Juliane Rebentisch – Return to Sender: Why Democrats Should Not Accept Rousseau’s Letter on the Theatre

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 15th, 2011
Event Date: 15 December 2011
SPACE,
129-131 Mare Street, Hackney,
London E8 3RH

Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP)

presents:

Professor Juliane Rebentisch (Philosophy, University of Frankfurt)
Return to Sender: Why Democrats Should Not Accept Rousseau’s Letter on the Theatre

————————————————–

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne .

————————————————–

talk:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————–

questions:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————–

No Comments

Celebrating Rozsika Parker 1945 – 2010

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 10th, 2011

__

Event Date: 10 December 2011
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck College
London WC1

CELEBRATING ROZSIKA PARKER 1945 – 2010
A DAY SYMPOSIUM ON ART, FEMINISM
AND PSYCHOANALYSIS

Convened by
Griselda Pollock, Lisa Baraitser, Anthea Callen, Briony Fer & Sigal Spigel

The Symposium will explore the many facets of Rozsika Parker’s unique and influential contribution to feminist interventions in art criticism and history, psychotherapy, psychoanalytical theories of maternal ambivalence and body dysmorphia.
Speakers include:

Lisa Baraitser, Pennina Barnett, Anthea Callen, Briony Fer, Jennifer Harris, Joanne Heath, Alessandra Lemma, Lesley Murdin, Claire Pajaczkowsa, Griselda Pollock, Joan Raphael-Leff, Joanna Ryan, Lynne Segal, Sigal Spigel, Julia Vellacott.

Programme:

Introduction by Griselda Pollock .
——————————————————————————–
Panel I: Art Writing & History
Griselda Pollock

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Anthea Callen

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Briony Fer

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Panel 1 Questions

PLAY

 

download


——————————————————————————–
Panel 2 Femininity & Cloth
Pennina Barnett
[AUDIO HERE]

——————-
Claire Pajaczkowska: Schmutter – A Letter to Rosie
[AUDIO HERE]

——————-
Panel 2 Questions

PLAY

 

download


——————————————————————————–
Panel 3 Between Art & Psychoanalysis
Introduction to Panel 3 by Griselda Pollock .
Joanne Heath

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Griselda Pollock

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Panel 3 Questions

PLAY

 

download


——————————————————————————–
Panel 4 Body Dysmorphia
Alessandra Lemma

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Joanna Ryan

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Panel 4 Questions

PLAY

 

download


——————————————————————————–
Panel 5 Maternal Studies
Lynne Segal

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Lisa Baraitser

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Joan Raphael-Leff

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Panel 5 Questions

PLAY

 

download


———————————————————————————————–

Rozsika Parker in Action:

Julia Vellacott

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Rose Ades

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Kate Constable

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Julia Vellacot

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Sarah Jones

PLAY

 

download

——————-
Sally Dean

PLAY

 

download

——————-

Closing Comments and Questions .

No Comments

Age Spots and Spotlights: Celebrity, Ageing and Performance

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 9th, 2011

Event Date 9 December 2011 2011 Birkbeck College Clore Management Centre Torrington Place London WC1E

Age Spots and Spotlights: Celebrity, Ageing and Performance

Diane Keaton has just published her memoirs. Reflecting on becoming a mother at 50 and kissing Jack Nicholson at 57, Keaton is ageing in her own unique way. On Friday 9 December Birkbeck, University of London, is holding a major research symposium exploring how stars including Keaton, Brigitte Bardot, Nicole Kidman and Elizabeth Taylor aged in the public eye.

