Peter Hallward – Rousseau and Political Will

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 29th, 2012

 

 

 

Event Date: 29 November 2012
Art Wokers Guild, Lecture Hall
6 Queen Square
London
WC1N 3AT

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Peter Hallward (Kingston) -  Rousseau and Political Will

Introduction by Dr Stella Sandford (Kingston).

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Konstantinos Choulis – Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Bookbinding: History and Techniques of Manufacture

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 29th, 2012

Event Date: 29 November 2012 

Royal Asiatic Society

Stephenson Way 
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society and the Studite Project present:

Professor Konstantinos Choulis (Assistant Professor of Book and Paper Conservation, Technological Educational Institute, Athens) – Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Bookbinding: History and Techniques of Manufacture

Welcome by David Jacobs (Royal Asiatic Society).

Introduction by Jim Black (Studite Project):

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Juliet Brodie – The big bang: the impact of twenty years of molecular systematics on understanding the algae

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 28th, 2012

Systematics Association Logo

Event Date: 28 November 2012
The Linnean Society of London
Burlington House, Piccadilly,
London W1J 0BF

 

The Systematics Association presents:

Professor Juliet Brodie (natural History Museum, London) – The big bang: the impact of twenty years of molecular systematics on understanding the algae

Molecular systematics occupies a minute fraction of time in the history of science, but its impact has been transformative in revealing hitherto unrecognised diversity of life on earth. Furthermore, it has enabled us to see the extent of genetic diversity that is not necessarily reflected in the morphology of organisms. This has led to a fundamental shift in species concepts and as a consequence has profound implications for understanding distribution, rarity and endemism. In this talk I will explore these ideas using examples from algal groups I have studied and attempt comparisons with other organisms. I will also argue the necessity of using molecular systematics in understanding the impact of environmental factors such as climate change and ocean acidification.

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Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal – Politics of Distribution: Building Audiences for Bolivian Indigenous Films

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 23rd, 2012

                         

Event Date 23 November 2012
The Court Room, Senate House
University of London
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU

‘Indigeneity in the Contemporary World’ Project presents:

Recasting Commodity and Spectacle in the Indigenous Americas symposium, 22-23 November 2012

Professor Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal (Colegio de Michoacán, Mexico) - Politics of Distribution: Building Audiences for Bolivian Indigenous Films

In this paper I analyse film distribution strategies undertaken by the most important indigenous media initiative of Bolivia, the National Plan of Indigenous Audiovisual Communication (Plan Nacional Indígena Originario de Comunicación Audiovisual). Through ethnographic case studies, I explain how the Plan Nacional reaches rural, urban, national and international audiences while building or reinforcing political alliances with activists, migrants and other indigenous communities and organizations. In these locations, I look at the technological possibilities of video for presenting what Benjamin (1968) would explain as ‘simultaneous collective experiences’, as well as the different economic and political contexts and conditions for video distribution.  I also discuss the tensions involved in the distribution process, such as the prevention of piracy, unresolved attempts to distribute economic benefits, commitment to expectations of funding providers, and the election of technological and narrative elements to meet specific industry standards that in many ways ‘discipline’ the production and distribution processes. An analysis of these issues is useful for understanding how filmmakers’ attempts to challenge established markets of audiovisual production and to prevent their films from circulating as commodities are often limited by their inevitable immersion in a global capitalist system. Finally, I analyse how in such distribution processes, indigenous media makers interact with actors as varied as regional leaders, international activists, film industry people and official authorities; and how, in doing so, they develop mechanisms to make themselves visible by simultaneously emphasizing their national belonging to Bolivia and their difference as indigenous filmmakers.

Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal is researcher and professor at the Centro de Estudios Antropológicos at the Colegio de Michoacán and visiting professor on the MA in Visual Anthropology at FLACSO-Ecuador. Gabriela was born and raised in Mexico City and studied social communication as well as journalism, video and ethnographic photography. In 1993, she began communications projects at a prison, and later worked with Indigenous communities in Chiapas and Oaxaca. In 2009, she received her Ph.D from the City University of New York (CUNY) for a thesis on Indigenous Bolivian video, and during her time in New York she also worked at the Film and Video Center of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. She conducted postdoctoral research at the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris in 2009, and has published widely on visual anthropology, film and photography. Gabriela’s academic work is enriched by her practice as curator of photographic projects and director of personal photographic and video documentary productions.

