Christopher Perriam – Screen Images of Queer Spanish Poets

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 30th, 2012

Event Date: Tuesday 30 October 2012
in Main Lecture Theatre (MLT), Founder’s Building,
Royal Holloway, University of London

 

 The 2012 David Vilaseca Memorial Lecture

Professor Christopher PerriamScreen Images of Queer Spanish Poets

The lecture considers two biopics and two web-based TV mini-documentaries on Spanish poets: El consul de Sodoma/ The Consul of Sodom directed by Sigfrid Monleón (2010) on Jaime Gil de Biedma and Little Ashes directed by Paul Morrison (2008) on Federico García Lorca (and Salvador Dalí and Luis Buñuel); and two web-based TV mini-documentaries on Vicente Aleixandre and Luis Cernuda.  In all these cases, different forms of reproduction of poetic writing clash and intertwine with queer subtexts, creating tellingly incongruous effects both of vagueness and erasure and of excess and amplification. In particular, the lecture considers the distortions that can arise when intense and allusive,sometimes sensual, poetry is used as disembodied voice-over or as on-screen text to provide a straightened-out narrative line, or an iconic miniature, for a middlebrow audience.

Introduction By Professor Katie Normington (Dean of  Arts and Social Sciences, RHUL):.

Lecture:

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Vote of Thanks by Dr Miriam Haddu (RHUL).

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James Amelang – Street-Walking, Information, and Citizen Culture in Early Modern Europe

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 30th, 2012

 

Event Date: 30 October 2012



McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London

Egham, Surrey

TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2012/2013

Professor James Amelang ( Universidad Autónoma de Madrid) – Street-Walking, Information, and Citizen Culture in Early Modern Europe

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Pain and Old Age: Three Centuries of Suffering in Silence?

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on October 27th, 2012

Event date: 27 October 2012

Room 416

Birkbeck Main Building

University of London

Malet Street, Bloomsbury

London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Pain Project & Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities present:

Pain and Old Age: Three Centuries of Suffering in Silence?

 

According to the British Pain Society, ‘pain is not a normal part of ageing’ (2008).  Yet for generations of older people, pain was something that was intimately tied to the ageing process.  For many, it was the body in pain that signalled their entry into old age.  Furthermore, the elderly have not wanted to be a ‘burden’ to their families, friends, and support systems, and consequently they often endured pain with a quiet acceptance.  When did this relationship between pain and old age undergo such a profound and fundamental shift?  Or, did it?  Were the elderly in the past always quietly accepting of the aches and pains of a physically declining body?  Or did they fight against pain and the very real physical, emotional, and familial restrictions that chronic pain can impose?

This one-day conference explores the nature of pain in old age between the 18th and the 20th centuries.  It explicitly does so through the lens of the humanities, rather than hard sciences.  The conference strives to be wide-ranging in terms of disciplines, methodologies, and approaches.  In doing so, it seeks to engage both panellists and audience in discussion, dialogue, and debate.  Our aim is to facilitate new ways of thinking about both the nature of pain and what it meant to be old.

Programme:

Welcome by Professor Lynne Botelho (Indiana).

Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck)

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Session I:  Novels and the Narrative Form

  • Dr Charlotte Beyer (Gloucestershire) – Not ‘the Scenic Route’ through Pain and Old Age: Representations of Black British Characters in Andrea Levy and Joan Riley’s Novels

AUDIO HERE

  • Professor Kate de Medeiros (Brookdale Foundation) – Pain, Suffering and Metaphor in Narratives of Older Americans

AUDIO HERE

  • Dr Heike Hartung (Potsdam)  and Dr Aagie Swinned (Maastricht) – Communicating Pain: Representations of Dementia in Old Age

AUDIO HERE

  • Professor Karen Chase (Virginia) – The Humours of Pain

AUDIO HERE

Session I Questions:

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Session II: Medicine and Medical Practice

  • Professor Susannah Ottaway (Carleton College, Canada) – Silencing Pain in Old Age during the Long Eighteenth Century

AUDIO HERE

  • Professor Katherine Walker (McMaster University Canada) – Pain, Age and Surgery in England, c. 1620 – 1740

 AUDIO HERE

Session II Questions:

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Session III:  Piety and the Sense of Self

  • Professor Anne Kugler (John Carroll University) – Suffering, Stoicism and Spirituality: Pain and Fear in Women’s Experience of Ageing

AUDIO HERE

  • Dr Erin Campbell (Victoria, Canada) – Pain, Piety and Ageing: Sacred Suffering in Early Modern Portraits of Old Women

AUDIO HERE

  • Daniel Slater (White Cube Gallery) – Self-Portraits of Pain and Ageing: An Understanding of European Depictions of Self over Time