This one-day research symposium, organised by Dr Janet McCabe and Dr Deborah Jermyn, will debate two significant (and interlinked) issues; performance and ageing. Encompassing both historical and topical case studies, speakers will consider a range of celebrities, stars and case studies drawn from different national and industrial contexts. The keynote speaker will be Professor Ginette Vincendeau (King’s College, University of London).
The co-organisers believe the time is right for new scholarship focussing on ageing and celebrity and for us to think anew about how we think about growing old. We hear endless reports of how age is becoming increasingly relative, ‘60 is the new 40’ and so on’. With the baby boomer generation going into retirement and being reluctant to be written off as ‘old’, there is a heightened demand for positive representations of ageing. At the same time, stars like Helen Mirren are re-writing the rules for older women working in Hollywood, says Jermyn. The symposium addresses some of these issues and asks just how much things are really changing, since women stars are still subjected to a much more critical eye as they age than are their male co-stars. ‘Growing old, and I do mean growing’ writes Diane Keaton, ‘requires reinvention’. I like this quote, says McCabe. We must adjust our ideas about how we age without talking exclusively about how we defy the ageing process. This symposium adopts different perspectives and thinks anew about how celebrity is changing our perceptions and attitudes toward ageing and getting older. ————————————————-

Programme
Introduction and Welcome by Janet McCabe and Deborah Jermyn .
—————————————————————————–
Panel 1

Dr. Tim MarkhamAgeing disgracefully
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–

Dr. Mike Allen and Dr. Janet McCabeImitations of Lives
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Prof. Mary WoodAuteur or Celebrity?
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Panel 1 Questions

PLAY

 

download

——————————————————————————–
Panel 2

Dr. Susan SmithGet Off Your Asses For These Old Broads!
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Dr. Deborah JermynGlorious, Glamorous and that Old Standby, Amorous:
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Dr. Kirsty FaircloughNothing Less Than Perfect
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Prof. Pam CookNicole Kidman: Back to Nature
[AUDIO HERE]

—————————————–
Panel 2 Questions

PLAY

 

download

——————————————————————————–
Keynote:

Prof. Ginette VincendeauAgeing Disgracefully: Brigitte Bardot at 75
[AUDIO HERE]

No Comments

Julia Reinhard Lupton – The Renaissance Republic of Furniture: From Political Theology to Political Ecology

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 8th, 2011

 

Event Date: 8 December 2011
Swedenborg Hall
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH

THE LONDON GRADUATE SCHOOL
Presents

Julia Reinhard LuptonThe Renaissance Republic of Furniture: From Political Theology to Political Ecology

Julia Reinhard Lupton is Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of California, Irvine, with a joint appointment in Education. In 2010-2011, she is directing UCI’s Program in Jewish Studies. In 2007, she was named a Chancellor’s Fellow at the University of California, Irvine, in recognition of her contributions to Shakespeare studies. She is currently Visiting Distinguished Professor of English Literature at Kingston University London.

Her latest book, Thinking with Shakespeare: Essays on Politics and Life, was published by the University of Chicago Press in Spring 2011. Citizen-Saints: Shakespeare and Political Theology, was published by the University of Chicago Press in 2005. Lupton is also author of Afterlives of the Saints: Hagiography, Typology and Renaissance Literature (Stanford, 1996) and co-author with Kenneth Reinhard of After Oedipus: Shakespeare in Psychoanalysis (Cornell, 1992).

Political Theology and Early Modernity co-edited with Graham Hammill is forthcoming from University of Chicago Press in 2012, with essays by Victoria Kahn, Drew Daniel, Paul Kottman, Jennifer Rust, Kathleen Biddick, and others (plus an afterword by Etienne Balibar).

————————————————————

Introduction .

————————————————————

talk:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————

questions:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————

accompanying images:

————————————————————

1 Comment

François Laruelle – Pourquoi une éthique à l’usage des philosophes?

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 7th, 2011

Event Date: 7 December 2011
Swedenborg Hall
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH

THE LONDON GRADUATE SCHOOL

Presents

LARUELLE in LONDON: The LGS Seminars

Professor François LaruellePourquoi une éthique à l’usage des philosophes?

(Why do philosopher need to use ethics?)

 

NB: The lecture is in French. A downloadable English translation can be found here. Most of the time Professor Laruelle’s talk coincides with the written text, but on occasion he extemporises, which is when simultaneous translation is offered by Dr Marjorie Gracieuse. This is also the case for the Q&A.