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Psychoanalysis as epistemology: Psycho-social methods since Doing Qualitative Research Differently

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2012

Event Date: 22 November 2012
Room B04,  Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkeck Institute for Social Research presents:

Psychoanalysis as epistemology: Psycho-social methods since ‘Doing Qualitative Research Differently’

This is the first in the seminar series: Doing Critical Social Research

Speaker: Professor Wendy Hollway (Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Open University)

The second edition of ‘Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview method’(2012) recently provided the authors (Hollway and Jefferson) with an opportunity to review the developments in the field of empirical (qualitative) psycho-social research since its original publication in 2000. Two intervening events had provided debate in the psycho-social community: the 2008 special issue, ‘British Psycho(-)social Studies’ in Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society, and a conference session in 2010at the bi-annual British ESRC Methods Festival for researchers across the social sciences, which organised a session called ‘Reassessing Hollway and Jefferson’s Doing Qualitatively Research Differently, Ten Years On’.  In addition, a steady stream of publications in qualitative research journals demonstrated how the FANI method had been taken up and modified to suit new circumstances. Moreover my own project on the identity changes involved in becoming a mother for the first time, in which psychoanalytic ‘infant’ observation was used alongside the FANI method, required a term with a new breadth: psychoanalytically informed methods. It is not surprising, perhaps, that researchers and professionals involved in some way with psychotherapeutic practices (health and social care workers, psychologists, psychotherapists and counsellors) have shown considerable interest in methods that are consistent in their epistemology with the methods they are trained in as practitioners.

In this talk, I shall be discussing highlights from ten years of methodological development in what is largely British psycho-social research:

  • the defended subject;
  • interpretation;
  • ethics, compassion and power relations;
  • reflexivity (especially the importance of reflecting on emotional responses as the basis for a psychoanalytic epistemology and the use of other minds to help reflection).

Introduction by Professor Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck).

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The Southern Europe Crisis and Resistances

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2012

Event Date: 22 November 2012

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities present:

The Southern Europe Crisis and Resistances

Academics from Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain will discuss the economic, political and humanitarian crisis austerity has created in South Europe. But PIGS can fly. The widespread protests of 2011 have started again in Spain, Portugal and Italy while in Greece the new austerity has brought the government close to collapse. Is austerity or resistance the future of Europe?
Introduction:

Luis Trindade – Chair (Birkbeck).

Speakers:

Andrea Fumagalli (University of Pavia, Italy)

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Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Coimbra University, Birkbeck Leverhulme Fellow)

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Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck)

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Juan Carlos Monedero (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

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Maria Margaronis (journalist for The Nation & The Guardian)

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Michelle H. Raheja – Redfacing Redux: The Afterlife of Native American Images

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2012

                        

Event Date 22 November 2012
The Court Room, Senate House
University of London
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU

 ‘Indigeneity in the Contemporary World’ Project presents:

Recasting Commodity and Spectacle in the Indigenous Americas symposium, 22-23 November 2012

Professor Michelle H. Raheja (UC Riverside) – Redfacing Redux: The Afterlife of Native American Images

For better or worse, Native American images have deeply influenced settler colonial visual culture since at least 1492. From engravings depicting the putative cannibalism and savagery of Indigenous peoples in the sixteenth through seventeenth centuries, to silent cinema and Western films in the twentieth century, to contemporary historical revisionist movies in the first decade of the twenty-first century, Native Americans have been central to European American colonial and nationalist fantasies. Indigenous peoples have also represented settler colonialism since invasion/contact as evidenced by the matachine dances and more recently in contemporary films by Native Americans that critique and re-present the distorted point of view offered up by most mainstream films. In particular, work by filmmakers such as Klee Benally, Marcelina Cárdenas, the Chiapas Media Project, Thirza Cuthand, Chris Eyre, Sterlin Harjo, Igloolik Isuma, Terry Jones, Shelley Niro, Sandra Sunrising Osawa, and many, many others has challenged entrenched stereotypes about Indigenous peoples and offered original, engaging, and insightful self-representations of historical and contemporary communities.

This keynote interrogates what kind of impact, if any, this growing body of important work has had on the general public in the United States and what kind of burden we place on Indigenous filmmakers by expecting them to undo the racist imagery that has been in circulation for the past 500+ years. As I detail briefly in Reservation Reelism (2010), one week after I submitted the revisions of the manuscript to the press editor, I intimately became aware of the persistent, sometimes violent afterlife of mainstream images of Native Americans, despite the resurgence in Indigenous filmmaking during the past twenty years. In November 2008, my daughter’s public elementary school reenacted a Thanksgiving spectacle with children dressing in phantasmic redface costumes and representing Pilgrims as friendly, harmless neighbours. When I queried her school about why this practice would persist in comparison with the much less offensive methods employed to teach histories of other marginalized peoples, the ensuing uproar instigated local and national news coverage; threats of violence against my family; and various forms of electronic harassment that persisted for over a year. Although I employ a very local and personal anecdote to frame my discussion of the afterlife of images of Native Americans, I use it to open up a conversation about the mode of production of Indigenous film, its distribution, and the mass public’s recalcitrant refusal to reconsider Indigenous history through a different lens.

