Ten Public Lectures on Philosophy, Politics and the Arts

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on January 31st, 2013

                                     

Event Dates: January – May 2013

Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

 

31 January 2013  Howard Caygill (CRMEP) – Philosophy and The Black Panthers

7 February 2013   Sam Weber (LGS)- The Singularity of Literary Cognition

21 February 2013   Étienne Balibar (CRMEP) – A Thought of/from the Outside: Foucault’s Uses of Blanchot

7 March 2013   Simon Morgan Wortham (LGS) – Auto-Immune Narcissism: Hegel to Freud

21 March 2013   Stella Sandford (CRMEP) – A Critical Theory of Sex

18 April 2013   Peter Osborne (CRMEP) – The Postconceptual Condition

2 May 2013   Catherine Malabou (CRMEP) -Whither Materialism? Althusser/Darwin

16 May 2013   Éric Alliez (CRMEP) - Duchamp à Calcutta

23 May 2013   Scott Wilson (LGS) – Spider Universe: Neuroplatonism and the Phobic Cinema of Lars von Trier

30 May 2013   Peter Hallward (CRMEP) – Vitalism or Voluntarism?

No Comments

Howard Caygill – Philosophy and The Black Panthers

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 31st, 2013

                                                                                              

Event Date:  31 January 2013

Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Professor Howard CaygillPhilosophy and The Black Panthers

Howard Caygill (CRMEP) will reflect on the role played by philosophy in forming and articulating the political tactics and strategies of the Black Panthers (originally, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense), the revolutionary African-Amercian organization formed in California in 1966. It will suggest that philosophy provided a position from which the Black Panthers developed a radical politics of race in the USA beyond the religious orientations of the Civil Rights movement and the Nation of Islam.  Focusing on the work of Huey Newton, the talk will emphasise the role played by Plato, Nietzsche and Speech Act Theory in the formulation of a politics of visibility and a performative concept of cultural and political intervention. It will also critically consider the reflections of the French writer Jean Genet on the Black Panthers practice of resistance.

Welcome by Professor Jeremy Till (Head of Central Saint Martins and Pro Vice-Chancellor at the University of Arts, London)

PLAY

 

download

Announcement by Dr Stella Sandford (CRMEP).

Introduction by Christopher Kul-Want (CSM, University of the Arts London).

Lecture:

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

 

 

 

2 Comments

Alison Young – Street Art and the Contemporary City

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 31st, 2013

Event Date: 31 January 2013
Room B36, Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkeck Institute for Social Research presents:

Street Art and the Contemporary City

Professor Alison Young (University of Melbourne) – Street Art and the Contemporary City

What is street art? Who is the street artist? Since the late 1990s, a distinctive cultural practice has emerged in many contemporary cities, involving the placement of uncommissioned artworks in public places. Sometimes considered to be a variant of graffiti, sometimes conceptualized as a new art movement, its practitioners engage in illicit activities while at the same time the resulting artworks can command high prices at auction and have become collectable aesthetic commodities. Street art thus presents challenges to the commonplace taxonomies of culture, law, crime and art. This paper will present findings from a research project funded by the Australian Research Council examining the intricacies of street art as a cultural practice and the motivations of street artists in cities such as New York, Rome, Berlin, London and Melbourne. It will consider the impact of uncommissioned art within the contemporary city, and suggest ways of thinking through the paradoxes of a cultural practice existing at the borders of art and law.

Professor Alison Young teaches and researches in the School of Social and Political Sciences at the University of Melbourne. She has an LL.B (Hons) from Edinburgh University and a Masters and PhD in Criminology from Cambridge University. She is the author of The Scene of Violence (2010), Street/Studio (2010), Judging the Image (2005),Imagining Crime (1996), and Femininity in Dissent (1990), as well as numerous articles on the intersections of law, crime and culture.  Her key research areas are law, art and public culture; cinema and crime; and image studies generally. From 2012-2014, she is carrying out an ARC Discovery Project examining the reception of street art in the cultural field, focusing upon its transformative potential in urban space; its reception and interpretation in the domain of fine arts; and its impact upon the socio-legal regulation of public spaces. She has served as Editor or Associate Editor of a number of journals, including Social and Legal Studies, Feminist Theory, Australian Feminist Law Journal, Australian and New Zealand Journal of Criminology, and Griffith Law Review. From January to March 2013, she will be visiting the University of Westminster’s Centre for International Law and Theory.

Introduction by Professor Sasha Roseneil (Director, BISR).

