Michael Dobson – Towards the next RSC ‘Taming of the Shrew’: a think-tank, with director Lucy Bailey

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 29th, 2011

 

 

 

 

Event date: 29 September 2011
 The Shakespeare Institute
Mason Croft, Church Street
Stratford-upon-Avon, CV37 6HP

 

Professor Michael Dobson (Director, Shakespeare Institute)
Towards the next RSC ‘Taming of the Shrew’: a think-tank, with director Lucy Bailey

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The Shakespeare Institute’s new Director, Professor Michael Dobson, and fellows Dr Tara Hamling, Dr Martin Wiggins and Professor John Jowett, discuss the RSC’s new production of ‘Taming of the Shrew’ with director Lucy Bailey, set designer Ruth Sutcliffe and actor David Cave (Petrucio).

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The Shakespeare Institute

An internationally renowned research institution established in 1951 to push the boundaries of knowledge about Shakespeare Studies and Renaissance Drama. The Shakespeare Institute offers a wide range of innovative postgraduate degrees, including postgraduate research.

During the Autumn and Spring terms, the Institute runs a series of Thursday seminars which are given by members of staff and invited speakers. The seminars start at 2.00pm lasting approximately 45 minutes followed by a question and answer session. University of Birmingham staff and students, and guests are welcome to attend.

 

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The Future of Biosecurity and Biosecuring the Future – conference page

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on September 22nd, 2011

 

 

Event date: 22 and 23 September 2011
Goodenough College
Mecklenburgh Square, London WC1N 2AB

The Socio-Politics of Biosecurity: Science, Policy and Practice

presents:

The Future of Biosecurity and Biosecuring the Future

Biosecurity Temporalities

Biosecurity is not only a spatial practice, it also operates through particular temporal registers.

Within biosecurity rationalities and discourses, the future is brought into the realm of contemporary political calculation through risk management approaches, as the unpredictability of life is used to justify actions made in the present to attempt to control, or produce, the future.

Biosecurity approaches also respond to or produce particular future-orientated ‘affect’. This entails, on the one hand, the anxiety, fear and worry of farmers who wait for the next pest or disease to arrive on their farms, and on the other, the excitement and passion of community groups involved in native restoration projects.

Biosecurity Futures

But what is the future for biosecurity, and what will future biosecurity practices and approaches entail?

Will climate change demand a new paradigm of ecological management through the growing disparity between ‘native’ species and suitable national ecological conditions?

Will we learn to live with and value ecological change?

Or will climate change be used to justify greater biosecurity control, as pest species and diseases ever expand their ecological ranges?

To begin to respond to these questions, this seminar event will bring speakers, discussion panels, exhibition and film into a public forum for a wider debate about the future of biosecurity.

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Programme:
Thursday 22 September 2011

Welcome by Dr Kezia Barker .

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History of the Seminar Series and Introductions

PLAY

 

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Professor Jeff Waage (Director of London International Development Centre)
Future bioinvasions – viewing future risk from different sectors and cultures
(AUDIO HERE)

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Niall Moore (Head of Non-Native Species Secretariat)
(AUDIO HERE)

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Dr Kezia Barker (Birkbeck, University of London)
Surveilling and Preventing Possible Biosecurity Futures
(AUDIO HERE)

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Keynote Presentation: Professor Daniel Simberloff  (University of Tennessee-Knoxville)
Non-Native Species Risk: When, Where and to Whose Interests?
(AUDIO HERE)

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Friday 23 September 2011

Dr Simon Goodman (University of Leeds)
(AUDIO HERE)

Rose Cairns (University of Leeds)
Social barriers to the generation and implementation of appropriate biosecurity policies in Galápagos
(AUDIO HERE)

Godfrey Merlin (Freelance researcher and activist, Galápagos)
Red Riding Hood and the Big Bad Wolf
(AUDIO HERE)

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Populist Racism In Britain and Europe since 1945 – conference page

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on September 22nd, 2011

 

Event Date: 22 and 23 September 2011
Sunley Management Centre

Park Campus,
University of Northampton

Radicalism and New Media Group presents:

 Populist Racism In Britain and Europe since 1945

 

KEYNOTING:

  • Professor Aristotle Kallis,
  • Dr Hans-Georg Betz

Additional analysis:

  • Professor Nigel Copsey,
  • Dr Gavin Schaffer,
  • Dr Jane Callaghan,
  • The Think Project,
  • Searchlight
  • and  others

 

Following in tradition established by the Radical-ism and New Media research group, this two-day conference will bring together scholars, practitioners and third sector professionals either working on innovative research, or front line engagement with, the causes, nature and effect of populist racism in Britain and Europe.

