Rescue: Memory, Myth and Morality

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 23rd, 2013

 

 

Event Date: 23 January 2013
Macmillan Hall
Senate House, University of London
Malet St
London WC1E 7HU

The Pears Institute for the Study of Anti-Semitism
presents:

Rescue: Memory, Myth and Morality

Holocaust Memorial Day event – Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism in partnership with the Institute of Historical Research

A round-table discussion with John Dobai (Holocaust survivor), Professor Tony Kushner (University of Southampton) and Professor Bob Moore (University of Sheffield)

2013 marks the 20th anniversary of the release of Schindler’s List which did much to awaken public consciousness of the role of the rescuer in the Holocaust. Recent exhibitions on the theme of ‘rescue’ at the Imperial War Museum and Wiener Library have highlighted the continuing interest in the subject.
But what did ‘rescue’ consist of? What forms did it take? Is it necessarily an indicator of the perseverance of morality and humanity over evil? To what extent was the rescue of Jews discussed or ignored in Allied nations and in their Jewish communities?
These questions will be addressed by John Dobai, rescued as a child in Budapest, and by scholars Bob Moore and Tony Kushner who, respectively, will explore ‘Jewish Self-help and Gentile rescuers in Western Europe’ and ‘The role of Anglo-Jewry in the rescue (or non-rescue) of European Jews’.

Welcome by Professor  Miles Taylor (Director, IHR)

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Introduction by Ludivine Broch (Research Fellow, Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism)

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John Dobai  (Holocaust Survivor)

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Professor Bob Moore (University of Sheffield)

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Professor Tony Kushner (University of Southampton)

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The Magna Carta in the 21st Century

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 23rd, 2013

                                 

Event Date: 23 January 2013
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Centre for Public History, Heritage and Engagement with the Past, Royal Holloway University of London, presents:

“Magna Carta is not primarily significant for what it was, but rather for what it was made to be”

Erwin Grinswold, Dean of Harward Law School, June 1965

What are we making Magna Carta to be in the 21st century? How is the present shaping how we interpret and promote this medieval event and its legacy? What are the challenges facing those attempting to engage a modern public with a medieval document? This panel discussion aims to explore these and other questions facing those doing public history in the context of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta.

Dr Claire Breay is the Lead Curator of Medieval and Earlier Manuscripts at the British Library, where she manages a team of four permanent and five fixed term curators responsible for the British Library’s collection of western manuscripts produced between antiquity and 1600. She is currently working, among other things, on the British Library’s Magna Carta exhibition, which will open in Spring 2015.

Olivia Nelson is the Magna Carta 2015 Project Officer for the National Trust. Her role is to help the National Trust develop plans to celebrate the 800th anniversary at the NT owned sites at Runnymede and Ankerwycke. Prior to that she was a Senior External Affairs Officer for the National Trust and lobbied on issues covering transport, planning, energy and the historic environment.

Dr Matthew Smith is the Curator of Egham Museum, where he heads up the ‘Magna Carta in Egham’ project. This three-year HLF supported project is designed to enable and encourage community participation in events and activities to mark the 800th anniversary and to build and develop links between the museum, the wider community and other heritage and education institutions.

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