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

accompanying images:

No Comments

Helen Vassallo – The Day Nina Simone Stopped Singing: Gender, War and Trauma

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 30th, 2013

Event Date: 30 January 2013
WIN 0-05

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW 20 0EX

 

TRAUMA, FICTION, HISTORY
seminar series

Dr Helen Vassallo (Exeter) -  The Day Nina Simone Stopped Singing: Gender, War and Trauma
The Day Nina Simone Stopped Singing is a semi- autobiographical narrative by Lebanese author Darina Al-Joundi, which recounts her coming-of-age during the Lebanese civil war and explores the entwining of socio-historical trauma and personal experience. Al-Joundi was raised in an unorthodox household: her father, a Syrian political exile, wanted to raise his daughters as “free women” in a society which made this “freedom” unrealizable, constraining Darina within other, equally harmful, stereotypes. The analysis thus examines the quest for one woman to find a secular “freedom” in a society characterized by religious conflict and gender inequality, and reveals this quest to be fraught with personal and social trauma. It will conclude by evaluating possibilities for “freedom” in exile in France, considering the extent to which Al-Joundi’s representation of the “free woman” challenges traditional dichotomies between East and West regarding notions of liberty, particularly as they are incarnated by women.

Introduction by Dr Ruth Cruickshank (RHUL).

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Trailer for The Day Nina Simone Stopped Singing (French)

Trailer for The Day Nina Simone Stopped Singing (English)

accompanying images:

No Comments

Jan Tomasz Gross – On the Periphery of the Holocaust in Poland: Killings and Plunder of Jews by their Neighbours

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 28th, 2013

 

 

Event Date: 28 January 2013

Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway University of London
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London  Holocaust Memorial Day Lecture Lecture

 

Professor Jan Tomasz Gross (Princeton) – On the Periphery of the Holocaust in Poland: Killings and Plunder of Jews by their Neighbours

The lecture examines whether killings and plunder of Jews by their neighbours were a relatively widespread social practice, or rather a deviant behaviour by socially marginal elements.

Introduction by Professor Katie Normington (Vice Principal (Staffing) and Dean of Arts & Social Science).

Lecture:

PLAY

 

download

Audience questions and Vote of Thanks by Professor Dan Stone (RHUL)

PLAY

 

download

1 Comment

Dan Stone – The Cheese and the Wurst: Nazism and the Holocaust in Contemporary Culture

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 25th, 2013

 

 

Event Date: 25 January 2013

Clarendon Building
Teeside University
Middlesbrough
Tees Valley
TS1 3BA  UK

Teeside University Holocaust Memorial Day

Teesside University is to mark National Holocaust Memorial Day on 25 January 2013 with a special event on campus – one of the largest events in the country.

Staff, students and the public will be attending the commemoration event which will be hosted by Professor Nigel Copsey and Dr Matthew Feldman and feature the prominent historian Professor Dan Stone who works on historiographical and philosophical interpretations of the Holocaust, comparative genocide, history of anthropology, and the cultural history of the British Right. He is the author or editor of ten books and over fifty scholarly articles.
Keynote speaker Professor Stone, from Royal Holloway University, will be giving an address called ‘The Cheese and the Wurst, Nazism and the Holocaust in Contemporary Culture’. This will be followed by a number of parallel sessions which include ‘The Holocaust on Film’, ‘Writing Holocaust Memoirs’ and ‘Political Religion and the Holocaust’.

 Professor Dan Stone (Royal Holloway) – The Cheese and the Wurst: Nazism and the Holocaust in Contemporary Culture

Lecture:

PLAY

 

download

Audience questions:

PLAY

 

download


Videos mentioned in lecture:

accompanying images:

No Comments

Dreams & Dreaming: Disciplinary Perspectives & Interdisciplinary Dialogue

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on January 25th, 2013

Event Date: 25 January 2013

Room G16
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet St Bloomsbury
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Dreams & Dreaming: Disciplinary Perspectives & Interdisciplinary Dialogue

Studying the phenomenon of dreaming can reveal deep and surprising truths about human experience, consciousness, and memory. Academics from disciplines as diverse as psychology, cognitive neuroscience, cultural studies, philosophy, psychoanalytic studies, anthropology and history can agree with this: but what are the ‘truths’ that these various disciplines have discovered and are they compatible with one another?

When researchers and practitioners in one subject area work largely in isolation from those in others this raises the possibilities that: (a) there are insights and bodies of knowledge in one subject-area that are unknown in subject areas in which they are of direct relevance to live research questions; (b) the assumptions about dreaming that underpin the research methodologies in different subject-areas are different, perhaps even inconsistent.

•  Is the philosopher’s claim that dream experience can be indistinguishable from waking experience consistent with the findings of cognitive neuroscience?
•  What assumptions about the cultural phenomenon of dream reporting do practitioners of the psychoanalytic method make?
•  Is the history of dreaming consistent with the idea that the concept identifies a single subject matter suitable for scientific study?
•  Should the findings of the humanities be constrained by medical practice or scientific understanding, or can they be used to critique them?
•  Does the study of dreaming require an empirical, conceptual, medical, historical, or cultural stance?

This workshop will bring together experts on dreaming to present dream research from the perspective of their discipline. It will be an opportunity for those with other disciplinary perspectives to learn from, to challenge, and to explore alternative ways of understanding dreams. It will also be an opportunity for researchers to reflect collectively on the relationship between the ‘folk psychological understanding’ of dreaming and the understanding encoded in their own and others’ disciplinary approaches. The hope is that participants will form a network of experts opening up potential for future collaborative research and projects.

