an animal with the right to make promises, but again in a specific sense. This is not a matter of conducting investigations at the level of political theory, but within and across the lowly domain of administrative discourse and administrative science, where notions of “responsibility accounting”, “decision‐making” and much else besides have sought to impose a sort of moral constraint or template on the actions carried out under their aegis. It is here, I suggest, that we see one of the clearest forms of a type of power that presupposes rather than annuls the capacities of agents.

Third, I suggest we need to attend to the assemblages within which the calculating self operates, and the territorialisations they seek to impose. For the calculative instruments of accountancy not only transform the possibilities for personhood. They also construct the calculable spaces that individuals inhabit within firms and other organizations. Whether it is an actual physical space such as a factory floor or a hospital ward, or an abstract space such as a “division”, a “cost centre” or a “profit centre”, or even an idea such as “failure”, the calculative instruments of accountancy territorialise, and in the process reframe the objects and objectives of governing. And they do so in such a way as to link highly specific domains such as healthcare or social care with larger political categories.

Fourth, a concern with the calculating self means that we need to understand better its ability to travel. While some ideas and practices travel “light”, others appear too heavy to travel easily. Put differently, the interdependence between the instruments for the governing of conduct, and the rationalities that articulate the aims and objectives of governing, seems at times to encounter limits regarding what can be done and where (Mennicken, 2008). Standard costing, for instance, was equally at home in the very different assemblages of the Soviet Union and the United States in the early decades of the twentieth century. Audit, likewise, seems today to travel effortlessly across a vast range of territories (Power, 1997). But other devices (for instance, something called accruals accounting) seem to travel less easily. This suggests that we still have much to find out about how the calculating self travels, and how this peculiarly modern form of personhood is fashioned and refashioned in historically specific assemblages.

References

Kurunmäki, L. and P. Miller (2006) “Modernising Government: The Calculating, Self, Hybridisation and Performance Measurement”, Financial Accountability and Management 22, pp. 87‐106.

Mennicken, A. (2008) “Connecting Worlds: The Translation of International Auditing Standards into Post‐Soviet Audit Practice”, Accounting, Organizations and Society 33, pp. 384‐414.

Miller, P. (1994) “Accounting and Objectivity: The Invention of Calculating Selves and Calculable Spaces”, in A. Megill (ed.), Rethinking Objectivity (Durham: Duke University Press).

Miller, P. (1998) “The Margins of Accounting”, in M. Callon (ed.), The Laws of the Markets (Basil Blackwell, 1998) pp. 174‐193.

Miller, P. and O’Leary, T. (1987) “Accounting and the Construction of the Governable Person”, Accounting, Organizations and Society, Vol. 12, No. 3 (1987) pp.235‐265.

Miller, P., L. Kurunmäki and T. O’Leary (2010) “Calculating Hybrids”, in V. Higgins and W. Larner (eds.), Calculating the Social: Standards and the Reconfiguration of Governing (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan).

Miller, P. and T. O’Leary (2007) “Mediating Instruments and Making Markets: Capital Budgeting, Science and the Economy”, Accounting, Organizations and Society 32, pp. 701‐734.

Miller, P. and Rose, N. (2008) Governing the Present: Administering Economic, Social and Personal Life (Cambridge: Polity Press).

Power, M. (1997) The Audit Society: Rituals of Verification, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Rose, N. and P. Miller (1992) “Political Power beyond the State: Problematics of Government”, British Journal of Sociology 43, pp. 173‐205.

Peter Miller

Peter Miller is Professor of Management Accounting at the London School of Economics and Political Science, Head of the Department of Accounting, and Deputy Director of the Centre for Analysis of Risk and Regulation. Prior to joining LSE, he was a Lecturer in Accounting at the University of Sheffield. He has been an Associate Editor of Accounting, Organizations and Society since 1988. He has published more than 50 articles in accounting and management journals such as Accounting, Organizations and Society, the European Accounting Review, the Journal of Accounting Research, Management Accounting Research, and the Academy of Management Review, as well as in a range of other social science journals such as Economy and Society, the British Journal of Sociology, Theory, Culture and Society, Theory and Society, Sociology, Cultural Values, and Social Research. He has also published four books, including Accounting as Social and Institutional Practice (co-edited with Anthony Hopwood, Cambridge University Press, 1994).