Text translation by Nicola Rubcazk, Dr Anthony Paul Smith, and Dr Marjorie Gracieuse

Starting this winter, Professor François Laruelle will give two annual seminars and workshops on Non-Standard Philosophy at the London Graduate School. The first of these events will be on December 6th and 7th 2011, and the second will take place in May 2012.
Professor Laruelle has taught at both the University of Paris X, and the Collège international de philosophie, and is the author of over twenty books, including Les philosophies de la différence (1986), Principes de la non-philosophie (1996), Le Christ futur (2002), and, most recently, Le Concept de non-photographie and Anti-Badiou (both 2011) – all of which have either just appeared or will soon appear in English translation.
Over this forty year period, Laruelle has constructed one of the most demanding, methodical, and provocative intellectual practices in contemporary theory – an absolutely immanent materialism of thought. The purpose of these series of talks at the LGS will be both to cover the conceptual background to Non-Standard Philosophy and to explore its consequences for theory throughout the arts, sciences, and humanities.

——————————————————

talk:

PLAY

 

download

——————————————————

questions:

PLAY

 

download

——————————————————

4 Comments

Geoffrey Alderman – Defending the Indefensible: Reflections on the Anglo-Jewish Reaction to Domestic Antisemitism, 1931 – 1940

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 6th, 2011

Event Date: 6 Dec 2011
The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square,
London WC1B 5DP

Making History: Archives, Artefacts and Interpreting the Past
lecture series in partnership with the Wiener Library

 

Professor Geoffrey Alderman (University of Buckingham):
Defending the Indefensible: Reflections on the Anglo-Jewish Reaction to Domestic Antisemitism, 1931 – 1940

During the 1930s Britain’s Jewish leadership felt itself compelled to formulate and implement a coherent, communities-wide “defence” policy. This was something that had never before been attempted. What the leadership was defending was a benign communal image, grounded in the belief that Jewish emancipation in Britain had been an unqualified success. But the reality was very different. Many communal leaders found themselves as concerned with social control as with confronting the fascist menace.

Using a variety of archival sources, including those originating from within fascist circles, Professor Alderman will trace the evolution of this idiosyncratic defence policy and attempt to judge its validity.

————————————————————————————-

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism
“The relationship between antisemitism and other forms of racism and exclusion is not only a historical question. It is an urgent issue for today.” Professor David Feldman, Director.
The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism was established by the Pears Foundation and is based at Birkbeck, University of London. It is a centre of innovative research and teaching, contributing to discussion and policy formation on antisemitism as well as other forms of racial prejudice and intolerance. It is both independent and inclusive.

————————————————————————

Introduction by David Feldman .

————————————————————————

talk:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————————

questions:

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————————

No Comments

Wallich and Indian Natural History: Collection Dispersal and the Cultivation of Knowledge

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on December 6th, 2011

__________ __________



Event Date: 6 December 2011
Flett Lecture Theatre
Natural History Museum
London SW7 5BD

 

Wallich and Indian Natural History:
Collection Dispersal and the Cultivation of Knowledge

 

This international, interdisciplinary conference will be held on the 6th and 7th December, 2011 at the Natural History Museum, London and the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew on the general theme of South Asian natural history collections, with a special emphasis on those of the Danish botanist Nathaniel Wallich (1786–1854). Wallich is a major figure in the history and development of botany in the nineteenth century. As Superintendent of the Calcutta Botanic Garden between 1817 and 1846, he undertook botanical expeditions, described new plant species, collected thousands of plant specimens amassing a large herbarium, and commissioned local artists to draw beautiful botanical watercolours. His work has therefore been extremely influential in South Asian natural history research.

Major South Asian natural history collections from the 18th and 19th century are now dispersed across institutions in South Asia, Europe and beyond. This conference will explore the challenges associated with studying and exploiting such collections and the interesting opportunities they provide for interdisciplinary research. It forms an integral part of the World Collections Programme-funded project “Wallich and Indian Natural History”, the first inter-institutional endeavour of its kind between the Natural History Museum, the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, and the British Library. In particular, this project is creating an exciting new website (coming soon) which supports a virtual collection of the plant drawings, specimens and correspondence of Nathaniel Wallich.

In celebration of this project, a group of distinguished international speakers has been brought together to present papers covering a wide range of different disciplines. They will speak on the first day of the conference at the Natural History Museum. Day two, held at the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, will provide a unique opportunity to see a wide range of Wallich and related materials (including original drawings and herbarium collections) behind the scenes at Kew. We welcome everyone interested in natural history, art history, botany, South Asian studies, social history, history of the British Empire, museum studies and digital humanities to join us for what we anticipate will be a very stimulating conference.