AUDIO HERE

Session III Questions:

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 Session IV: Old Age and Youth

  • Professor Cynthia Port (Coastal Carolina)  – “The looking glass becomes the feeling glass”: Cognitive Narratology on Empathy and Pain

AUDIO HERE

  • Dr Lisa Wynne Smith (Saskatchewan)- Sir Richard Newdigate, an ‘Old Gentleman persecuted by his own Son’

 AUDIO HERE

  • Professor Denis Martin (Teeside) – Explaining Older People’s Experience of Living with Pain to Young People using a Medikidz Comic Book

AUDIO HERE

Session IV Questions:

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Concluding Remarks

  • Professor Pat Thane (KCL) – Is Growing Older Really Such a Pain?

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Pain as Emotion; Emotion as Pain: Perspectives from Modern History

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on October 26th, 2012

Event date: 26 October 2012

Room B04

Birkbeck Main Building

University of London

Malet Street, Bloomsbury

London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Pain Project & Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities present:

Pain as Emotion; Emotion as Pain: Perspectives from Modern History

‘With the benefit of the past two centuries of scientific work and thought, can one define pain?’ The question was asked by the neuroscientist Edward R. Perl (Nature Reviews: Neuroscience, 8, 2007). He concluded that ‘it seems reasonable to propose pain to be both a specific sensation and an emotion’.

With that, the question of physiological pain opens up to those who study the history of emotions, which in turn gives way to new possibilities of understanding the historical and cultural contingencies of physical pain. The statement also begs the question of the extent to which emotion is in fact pain, if pain is in part emotion. Should the histories of anger, fear, anxiety, grief and compassion be studied as varieties of pain? In what ways have they been understood to have a physiological component? Likewise in histories in which physical pain plays a prominent part – the history of medicine notably – how far should our understanding of pain be influenced by the study of emotionologies that determine how the feeling of pain is expressed? How have emotional contexts affected the experience of pain?

This one-day conference will approach these questions by focusing broadly on the dynamics of the emotional, cultural and medical history of pain in the modern period. The conference aims to foster discussion on the importance of emotion as it relates to physical pain and on emotions themselves as varieties of pain, among experts working on the history of science/medicine, the history of the body, and the history of emotions, with perspectives from a variety of national contexts.

Programme

Welcome: Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck, University of London)

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Introduction: Rob Boddice (Freie Universität)

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Panel 1:   Pain, Metaphor and Medicine

  • David Biro (State University of New York) – Psychological Pain: Metaphor or Reality?

AUDIO HERE

  • Sheena Culley (Kingston University) – Killing Pain: Aspirin and the Emotional

             AUDIO HERE

Panel 1 Questions:

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Panel 2:  Second-hand Pain and the Pain of Others

  • Linda Raphael (George Washington University) – Imagining the Other: Two Cases of Desire and Resistance

             AUDIO HERE

  • Liz Gray (Queen Mary, University of London) – “The writhing of a worm…”: The Role of Pain in Developing Ideas of Comparative Psychology

             AUDIO HERE

  • James Burnham Sedgwick (Acadia University) – Observing Pain, Pain in Observing: Collateral Emotions in International Courts

             AUDIO HERE

Panel 2 Questions:

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 Panel 3: Scripting Pain in Mind and Body

  • Whitney Wood (Wilfrid Laurier University) – “When I think of what is before me, I feel afraid”: Delicate Women and the Pain of Childbirth in Late-Victorian Canada

             AUDIO HERE

  • Daniel Grey (Wolfson College, Oxford) – “The agony of despair”: Pain and the Cultural Script of Infanticide in England and Wales, 1860-1960

             AUDIO HERE

  • Paolo Santangelo (Sapienza University of Rome) – The Perception of Pain in late-Imperial China

             AUDIO HERE

Panel 3 Questions:

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Announcement on future events by Carmen Mangion (Birkbeck).

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Panel 4: The Image of Pain

  • Johanna Willenfelt (University of Gothenburg) – Documenting Bodies: Pain Surfaces

             AUDIO HERE

  • Danny Rees (Wellcome Library) – Down in the Mouth: Faces of Pain

             AUDIO HERE

accompanying images

Panel 4 Questions:

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 Closing Remarks:

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Martin Hägglund – Dying For Time: From Plato to T.S. Eliot

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 25th, 2012

 

Event Date: 25  October 2012
Swedenborg Hall
Swedenborg Society
20-21 Bloomsbury Way
London WC1

The London Graduate School  and the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) present:

Professor Martin Hägglund (Yale University) – Dying For Time: From Plato to T.S. Eliot

Introduction by Professor Simon Morgan Wortham (Kingston).