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MAJOR THEMES COVERED:

 Topics to be discussed by practitioners and academics will include:

  • The relationship between populist racism and violent extremism;
  • The latest developments with the BNP, EDL and European far-right movements;
  • Analysis of how the mass media represents populist racism;
  • State responses to forms of populist racism;
  • Factors that create ‘fertile conditions’ for popu-list racism to develop;
  • The role of the new media.

 

ENCOURAGING NEW APPROACHES

As well as talks from experts, up-and-coming researchers, and professional perspectives, there will be networking opportunities for informal engagement with these themes, to encourage new approaches to tackling populist racism.

 Programme:

22 September 2011

Welcome and Opening Keynote:

Hans-Georg Betz, ‘Populism, Nativism and Contemporary Radical Right-Wing Ideology’
Due to technical failure we cannot provide you with the audio recording of this talk. However, we will attempt to bring you this sometiome in the near future.

Parallel panels I:

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Panel 1a: Northern Europe

Daunis Auers, ‘Mapping Populist Racism in the Baltic States’
[AUDIO HERE]

Simon Oja, ‘From Skinheads and Shouting to Suits and Debating’
[AUDIO HERE]

Kristina Boreus, ‘Right-Wing Populism and Discursive Discrimination in Austria, Denmark and Sweden’
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel 1a discussion .

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Panel 1b: Populist Racism and Lone Wolf Terrorism in Europe

Matthew Feldman, ‘Comparative Lone Wolf Terrorism’
[AUDIO HERE]

Paul Jackson, ‘Lone Wolf Terrorism and Right-Wing Extremism’
Rafael Pantucci, ‘How Xenophobic Are Lone Wolf Islamists?’

Due to technical failure we cannot provide you with the audio recording of these talks. However, we will attempt to bring you this sometiome in the near future.

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Parallel Panels II

Panel 2a: Eastern Europe

Alina Polyakova, ‘Civil Society and Right-Wing Politics: Explaining the Rightís Success and Failure in Central Eastern Europe’
[AUDIO HERE]

Parikrama Gupta, ‘Racism in Russia: Not a Problem for the Russian State’
[AUDIO HERE]

Andreas Umland, ‘Zhirinovskii as a Fascist: Palingenetic Ultra-Nationalism in Documents of the Liberal-Democratic Party of Russia in the early 1990s’
[AUDIO HERE]

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Panel 2b: Populist Racism against Roma and Sinti travellers

Zbigniew Wojcik and Lukasz Gazda, ‘Roma: NOT Hard to Reach Community’
[AUDIO HERE]

John Coxhead, ‘Roma: Deconstructing Populist Xenophobia’
[AUDIO HERE]

Gabriela Augustynowicz-Casey, ‘The Roma: The Need of a New Language of Social Communication
[AUDIO HERE]

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Parallel Panels III

Panel 3a: Western Europe

Brigitte Beauzamy, ‘The Role of the Radical Right in the Politicization of Anti-Semitism and Islamophobia’
[AUDIO HERE]
Aurelien Mondon, ‘Nicolas Sarkozyís Legitimisation of the Front National’
[AUDIO HERE]

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Panel 3b: The Psychological Dimension of Populist Racism

Jane Callaghan, ‘There’s Something Happening Here: Visual Images of the EDL and BNP’
[AUDIO HERE]

Paul Crofts, “Us” and “Them” in Defining the “Other”. A Case Study on Framing Muslims and Islamaphobia and Racism from Kettering’
[AUDIO HERE]

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Panel 4 ‘Representing ‘Otherness’

Darya Malyutina, ‘From Racism to Cosmopolitan Sociability: Perceptions of ëOthersí in the Conditions of Superdiversity by Russian-speaking Migrants in London’
[AUDIO HERE]

Trev Preston, ‘Boots, Braces and Blogs: Representations of Right-Wing Extremism in Britain’
[AUDIO HERE]

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23 September 2011

Opening Welcome

Prof. Nick Petford, Vice-Chancellor, University of Northampton .