—————————————————–

Programme

Welcome by Professor Philip Rainbow (Keeper of Zoology, NHM) .

—————————————————–
Opening Remarks (Julie Harvey, CAHR Centre)

PLAY

 

download

—————————————————–

Panel 1 - Nathaniel Wallich: His Expeditions and Collections

(Chair: Dr B. Venugopal, Director, National Museum of Natural History, New Delhi)

David Arnold (Department of History, University of Warwick)
Nathaniel Wallich and the Natural History of India
[AUDIO HERE]

Bodhisattva Kar (Centre for Studies in Social Sciences, Calcutta, and the International Institute of Social History, Amsterdam)
Frontier, Collected: Nathaniel Wallich in the North-Eastern Frontier of British India
[AUDIO HERE]

Sangeeta Rajbhandary (Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University), and
Krishna K. Shrestha (Central Department of Botany, Tribhuvan University), Mark F. Watson (Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh)
Wallich and the First Explorations of the Nepalese Flora
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel 1 Discussion

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————————————–

Panel 2 – Dispersal and Movement within the British Empire

(Chair: Professor Felix Driver, Professor of Human Geography, Royal Holloway College, University of London)

Sandip Hazareesingh (Department of History, The Open University)
Plants, Power and Productivity: The East India Company and Cotton Imperialism in Early Nineteenth-Century Western India
[AUDIO HERE]

Caroline Cornish (Department of Geography, Royal Holloway College, University of London)
Circulating India: Kew, Colonial Forestry and Circuits of Display
[AUDIO HERE]

Kapil Raj (École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales, Paris)
Title TBC
[AUDIO HERE]

Panel 2 Discussion

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————————————–

Panel 3. The Wallich Project
(Chair: Dr Vinita Damodaran, Senior Lecturer in South Asian History, University of Sussex)

Henry Noltie (Royal Botanic Garden, Edinburgh)
Scottish Surgeons and Indian Botany: Dispersed Collections of Drawings and Specimens, a Case Study from the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
[AUDIO HERE]

Antonia Moon (British Library) and Charlie Jarvis (Natural History Museum)
Wallich’s Papers at the British Library and Beyond
[AUDIO HERE]

Timothy Utteridge (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew), Clare Drinkell (Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew) and Ranee Prakash (Natural History Museum) The Wallich Plant Illustrations in London: Identification and Dissemination
[AUDIO HERE]
Panel 3 Discussion

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————————————–

Closing Remarks (Julie Harvey, CAHR Centre) .

———————————————————————————————–

conference images:

2 Comments

Daniel Rothschild – Expressing Credences

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 5th, 2011

Event Date: 5 December 2011
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

 

Daniel Rothschild (Oxford)  – Expressing Credences

After presenting a simple expressivist account of reports of probabilistic judgments, I explore a classic problem for it, namely the Frege-Geach problem. I argue that is a problem not just for expressivism, but for any reasonable account of ascriptions of graded judgments. I suggest that the problem can be resolved by appropriately modelling imprecise credences.

Daniel Rothschild is a Post-doctoral Research Fellow at All Souls College, Oxford. Prior to that he was an Assistant Professor of Philosophy at Columbia University. He holds a PhD in Philosophy from Princeton University. His research focuses on natural language semantics and pragmatics. He has written on specific constructions such as conditionals, descriptions, questions, and modals, as well as foundational topics such as presupposition, expressivism, game-theoretic pragmatics, and dynamic semantics.

