Maria Alvarez – Choice and Voluntary Action

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 10th, 2012

Event Date: 10 December 2012
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Maria AlvarezChoice and Voluntary Action

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Denis M. Provencher – Maghrebi-French Disidentifications: Queer Performances of Gender, Religion, and Citizenship

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 5th, 2012

Event Date 5 December 2012
WIN 0-05

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW 20 0EX

 

TRAUMA, FICTION, HISTORY
seminar series

School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures

Professor Denis M. Provencher (Marie Curie International Incoming Fellow, Nottingham-Trent University & Associate Professor, University of Maryland, Baltimore County) – Maghrebi-French Disidentifications: Queer Performances of Gender, Religion, and Citizenship

This talk builds on recent work in anthropology, critical discourse analysis, and performance studies to examine the queer performances of gender, religion, and citizenship by self-identified gay Maghrebi-French men from my recent fieldwork in France. As a point of departure, I draw on José Esteban Muñoz’s notion of ‘disidentification’, which he defines as a strategy of resistance that ‘works on and against dominant ideology’ and that ‘tries to transform cultural logic from within’ a dominant system of identification and assimilation (1999: 11-12). In my own analysis, I examine how two French interviewees of Maghrebi descent, Toufik (2Fik) and Ludovic, ‘disidentify’ or draw on and reshape dominant ways of being and belonging in contemporary France. First, I consider a series of interviews with Toufik (2Fik), a performance artist and photographer, who works from within dominant Western notions of feminism to rewrite longstanding images of Islam in France. I will also present a series of his parodic photographs, which capture encounters between ‘liberated’ and ‘conservative’ Muslims and question dominant images of the subordinate veiled woman, heteronormativity, and traditional masculinity associated with Maghrebi-French families. Next, I consider my interview with Ludovic Lotfi Mohamed Zahed, founder of the French association Homosexuels musulmans de France (HM2F), and analyze his recent essay/autobiography Le Coran et la Chair (2012) to show how his work as an activist, scholar, and religious thinker functions from within dominant Islam and readings of the Coran to reconstruct the ‘good’ practicing Muslim and ‘good citizen’. Indeed, Toufik’s and Ludovic’s stories will help us to see how they must ‘straddle competing cultural traditions, memories, and material conditions’ in their queer performances and they must devise ‘a configuration of possible scripts of self/selves that shift according to the situation’ (Manalansan 2003: x) in order to be heard both in contemporary France and in their families of origin.

Introduction by Professor Colin Davis (SMLLC, RHUL).

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Colin Blakemore – Darwin’s Brain

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 4th, 2012

Event Date: 4 December 2012
The Senate Room
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Institute of Philosophy presents
a series of Lectures by the Third Chandaria Laureate:

Lecture 1

Professor Colin Blakemore ( Director of the IP Centre for the Philosophy of the Senses, Neurons and Knowledge) – Darwin’s Brain

Introduction by Professor Barry Smith (Director, Institute of Philosophy):

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Angela Breitenbach – Aesthetics in Science: A Kantian Proposal

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 3rd, 2012

Event Date: 3 December 2012
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Angela BreitenbachAesthetics in Science: A Kantian Proposal

Can aesthetic considerations legitimately be linked to the empirical success of scientific theories? I suggest that a satisfactory answer to this question should account for the apparent attraction that aesthetic considerations seem to have for scientists, while also explaining the apparent instability of the link between the beauty of a theory and its success. I argue that two widespread tendencies in the literature, Pythagorean and subjectivist approaches, have difficulties meeting this challenge. I propose a Kantian conception of aesthetic judgments as second-order considerations, related to our own intellectual capacities for making sense of the world, and argue that it fares better.
Angela Breitenbach is a Lecturer in the Philosophy Faculty at the University of Cambridge. Her research focuses on the history of modern philosophy, in particular the philosophy of Kant, as well as questions in
philosophy of science, philosophy of biology, and aesthetics. She has published on various aspects of Kant’s philosophy, and is the author of Die Analogie von Vernunft und Natur (The Analogy of Reason and Nature, de Gruyter 2009).
Angela was educated in Cambridge and Berlin, and held a Junior Research Fellowship at Sidney Sussex College, Cambridge. She spent the last three years as a Lecturer at the University of East Anglia before moving to Cambridge in October 2012.

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Peter Hallward – Rousseau and Political Will

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 29th, 2012

 

 

 

Event Date: 29 November 2012
Art Wokers Guild, Lecture Hall
6 Queen Square
London
WC1N 3AT

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Peter Hallward (Kingston) -  Rousseau and Political Will

Introduction by Dr Stella Sandford (Kingston).

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Konstantinos Choulis – Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Bookbinding: History and Techniques of Manufacture

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 29th, 2012

Event Date: 29 November 2012 

Royal Asiatic Society

Stephenson Way 
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society and the Studite Project present:

Professor Konstantinos Choulis (Assistant Professor of Book and Paper Conservation, Technological Educational Institute, Athens) – Byzantine and Post-Byzantine Bookbinding: History and Techniques of Manufacture

Welcome by David Jacobs (Royal Asiatic Society).

Introduction by Jim Black (Studite Project):

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Juliet Brodie – The big bang: the impact of twenty years of molecular systematics on understanding the algae

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 28th, 2012

Systematics Association Logo

Event Date: 28 November 2012
The Linnean Society of London
Burlington House, Piccadilly,
London W1J 0BF

 

The Systematics Association presents:

Professor Juliet Brodie (natural History Museum, London) – The big bang: the impact of twenty years of molecular systematics on understanding the algae

Molecular systematics occupies a minute fraction of time in the history of science, but its impact has been transformative in revealing hitherto unrecognised diversity of life on earth. Furthermore, it has enabled us to see the extent of genetic diversity that is not necessarily reflected in the morphology of organisms. This has led to a fundamental shift in species concepts and as a consequence has profound implications for understanding distribution, rarity and endemism. In this talk I will explore these ideas using examples from algal groups I have studied and attempt comparisons with other organisms. I will also argue the necessity of using molecular systematics in understanding the impact of environmental factors such as climate change and ocean acidification.