Accounting, Organizations and Institutions, with C.S.Chapman and D.J.Cooper (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009).

Governing the Present: Administering Economic, Social and Personal Life, P. Miller and N. Rose (Polity Press, 2008)

Accounting as Social and Institutional Practice, with A. Hopwood, 1994 (Cambridge University Press).

The Foucault Effect: Studies In Governmentality, G. Burchill, C. Gordon and P. Miller (eds.) (University of Chicago Press, 1991; Simon & Schuster, 1991).

Domination and Power (London: Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1987).

The Power of Psychiatry, P. Miller and N. Rose (eds.) (Basil Blackwell/Polity Press, 1986).

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Giovanna Procacci – Exploring security

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Giovanna ProcacciExploring security

Giovanna Procacci

Giovanna Procacci is Professor of Sociology at Milan University and past President of the European Sociology Association.

Selected publications

Gouverner la Misère. La question sociale en France 1789-1848. Paris: Editions du Seuil, 1993.

La scoperta della società. Alle origini della sociologia, with Arpad Szakolczai. Roma: Carocci Editore, 2003.

De la responsabilité solidaire. Mutations dans les politiques sociales d’aujourd’hui. (co-editor, co-author). Paris: Syllepse, 2003.

Conflicts, Citizenship and Civil Society. .(co-editor, co-author). London: Routledge, 2010.

“Governmentality and Citizenship”, in Blackwell Companion to Political Sociology, eds. A.Scott & K.Nash. Oxford: Blackwell, 2000, pp.340-351; republished in paperback, 2003.

“Governing Poverty: Sources of the Social Question in Nineteenth-Century France”, in Foucault andthe Writing of History, a cura di J.Goldstein. Oxford: Blackwell, 1994, pp.206-219.

“Social economy and the government of poverty”, .in The Foucault Effect. Studies in Governmentality (1991)

“Sociology and Its Poor” Politics & Society June 1989 17: 163-187

“The Thin Man: On Life and Love in Liberalism” (with Wolfgang Fach), 1987. Telos 76 (1988), pp.33-50

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Bernard Harcourt – The Punitive Order: Free Markets, Neoliberalism, and Mass Incarceration in the United States

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Bernard Harcourt - The Punitive Order: Free Markets, Neoliberalism, and Mass Incarceration in the United States

Much has been written about Michel Foucault’s critique of neoliberalism, both of neoliberalism in general and of the three different varieties of neoliberalism that he specifically discussed in his 1979 lectures (German Ordoliberalism, French Giscardian neoliberalism, and the Chicago School). In this essay, I explore Foucault’s critique of American neoliberalism specifically, and its relation to contem‐porary punitive practices in the United States.

Bernard Harcourt

http://www.law.uchicago.edu/faculty/harcourt

Recent lecture material online (French language):

Fabienne Brion, Bernard Harcourt: Le pouvoir de la vérité. Trois lectures de ‘Mal faire, dire vrai’, de Michel Foucault http://www.academieroyale.be/cgi?pag=1026&tab=146&rec=10279

Bernard is the Julius Kreeger Professor of Law, the Chair of the Political Science Department, and Professor of Political Science at The University of Chicago. Professor Harcourt’s scholarship intersects social and political theory, the sociology of punishment, and penal law and procedure. His latest book is The Illusion of Free Markets: Punishment and the Myth of Natural Order (Harvard University Press, forthcoming 2011) and the co-editor with Fabienne Brion of Michel Foucault’s Mal faire, dire vrai (forthcoming in French at Presses Universitaires de Louvain and in English at the University of Chicago Press). He is also the author of Against Prediction: Punishing and Policing in an Actuarial Age (University of Chicago Press 2007), Language of the Gun: Youth, Crime, and Public Policy (University of Chicago Press 2005), and Illusion of Order: The False Promise of Broken-Windows Policing (Harvard University Press 2001). Harcourt is the coauthor of Criminal Law and the Regulation of Vice (Thompson West 2007), the editor of Guns, Crime, and Punishment in America (New York University Press 2003), and the founder and editor of the journal Carceral Notebooks.