Michelle H. Raheja is Associate Professor in the Department of English and Director of the California Center for Native Nations at the University of California, Riverside. Her work has been published in American Quarterly; American Indian Culture and Research Journal; Talking Back, Moving Forward: Native American/Indigenous Perspectives on Film; and Visualities: Perspectives on Contemporary American Indian Film and Art. Her book, Reservation Reelism: Redfacing, Visual Sovereignty, and Representations of Native Americans in Film was recently published by the University of Nebraska Press. Raheja is of Seneca descent and her research and teaching focus is on early American literature and Native American cultural studies and theory. Last spring she was awarded a Fulbright fellowship to research Sami visual culture in northern Norway and is currently working on two projects: a study of a turn of the twentieth century queer Native American circus performer and a monograph on images of Native Americans and cannibalism in contemporary post-apocalyptic American cinema.

Introduction by Professor Helen Gilbert (Royal Holloway), Director of the Indigeneity in the Contemporary World Project:

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Justice and Security Bill: Covering up State Crimes

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 21st, 2012

Event Date: 21 November 2012
Garden Court Chambers,
57-60 Lincoln’s Inn Fields,
London WC2A

The Haldane Society and the Campaign against Criminalising Communities (CAMPACC) presents:

Justice and Security Bill: Covering up State Crimes

Chaired by Louise Christian, civil liberties and human rights lawyer; Vice-President of Haldane Society of Socialist Lawyers
Speakers:

  • Dinah Rose QC, Blackstone Chambers, who specialises in human rights and public law
  • Richard Norton-Taylor, journalist and writer on defence and security, The Guardian
  • Clare Algar, Executive Director, Reprieve
  • Saghir Hussain, lawyer; Director of CagePrisoners

Open justice is a centuries-old principle of British law. The right to a fair trial is a feature of the common law and is enshrined in the European Convention on Human Rights. These values of fairness and transparency are now under threat in the Justice and Security Bill, which will introduce closed courts and secret evidence for any case which the government says relates to ‘national security’.  Such restrictions threaten the very fabric of the civil legal system.

With increasing allegations of British government collusion in torture abroad over the past decade, the government has gone to great lengths to withhold evidence relating to such claims. Under the guise of growing ‘national security’ concerns in an increasingly global context, the government has also introduced a number of measures to protect the interests of the executive and its agencies.

Applied at the Special Immigration Appeals Commission since 1997, closed courts have failed to ensure fairness and proportionality in proceedings, evidenced by the sizeable related case law.
So. why extend ‘secret evidence’? Who stands to gain? If this Bill is enacted, where will it leave the legal system and the judiciary?
For background information: The Justice and Security Bill: An Affront to Open Justice by Aisha Maniar http://onesmallwindow.wordpress.com/2012/09/18/justice-and-security-bill-an-affront-to-open-justice/

 

Order of speakers: Louise Christian (Chair) , Dinah Rose QC, Richard Norton-Taylor, Clare Algar, Saghir Hussain

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Guy Longworth – Sharing Thoughts About Oneself

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 19th, 2012

Event Date: 19 November 2012
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Guy Longworth (Warwick) – Sharing Thoughts About Oneself

This paper is about first-person thoughts—thoughts about oneself that are expressible through uses of first-person pronouns (e.g. “I”). It is widely held that first-person thoughts cannot be shared. My aim is to postpone rejection of the more natural view that such thoughts about oneself can be shared. I sketch an account on which such thoughts can be shared and indicate some ways in which deciding the fate of the account will depend upon further work.

Guy Longworth is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. His research focuses on the nature of linguistic understanding and its role in the communication of knowledge. He has also written on testimony, generative linguistics, and the work of J. L. Austin.

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Anthony Clavane – Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? The Story of English Football’s Forgotten Tribe

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 15th, 2012

Event Date: 15 November 2012
Woburn Suite,
Senate House, University of London,
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU.

 The Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism presents:

Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? The Story of English Football’s Forgotten Tribe

“Jews don’t do football. Or at least, they don’t play it.”

Drawing on his new book, Does Your Rabbi Know You’re Here? Anthony Clavane dispels this popular myth to reveal the hidden history of Jewish involvement in English football. He argues that football’s transformation from working-class pursuit into a global industry would not have been possible without such forgotten Jewish figures as Harry Morris, Leslie Goldberg, Louis Bookman and Edward Freedman.

Their untold stories, as well as the more familiar rags to riches tales of David Dein, David Pleat and Alan Sugar, are emblematic of an immigrant community’s successful integration into British Society.

Anthony Clavane taught history before becoming a journalist. He wrote on arts and culture for the Independent and now writes about sport for the Sunday Mirror and Blizzard magazine. He has won many awards for his journalism and is author of the critically-acclaimed, Promised Land: A Northern Love Story.

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Director, Pears Institute).

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FAMOUS FOOTBALL TEAMS IN TRAINING NO. 1 LEEDS UNITED

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The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism

“The relationship between antisemitism and other forms of racism and exclusion is not only a historical question. It is an urgent issue for today.” Professor David Feldman, Director.

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism was established by the Pears Foundation and is based at Birkbeck, University of London. It is a centre of innovative research and teaching, contributing to discussion and policy formation on antisemitism as well as other forms of racial prejudice and intolerance. It is both independent and inclusive.

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