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Keynote

Aristotle Kallis, ‘The “Contagion” Dynamic of the Far-Right’
[AUDIO HERE]

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Launch of RNM Groupís report on the English Defence League

Dr Paul Jackson and Dr Mark Pitchford .

(download PDF)

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Panel 1 by Practitioners

The Think Project: Geraint Whittaker, Laura Lake and Rocio Cifuentes
talk:

PLAY

 

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questions:

PLAY

 

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Panel 2 by Practitioners

Searchlight: ‘The Post War Impact of Julius Evola on British Politics and Beyond’

Alfio Bernabei, ‘The Mind of Julius Evola: Between Fascism and Mysticism’
[AUDIO HERE]

Gerry Gable, ‘The Devil’s Disciples: From Fiore to Griffin’
[AUDIO HERE]

Sonia Gable, ‘Are Griffin’s Appeals for Race and Civil War Helping Britain’s Far Right?’
[AUDIO HERE]

Searchlight Panel discussion .

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Book (and Series) Launch

Far-right.com, first in “Mapping the Far Right” series, eds. Paul Jackson and Gerry Gable
book available HERE:
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Academic Panel

Gavin Schaffer, ‘The Vision of a Nation: Making Multiculturalism on British Television 1960-1980′
[AUDIO HERE]

Nigel Copsey, ‘Au Revoir to “Sacred Cows”? The Nouvelle Droite’s Impact on Britain’s Far Right’
[AUDIO HERE]

Anton Shekhovtsov, ‘Far-Right Music in Britain’
[AUDIO HERE]

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Final Panel discussion .

Concluding Round table discussion

PLAY

 

download

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selected photos from the conference:

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Contesting Shi‘ism: Isna ‘Ashari and Isma‘ili Shi‘ism in modern South Asia

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on September 9th, 2011

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 9-10 September  2011
Royal Holloway, University of London

 

 

Contesting Shi‘ism: Isna ‘Ashari and Isma‘ili Shi‘ism in modern South Asia

 

Shi‘a Muslims constitute a significant, though indeterminate (perhaps c. 15-20%) minority within South Asian Islam, making South Asia one of the world’s most

significant centres of Shi‘a population. Moreover, the historical associations of Shi‘ism in many parts of South Asia with historic ruling dynasties and/or wider Indo-Persian cultural traditions mean that Shi‘ism has had social, cultural, political and intellectual influences in South Asia out of all proportion to the enumeration of the religion’s formal adherents. Nevertheless, for too long scholarly attention has tended to focus on Shi‘ism in states such as Iran or Iraq, casting South Asia to the peripheries of the Shi‘a world.

This conference aims to address this gap in our understanding by focusing on various aspects of Shi‘a Islam in modern South Asia, from the late-nineteenth century to the present. It will

illustrate the relevance of Shi‘a Islam to understanding South Asian Islam’s engagements

with modernity, reform, rationality and notions of the individual self. In doing so, it will contribute to current academic debates on the diversity and dynamism of religious traditions within South Asian Islam, while adding considerably to our understanding of Shi‘ism as a world religion, with significant and autonomous manifestations in various global regions, rather than one primarily directed from perceived ‘heartlands’ in cities such as Najaf or Qom.

The panellists, to be drawn from diverse academic disciplines, will analyze in various ways the dynamics of religious, social and political change in Shi‘a societies in modern South Asia, and their contributions to debates on identity formation within Islam. Speakers are invited to consider ideas of Shi‘a influence on or interaction with Indo-Islamic cultures and societies more widely, or to assess contestations within or between Shi‘a communities themselves.

For the colonial period, for instance, participants are invited to consider the responses of the Shi‘a to the encounter with colonial rule. One may consider, for instance, the various aspects of religious change occurring in the period, such as the expansion of Shi‘a madrasa education, growth of a culture of theological polemics and the historical trajectories of particular Shi‘a ritual and cultural practices, for instance matam (self-flagellation), and majlis-i-‘aza (sermon-gatherings for the remembrance of the Imams). Others may consider social change among the Shi‘a ashraf (nobility) or development of new Shi‘a communitarian identities, each of which were in some sense facilitated by encounters with the new technologies and knowledge systems embedded in the experience of colonialism.