Read the Workshop Blog here

Programme:

Introduction by  Dr Laura Salisbury (English, Birkbeck).

Dr Laurence Spurling (Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck) – Dream in Analytic Practice

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————-

Josh Cunliffe (Psychosocial Studies, Birkbeck) – Censorship and the Self: Re-thinking the Dream-work

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————–

Professor Jim Hopkins (Psychoanalysis Unit, UCL) – Memory, Homeostasis, and the Meaning of Dreams

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————–

Professor Charles Stewart (Anthropology, UCL) – Dreaming and Historical Consciousness

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————————–

Dr Angus Gowland (History, UCL) – Hobbes on Dreams

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————————

Dr Agnieszka Piotrowska (Psychoanalysis & Film Studies, Birkbeck & University Of Bedfordshire) – Inception — A psychoanalytically informed text?

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————————-

Dr Robin Carhart-Harris (Neuroscience, Imperial College) – Dreamlike states: their relevance to our understanding of the psychology and neurobiology of dreaming

PLAY

 

download

————————————————————————-

Dr Hugo Spiers (Neuroscience, UCL) – The dream life of rats

PLAY

 

download

1 Comment

Interrogating the Social Unconscious

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 25th, 2013

Event Date: 25 January 2013
Room B04, Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research presents:

Interrogating “the Social Unconscious”

What is meant by the concept of “the social unconscious”? What is it trying to capture, and is it a notion that can truly bring sociology and psychoanalysis into dialogue? How is it used in clinical work, and how might it be used in social research?

This seminar features a talk by Earl Hopper, group analyst and psychoanalyst and author of “The Social Unconscious: selected papers” (2003, Jessica Kingsley) and co-editor of  “The Social Unconscious in Persons, Groups and Societies: Volume 1″ (2010, Karnac), followed by responses from Sasha Roseneil, Professor of Sociology and Social Theory, Birkbeck, University of London, and Christopher Scanlon, Consultant Psychotherapist and Group Analyst.

Programme

Welcome and Introduction to the Seminar by Sasha Roseneil and Peter Redman.

Earl Hopper (Group Analyst and Psychoanalyst) – The concept of the social unconscious: in praise of ambiguity and conceptual elasticity

AUDIO HERE

Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck) – Towards a psychosocial critique of “the social unconscious”

AUDIO HERE

Christopher ScanlonOn the problem of talking about where we come from

AUDIO HERE

Open Discussion:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Critical Legal Scholarship and Education: Its Past and Future

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 24th, 2013

Event Date: 24 January 2013

The Swedenborg Hall,
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London WC1A 2TH

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the Birkbeck School of Law present:

 Critical Legal Scholarship and Education: Its Past and Future

On the occasion of the 20th anniversary of the Birkbeck Law School, academics who have influenced legal scholarship reflect on the history and prospects of critical education, research and public engagement.

Speakers:

Chair: Patricia Tuitt (Birkbeck)

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————-

Alan Norrie (Professor of Law, University of Warwick)

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————-

David Kennedy (Manley O. Hudson Professor of Law and Director of the Institute for Global Law and Policy Harvard Law School)

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————-

Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck)

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————-

Nicola Lacey (All Souls College, Oxford)

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Rescue: Memory, Myth and Morality

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 23rd, 2013

 

 

Event Date: 23 January 2013
Macmillan Hall
Senate House, University of London
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU

The Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism
presents:

Rescue: Memory, Myth and Morality

Holocaust Memorial Day event – Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism in partnership with the Institute of Historical Research

A round-table discussion with John Dobai (Holocaust survivor), Professor Tony Kushner (University of Southampton) and Professor Bob Moore (University of Sheffield)

2013 marks the 20th anniversary of the release of Schindler’s List which did much to awaken public consciousness of the role of the rescuer in the Holocaust. Recent exhibitions on the theme of ‘rescue’ at the Imperial War Museum and Wiener Library have highlighted the continuing interest in the subject.
But what did ‘rescue’ consist of? What forms did it take? Is it necessarily an indicator of the perseverance of morality and humanity over evil? To what extent was the rescue of Jews discussed or ignored in Allied nations and in their Jewish communities?
These questions will be addressed by John Dobai, rescued as a child in Budapest, and by scholars Bob Moore and Tony Kushner who, respectively, will explore ‘Jewish Self-help and Gentile rescuers in Western Europe’ and ‘The role of Anglo-Jewry in the rescue (or non-rescue) of European Jews’.

Welcome by Professor  Miles Taylor (Director, IHR)

PLAY

 

download

Introduction by Ludivine Broch (Research Fellow, Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism)

PLAY

 

download

John Dobai  (Holocaust Survivor)

PLAY

 

download

Professor Bob Moore (University of Sheffield)

PLAY

 

download

Professor Tony Kushner (University of Southampton)

PLAY

 

download

No Comments