After law school, he clerked for the Hon. Charles S. Haight Jr. of the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of New York and then worked as an attorney at the Equal Justice Initiative in Montgomery, Alabama, representing death row inmates. He continues to represent death row inmates pro bono, and has also served on human rights missions in South Africa and Guatemala.

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Fabienne Brion – Governmentality, citizenship and dangerousness

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Fabienne BrionGovernmentality, citizenship and dangerousness

According to Ewald and Fontana, those who attended Foucault’s courses “were not only held in thrall by the narratives that unfolded week by week and seduced by the rigorous exposition; they also found a perspective on contemporary reality. (…) Foucault’s specific strength in his courses was the subtle interplay between learned erudition, personal commitment, and work on the event”. What perspective on the re‐codification of migrants and minorities along religious lines and on their criminalization can critical criminologists take from his work and to begin with, from the commentary on Oedipus the King that he offers in his Lectures on the Will to Know ? What is crime, if it is through the expulsion of the criminal – a gesture that is supposed to clean the city from the impurity that endangers it – that the formation of a social space given as the locus of monetary movement and right distribution is completed? Is dangerousness a function of citizenship, and citizenship a function of the formula of government? Is there something like criminalism that would be a layer of state racism? And if so, is this the layer that makes the forms of state racism change with the changes in citizenship?

Fabienne Brion

Professor of Criminology – Université Catholique de Louvain

Fabienne Brion is a professor of critical criminology at the Catholic University of Louvain. Her scholarship intersects philosophy, legal sociology and criminology. The author of several essays on the political uses of crime and criminology, she has repeatedly analysed how illegitimate discriminations are turned into legitimate distinctions, and taken criminalisation as a point of departure to examine what our political order is. She is the co-editor with Bernard Harcourt of Michel Foucault’s 1981 Louvain Lectures, Mal faire, dire vrai. Fonction de l’aveu en justice (forthcoming, Presses Universitaires de Louvain and University of Chicago Press), the editor of Féminité, minorité, islamité. Questions à propos du hijâb (2004), and the co-editor with Andrea Rea, Christine Schaut and Axel Tixhon of Mon délit ? Mon origine. Criminalité et criminalisation de l’immigration (2001).

Fabienne Brion, Bernard Harcourt:” Le pouvoir de la vérité. Trois lectures de ‘Mal faire, dire vrai’, de Michel Foucault” http://www.academieroyale.be/cgi?pag=1026&tab=146&rec=10279

Éthique et politique dans les sociétés libérales avancée, in J. Ch. Lemaire et P. Laclémence, Imaginer la sécurité globale, 2005, La Pensée et les Hommes, 48/57, p. 115-134

Contre la défense culturelle. De la discrimination positive à la décriminalisation, Bruxelles : Larcier, 2009

Des classes à la population ? Formules de gouvernement et détention, Chicago : Carceral.org, 2008, p. 23-44 http://www.thecarceral.org/

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Paul Patton – Governmentality and public reason: the critique of Neo-liberalism revisited

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Paul Patton - Governmentality and public reason: the critique of Neo-liberalism revisited

Readers often assume that the aim of Foucault’s 1978‐1979 lectures on neoliberalism was to provide a ‘critique’ of neoliberalism, where the nature of this critique is spelt out in the terms of one or other of his programmatic formulations: exit from the present, not to be governed in particular ways, etc. I want to suggest a way of reading those lectures that connects with a different kind of critique, namely one that provides a normative framework within which political power should be exercised. Foucault does not venture into this kind of normative territory, but such a reading is justified by his question: what would be the governmentality appropriate to socialism? (Foucault 2008: 94).