Talk:

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accompanying images:

Buy Martin Hägglund’s Dying for Time here

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Stefanie Schüler-Springorum – The Witness and the Holocaust – Oral Testimonies and Historical Knowledge

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 24th, 2012

Event Date: 24 October 2012
Chancellor’s Hall
Senate House
Unniversity of London
Malet St.
London WC1E 7HU.

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism
presents:

The Witness and the Holocaust – Oral Testimonies and Historical Knowledge

Making History: Archives, Artefacts and Interpreting the Past – lecture series in partnership with the Wiener Library

Professor Stefanie Schüler-Springorum (Center for Research on Antisemitism, Technical University, Berlin) – The Witness and the Holocaust – Oral Testimonies and Historical Knowledge

In this lecture, Professor Schüler-Springorum explores the role of survivor testimonies in the narrative of the Holocaust. She traces the figure of the survivor “Witness” through almost 70 years, starting with the burning urge to “bear witness” while mass­-murder was taking place, to the present day, and the ubiquitous presence of the “Witness” in museums, memorial sites and on our television screens. Schüler-Springorum will also discuss the potential of witness testimonies as well as their shortcomings in the making of historical knowledge and understanding.

Professor Schüler-Springorum is the Director of the Center for Research on Antisemitism at the Technical University of Berlin. Her specialist areas include German and German-Jewish history of the 19th and 20th century and gender history and the history of Spain in the 20th century.

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Director, Pears Institute).

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The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism

“The relationship between antisemitism and other forms of racism and exclusion is not only a historical question. It is an urgent issue for today.” Professor David Feldman, Director.

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism was established by the Pears Foundation and is based at Birkbeck, University of London. It is a centre of innovative research and teaching, contributing to discussion and policy formation on antisemitism as well as other forms of racial prejudice and intolerance. It is both independent and inclusive.

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Death and the Contemporary: Death and Space

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 23rd, 2012

Event Date: 23 October 2012
The Dead House
Somerset House
The Strand,
London WC2R 1LA
 

 

Death and the Contemporary: Death and Space

‘Death and the Contemporary’ is a series of site-specific events organised by Dr Georgina Colby and Anthony Luvera  that will take
place across London between October 2012 and September 2013. Panel discussions with keynote philosophers, writers, visual artists, and theorists will provide an exciting interdisciplinary forum in which to consider issues surrounding the representation of death in contemporary culture. Audience members will have the opportunity to engage and contribute to these stimulating conversations with leading figures across the disciplines.

Georgina Colby is Lecturer in English at the University of Westminster. Reading across literature and the visual arts, Dr Colby’s work seeks to examine and theorize new modes of literary and cultural recuperation in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. She has published widely in the field of contemporary literature and photography. Her interdisciplinary publications on literature and photography have appeared in the peer review journals Comparative
Critical Studies, Women: A Cultural Review and n.paradoxa: International Feminist Art Journal. She has also recently contributedto Photography: The Whole Story (London: Thames and Hudson, 2012). Her literary criticism has appeared in the journals Textual Practice and Contemporary Literature and she is the author of Bret Easton Ellis: Underwriting the Contemporary (New York: Palgrave, 2011). Before joining Westminster in 2012 Dr Colby was a visiting lecturer
in English and Philosophy at Royal Holloway, University of London, and she continues to deliver a series of lectures in photography at Sotheby’s Institute of Art London.

Anthony Luvera is an Australian artist, writer and educator based in London. His photographic work has been exhibited widely in galleries, public spaces and festivals including the British Museum, London Underground’s Art on the Underground, National Portrait Gallery London, Belfast Exposed Photography, Australian Centre for Photography and Les Rencontres D’Arles Photographie. His writing appears regularly in a wide range of periodicals and peer-reviewed journals including Source, Photographies and Hot Shoe. Anthony lectures at institutions including Central Saint Martins College of Art and Design, London College of Communication and University for the Creative Arts Farnham. He also facilitates workshops and gives lectures for the public education programmes of organisations including the National Portrait Gallery, Barbican Art Gallery and The Photographers’ Gallery.
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Welcome by Sally Taylor (Culture Capital Exchange).

Introduction by Dr Georgina Colby (University of Westminster) and Anthony Luvera

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Speakers:
Professor Tom Hunter ( University of the Arts, London College of Communications)
Tom Hunter is an internationally acclaimed artist whose medium is photography.
Tom graduated from the London College of Printing in 1994. His degree show, The Ghetto, a series of photographs and a model of his squatted neighbourhood, is now on permanent display in the Museum of London. Tom received an MA at the Royal College of Art, where, in 1996, he was awarded the photography prize by Fuji Film for his series Travellers. Tom has exhibited nationally and internationally at venues such as the National Gallery, London, where he held the first solo photography show; the Saatchi Gallery; White Cube; and many others.