Post-independence, papers may additionally focus on the strategic adjustments of Shi‘a clerics and secular elites to ensuring the preservation of their religious rights (and rites) in the overwhelmingly Sunni state of Pakistan and ‘Hindu’ India. Shi‘a concerns and political campaigns, regarding such issues as permissions to take out ta‘ziya processions during Muharram, the applicability of fiqh-i-Ja‘fariya as a separate code of Shi‘a personal laws, and a separate curriculum for religious studies in public schools, are all themes that can be considered as a basis for the understanding of Shi‘a responses to state management of religion or, in some cases, the perceived Islamization of the state.

A particular aim of the conference will be to combine analyses of the Isna ‘Ashari Shi‘a and those of the Isma‘ili Shi‘a. These two communities, each influential in their own right in parts of the subcontinent, have always been discussed in isolation from each other in scholarship; this conference thus opens the possibilities for a meaningful comparison of their experiences as religious confessions and minority communities. Equally, the conference welcomes reflection on the relationships of the South Asian Shi‘a with those in the wider world: for instance, ideas of clerical internationalism tying the Isna ‘Ashari Shi‘a of north India, Hyderabad or Karachi to Iraq or Iran, or the links between the Isma‘ili Shi‘a of South Asia and their co-religionists in East Africa and elsewhere.

With themes of the ‘Iranianization’ of global Shi‘ism and the growth of Shi‘a-Sunni sectarianism at the forefront of contemporary academic and media discussion, this conference will allow the opportunity for meaningful analysis of transitions and contestations internal to Shi‘a communities. It will permit a greater recognition of the historical influence of Shi‘ism within South Asian Islamic cultures and societies more broadly, and will evoke a vision of modern South Asian Shi‘ism as existing at the centre, rather than the margins, of the wider Shi‘a world.

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FRIDAY 9TH SEPTEMBER

 

Introduction by Justin Jones .

 

Keynote Address: 

Francis Robinson
Reflections on the Shi‘a in South Asia and the wider Muslim World.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Session I

Michel Boivin
The Isna ‘Ashari-Isma‘ili divide among the Khojas around 1910: exploring forgotten judicial sources from Karachi.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Ian Williams
Shared and disputed symbols within Twelver Shi‘ite and Ahl-i-Sunnat traditions of Islam: an examination of theological constructions and devotional practices among leaders and adherents from nineteenth century South Asia to the contemporary U.K.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Tahir Kamran
Sufi shrines, electoral politics and sectarian violence in Punjab: a case study of the dargah of Siyal Sharif.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Session II

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Ludovic Gandelot
Isma‘ili Aga Khani religious and social identities, as seen through Sultan Muhammad Shah’s firmans at the beginning of the twentieth century.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Soumen Mukherjee
Of ‘religious and social welfare’ and ‘progress of the community’: religious inspiration, leadership and idioms of welfarism among Shi‘a Imami Isma‘ilis in twentieth century South Asia and East Africa.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Bashir Damji
The Khoja Isna ‘Ashari communities of East Africa: from newcomers to flag-bearers.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Session III

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Sajjad Rizvi
Establishing the principles of the faith for a new Shi‘ite polity: the theology of Sayyid Dildar ‘Ali Nasirabadi.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Justin Jones
Khandan-i-Ijtihad: authority and transition in a family of Shi‘a ‘ulama in Lucknow, c.1850-1950.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Ali Khan
Local nodes of a trans-national network: a case study of a Shi‘a family in Awadh, 1900-1950.
AUDIO NOT AVAILABLE

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Session IV

 

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Simon Wolfgang Fuchs
Third-wave Shi‘ism: Sayyid Arif Husayn al-Husayni and the Islamic revolution in Pakistan.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Hasan Ali Khan
The role of the Auqaf Department in redefining Sufi and Shi‘a built heritage in Pakistan.
[AUDIO HERE]

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Saleem Khan
The Shi‘a dominance of the legal profession in British India: a study of the lawyerpoliticians of Bihar.
[AUDIO HERE]

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images from the conference:

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