John Rawls’s egalitarian conception of political liberal public reason and its associated criterion of legitimate government offers a useful guide to how such a project might be pursued. His overtly normative approach to the question how should political power be exercised converges with Foucault’s descriptive approach to governmental reason. However, he presents the forms of public reason in which the exercise of power is discussed in relatively static and ahistorical terms. Foucault’s genealogical approach promises to show how public reason evolves in the broader context of the public political culture of liberal democracies. Conversely, Rawls’s preferred economic models of market socialism and property‐owning democracy point to possible ways to answer Foucault’s question above. The history of the idea of property‐owning democracy points to an egalitarian tendency within twentieth century liberal governmentality that a more comprehensive genealogy would need to consider.

Paul Patton

Paul Patton is Professor of Philosophy at the University of New South Wales

Books (selected)

(2000) Deleuze and the Political, Routledge.

(2000) Political Theory and the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Co-editor with Duncan Ivison and Will Sanders. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.

(2010) Deleuze and the Postcolonial. Co-editor with Simone Bignall. Edinburgh University Press.

(2010) Deleuzian Concepts: Philosophy, Colonization, Politics. Stanford University Press.

Recent book chapters

2010 ‘Multiculturalism and Political Ontology’ in Duncan Ivison ed The Ashgate Research Companion to Multiculturalism, Ashgate Publishing, 57-71.

2010 ‘Foucault and Normative Political Philosophy’ in Timothy O’Leary and Christopher Falzon eds Foucault and Philosophy, Wiley-Blackwell, 204-221.

2009 ‘Foucault’ in David Boucher and Paul Kelly eds Political Thinkers: From Socrates to the Present, Second Edition, Oxford University Press, 575-595.

2009 ‘Events, Becoming and History’ in J. A. Bell and C. Colebrook eds Deleuze and History, Edinburgh University Press, 33-53.

Recent articles

2011 ‘Life, Legitimation and Government,’ Constellations, 18:1, 35-45.

2009 ‘Rawls and the legitimacy of Australian Government,’ Australian Indigenous Law Review, 13:2, 59-69.

2007 ‘Derrida, Politics and Democracy to Come,’ Philosophy Compass, Volume 2, Issue 6, November, 766-780.

2007 ‘Deleuze and Derrida on the Concept and Future of Democracy,’ Distinktion: Scandinavian Journal of Social Theory, No. 15, October, 7-23.

2007 ‘Utopian Political Philosophy: Deleuze and Rawls,’ Deleuze Studies, 1:1, 41-59.

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Graham Burchell – Reflections on governmentalities and political culture (with Italy in mind)

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 4th, 2011

Event Date: 3 and 4 June 2011
Clore Lecture Theatre
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck College
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Centre for Law and the Humanities presents:

THE FOUCAULT EFFECT 1991-2011

A Conference at Birkbeck College, University of London Reflecting on 20 years of
The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality


Graham Burchell - Reflections on governmentalities and political culture (with Italy in mind)

Graham Burchell has to date translated seven volumes of Michel Foucault’s lectures, and writings by Deleuze and Guattari, Veyne, Donzelot and others. Co-editor and co-author, The Foucault Effect, Studies in Governmentality (1991)

Selected articles: “Peculiar Interests: Civil Society and Governing ‘The System of Natural Liberty’”, in The Foucault Effect: Studies in Governmentality (1991)

Liberal government and techniques of the self. IN Andrew Barry, Tom Osborne, Nikolas Rose (Eds.) Foucault and Political Reason: Liberalism, neo-liberalism and rationalities of government. London, University College London (1996)

‘Confession, resistance, subjectivity’, Journal for Cultural Research, 1740-1666, Volume 13, Issue 2, 2009, Pages 159 – 177

“Putting the child in its place”, I&C8: Diagrams of the Social, p 73-95 (1981)

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