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Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal – Politics of Distribution: Building Audiences for Bolivian Indigenous Films

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 23rd, 2012

                         

Event Date 23 November 2012
The Court Room, Senate House
University of London
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU

‘Indigeneity in the Contemporary World’ Project presents:

Recasting Commodity and Spectacle in the Indigenous Americas symposium, 22-23 November 2012

Professor Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal (Colegio de Michoacán, Mexico) - Politics of Distribution: Building Audiences for Bolivian Indigenous Films

In this paper I analyse film distribution strategies undertaken by the most important indigenous media initiative of Bolivia, the National Plan of Indigenous Audiovisual Communication (Plan Nacional Indígena Originario de Comunicación Audiovisual). Through ethnographic case studies, I explain how the Plan Nacional reaches rural, urban, national and international audiences while building or reinforcing political alliances with activists, migrants and other indigenous communities and organizations. In these locations, I look at the technological possibilities of video for presenting what Benjamin (1968) would explain as ‘simultaneous collective experiences’, as well as the different economic and political contexts and conditions for video distribution.  I also discuss the tensions involved in the distribution process, such as the prevention of piracy, unresolved attempts to distribute economic benefits, commitment to expectations of funding providers, and the election of technological and narrative elements to meet specific industry standards that in many ways ‘discipline’ the production and distribution processes. An analysis of these issues is useful for understanding how filmmakers’ attempts to challenge established markets of audiovisual production and to prevent their films from circulating as commodities are often limited by their inevitable immersion in a global capitalist system. Finally, I analyse how in such distribution processes, indigenous media makers interact with actors as varied as regional leaders, international activists, film industry people and official authorities; and how, in doing so, they develop mechanisms to make themselves visible by simultaneously emphasizing their national belonging to Bolivia and their difference as indigenous filmmakers.

Gabriela Zamorano Villarreal is researcher and professor at the Centro de Estudios Antropológicos at the Colegio de Michoacán and visiting professor on the MA in Visual Anthropology at FLACSO-Ecuador. Gabriela was born and raised in Mexico City and studied social communication as well as journalism, video and ethnographic photography. In 1993, she began communications projects at a prison, and later worked with Indigenous communities in Chiapas and Oaxaca. In 2009, she received her Ph.D from the City University of New York (CUNY) for a thesis on Indigenous Bolivian video, and during her time in New York she also worked at the Film and Video Center of the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. She conducted postdoctoral research at the Musée du Quai Branly in Paris in 2009, and has published widely on visual anthropology, film and photography. Gabriela’s academic work is enriched by her practice as curator of photographic projects and director of personal photographic and video documentary productions.

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Psychoanalysis as epistemology: Psycho-social methods since Doing Qualitative Research Differently

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2012

Event Date: 22 November 2012
Room B04,  Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkeck Institute for Social Research presents:

Psychoanalysis as epistemology: Psycho-social methods since ‘Doing Qualitative Research Differently’

This is the first in the seminar series: Doing Critical Social Research

Speaker: Professor Wendy Hollway (Emeritus Professor of Psychology, Open University)

The second edition of ‘Doing Qualitative Research Differently: Free Association, Narrative and the Interview method’(2012) recently provided the authors (Hollway and Jefferson) with an opportunity to review the developments in the field of empirical (qualitative) psycho-social research since its original publication in 2000. Two intervening events had provided debate in the psycho-social community: the 2008 special issue, ‘British Psycho(-)social Studies’ in Psychoanalysis, Culture and Society, and a conference session in 2010at the bi-annual British ESRC Methods Festival for researchers across the social sciences, which organised a session called ‘Reassessing Hollway and Jefferson’s Doing Qualitatively Research Differently, Ten Years On’.  In addition, a steady stream of publications in qualitative research journals demonstrated how the FANI method had been taken up and modified to suit new circumstances. Moreover my own project on the identity changes involved in becoming a mother for the first time, in which psychoanalytic ‘infant’ observation was used alongside the FANI method, required a term with a new breadth: psychoanalytically informed methods. It is not surprising, perhaps, that researchers and professionals involved in some way with psychotherapeutic practices (health and social care workers, psychologists, psychotherapists and counsellors) have shown considerable interest in methods that are consistent in their epistemology with the methods they are trained in as practitioners.

In this talk, I shall be discussing highlights from ten years of methodological development in what is largely British psycho-social research:

  • the defended subject;
  • interpretation;
  • ethics, compassion and power relations;
  • reflexivity (especially the importance of reflecting on emotional responses as the basis for a psychoanalytic epistemology and the use of other minds to help reflection).

Introduction by Professor Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck).

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The Southern Europe Crisis and Resistances

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2012

Event Date: 22 November 2012

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square, Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities present:

The Southern Europe Crisis and Resistances

Academics from Portugal, Italy, Greece, Spain will discuss the economic, political and humanitarian crisis austerity has created in South Europe. But PIGS can fly. The widespread protests of 2011 have started again in Spain, Portugal and Italy while in Greece the new austerity has brought the government close to collapse. Is austerity or resistance the future of Europe?
Introduction:

Luis Trindade – Chair (Birkbeck).

Speakers:

Andrea Fumagalli (University of Pavia, Italy)

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Boaventura de Sousa Santos (Coimbra University, Birkbeck Leverhulme Fellow)

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Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck)

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Juan Carlos Monedero (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)

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Maria Margaronis (journalist for The Nation & The Guardian)

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