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Professor Robert Hampson (Royal Holloway University of London)
Robert Hampson is Professor of Modern Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London, where he is Director of the MA in Literatures of Modernity and teaches on the MA in Poetic Practice. He has published widely on Conrad, Ford, and contemporary poetry. His recent publications include Frank O Hara Now (2011; co-edited with Will Montgomery), Conrad’s Secrets (2012), a volume of poetry, An Explanation of Colours (2011) and the Crater Press pamphlet, Out of Sight (2012).

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Professor David Bate (University of Westminster)
Professor David Bate is a photo-artist and theorist. Recent works includes the books Zone (Artworks, 2012), Photography: Key Concepts (Berg, 2009) and Photography and Surrealism (IB Tauris, 2004). He is currently a Professor of Photography at the University of Westminster, London and co-editor of Photographies journal.

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Dr Andrea Brady (Queen Mary University of London)
Dr Andrea Brady is Senior Lecturer in early modern and contemporary English literature at Queen Mary University of London, where her research interests include poetry, ritual, embodiment, dreams, theories of the imagination and the material conditions of writing. Her books of poetry include Wildfire: A Verse Essay on Obscurity and Illumination (Krupskaya 2010) and the forthcoming Mutability: Scripts for Infancy (Seagull 2012).  She is co-publisher of Barque Press and director of Archive of the Now.

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Panel discussion and audience questions:

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Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra – Resemblance Nominalism, Conjunctions and Truthmakers

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 22nd, 2012

Event Date: 22 October 2012
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra (Oxford) – Resemblance Nominalism, Conjunctions and Truthmakers

Resemblance Nominalism is a theory according to which there are no universals and no tropes. What theories of universals and tropes explain by invoking universals and tropes, Resemblance Nominalism explains by invoking resembling particulars and sets, but sets, although abstract, are particular nevertheless.

Gonzalo Rodriguez-Pereyra is the author of Resemblance Nominalism (Oxford University Press, 2002) and co-editor of Real Metaphysics (Routledge, 2003). He has written many articles on metaphysics and early modern philosophy. He is a Fellow and Tutor at Oriel College, University of Oxford.

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handout (download .doc)

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After Leveson: What sort of Press Regulation?

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 20th, 2012

Event Date: 20 October 2012
Room B01
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

Birkbeck’s Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life is holding a half-day event on the future of press regulation in Britain:

After Leveson: What sort of Press Regulation?

Both panels will be chaired by Tony Wright, Professorial Fellow in the Department of Politics at Birkbeck, Visiting Professor of Government and Public Policy at UCL and former Member of Parliament for Cannock Chase.

Panel 1: What has the Leveson process told us?

With Lance Price (Writer, journalist and former Downing Street media advisor), Joan Smith (journalist), Peter Dobbie (former Political and Executive Editor of the Mail on Sunday), Evan Harris (former MP and adviser to the Hacked Off Campaign).

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Panel 2: The issue of press regulation

With Lance Price (Writer, journalist and former Downing Street media advisor), Joan Smith (journalist), Peter Dobbie (former Political and Executive Editor of the Mail on Sunday), Evan Harris (former MP and adviser to the Hacked Off Campaign), Helen Goodman MP (Labour), Professor Angela Phillips (Goldsmiths, former Guardian journalist), Professor Brian Cathcart (Kingston, former Interdependent journalist) and Professor Jean Seaton (Westminster and official BBC historian).

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Developing Your Research Career – Blogging to Develop Your Career

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 18th, 2012

Event Date: 18 October 2012
Room B04, Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

This is the first seminar in the series, Developing Your Research Career which will look at how to create a useful online profile for professional development purposes. As well as looking at how to establish your online identity it will look at the pros and cons of what and what not to share and the opportunities that participating in online academic communities can offer researchers at all stages of their academic careers.

Speaker: Dr Sarah-Louise Quinnell

Dr Quinnell gained her PhD from King’s College London in 2010. Post-PhD her research has focused on how academics engage with digital learning environments for research and professional development, specifically the formation of learning communities. Sarah is currently the E-Learning Project Lead for the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists where she is leading a research project to design an online learning strategy for continuous professional development training for CSP members. The project is funded through the CSP Charitable Trust. Sarah is a featured blogger for the SAGE resource social sciencespace and in a regular blogger for a number of online publications. She is co-author of the 2012 publication ‘The Connected Academic: A Researchers Guide to Web 2.0 Technology”.

Introduction by Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck).

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