—————————————————-

talk:

PLAY

 

download

—————————————————-

No Comments

Newcastle Animal Ethics and Sustainable Food Policy Conference: A Minding Animals International Pre-Conference

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on December 2nd, 2011

Event Date: 2 December 2011; 09.00-17.00
Newcastle University,
Baddiley-Clark Building,
Newcastle-upon-Tyne,
NE1 7RU

Newcastle Animal Ethics and Sustainable Food Policy Conference:
A Minding Animals International Pre-Conference
Objectives of the conference
This conference will provide an opportunity to bring together the best scholars working on the intersections between animal ethics, sustainability, and food policy, and to develop further capacity and stimulate community action in this field. Scholars from different disciplines as well as those who adopt interdisciplinary perspectives are welcomed to submit extended abstracts insofar as they engage with the question of how governments should address the ethical issues raised by the consumption of animal products. To contextualise the problem, abstracts should address the following question: ‘How should the UK Government regulate the consumption of animal products?’
Context
This conference is needed to build capacity as well as consolidate existing scholarship and community action on the ethics and politics associated with the consumption of animal products. Internationally, the field of human-animal studies has gained impetus through the ‘Minding Animals’ conferences, the first of which was held at the University of Newcastle, Australia, in 2009, and the second of which will be held in 2012. The planned conference will serve as a pre-conference for the latter, which will provide a further opportunity to explore the theme of animal ethics and sustainable food policy. The Newcastle Animal Ethics and Sustainable Food Policy conference will provide an opportunity to address the question of how governments should regulate the consumption of animal products. Whereas speakers are invited to focus on the UK with its distinctive social, economic, geographical, and climatological context, they should also consider how UK policies might differ from as well as inspire policies that might be adopted in other legal contexts.
——————————————————

Programme:

Introduction to the day by
Cristina Fernandez-Garcia (Newcastle University) .

————————————————

Steven McCulloch (The Royal Veterinary College)
Agriculture, animal welfare and climate change: an analysis of sustainable intensification and radical naturalism as responses to the impending perfect storm
[AUDIO HERE]

————————————————

Tanya Wyatt (Northumbria University)
An exploration of animal abuse in the increased scale and industrialisation of pig farming
[AUDIO HERE]

————————————————

Maureen Robertson and Keith Robertson (The Scottish School of Herbal Medicine)
Given the strong causal link between the consumption of animal products and ill health, how can the UK government use its health and farming policies to reduce the intake of animal products?
[AUDIO HERE]

————————————————

Tony Milligan (University of Aberdeen)
A case for legislation against wild meat
[AUDIO HERE]

————————————————

Jan Deckers (Newcastle University)
A reflection on the day and an introduction to the UK vegan project

[AUDIO HERE]

————————————————

Final Comments and Close .

No Comments

From Fascism to the “Years of Lead”: Italian Responses to Trauma

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 2nd, 2011

Event Date 2 December 2011
Royal Holloway University of London
Bedford Square
2 Gower Street
London WC1E 6DP

 

TRAUMA, FICTION, HISTORY seminar series

School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures

From Fascism to the “Years of Lead”: Italian Responses to Trauma

Introduction by Professor Colin Davies .
————————-
Dr Ruth Glynn, Senior Lecturer in Italian, University of Bristol
‘Trauma and the Leaden Years’

The legacy of Italy’s widespread and prolonged experience of political violence in the period known as the ‘anni di piombo’ (years of lead, c. 1969-83) has begun to be interrogated through the prism of trauma theory. This paper sets out the case for pursuing such a reading of the anni di piombo as cultural and collective trauma paying close attention to issues of repression and hypervigilance in Italian cultural and legal responses to those years. It then turns to address, more specifically, the traumatic import of women’s participation in the political violence of the anni di piombo, with reference to critical perspectives on the roles traditionally assigned women in discourses relating to culture and nation.
talk:

PLAY

 

download

——————————————–
Dr Giuliana Pieri, Senior Lecturer in Italian, RHUL
‘Trauma and Memory after Fascism: Italian Art and Fascist Violence’

This paper will focus on Italian art in the period 1938-46 ca. As Italian Fascism entered its final phase, Italian artists began to show a  new violent imagery in their works. This paper will focus on war art and its contemporary and postwar reception as a means to interrogate the difficult and still debated legacy of Italian Fascism in Italy. I began to reflect upon the possible links between trauma theory and the reception of Fascism in postwar Italian culture when I curated the exhibition Against Mussolini: Art and the Fall of a Dictator (London: Estorick, 2010). Some of the images which will be the focus of my talk can be found in the exhibition website: http://mussolinicult.com
talk:

PLAY

 

download

——————————————–
questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments