Paul Morland – Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

 

 

Event Date: 26 March 2015
Room 414
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Department of Politics presents:

Dr Paul Morland (Birkbeck)- Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict

with a response from Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange)

“All history is the history of ethnic conflict and in ethnic conflict numbers count.”  With this bold statement, Paul Morland opens his new book which argues that ethnic conflict is pervasive across time and space and those with the weight of numbers on their side, either of soldiers or voters, have at the very least an important advantage and often a decisive one.
It is therefore surprising that little thought has been given to demography in the context of ethnic conflict.  Whilst some consideration has been paid to whether demography causes conflict – when and how particular demographic circumstances may trigger and shape wars and strife – little thinking has been given to how, once conflicts get going, groups use demography as part of their strategy or indeed pursue demography as a strategic goal.
Morland offers a framework for thinking about political demography then uses it to illuminate four cases, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and the USA.  The framework revolves around what he calls ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ demographic engineering. Hard demographic engineering involves creating, moving or destroying people, as with genocide, pronatalism and ethnically selective policies of immigration and emigration.  By contrast, soft demographic engineering encompasses the movement of political or identity boundaries in order to incorporate or exclude.
Examples of the hard form include the expatriation of ‘Indian’ Tamils in Sri Lanka, encouragement of Catholic emigration from Northern Ireland, the high birth rate of both Jews and Arabs in Israel / Palestine and the Back to Africa Movement in the United States.  Examples of soft demographic engineering include the partition of Ireland, the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza and the selective annexation of conquered Mexican territory by the United States.
Teasing out sources and supplementing the secondary record with interviews and archival work, Morland has thrown new light on the workings of ethnic conflict and offers an intriguing and fresh perspective on an important part of the way the world works, relevant for historians, geographers, social scientists and policy-makers alike.

Introduction by Professor Eric Kaufmann (Birkbeck):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Response by Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange):

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

New Drug Seminars – Supply and demand: drug markets in transition

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

Event Date 26 March 2015
van Mildent College
Durham University
Durham
County Durham DH1 3LH

University of Kent presents:

New Drug Seminars

Seminar 2: New Drugs: Supply and demand: drug markets in transition

This is the second event in the ESRC Seminar Series ‘New Psychoactive Substances and Human Enhancement Drugs’.  The seminar will focus on the impacts of new drugs on the culture, organisation and control of drug supply networks and drug market activities. The impacts at the local, regional and international level will be considered and we aim to include sessions that focus on emerging trends in relation to online supply and new technologies; the development of local NPS markets in response to legislative actions against headshops; and emerging trends in club drug markets.

The seminar will be divided into three sessions that explore: (i) online markets and new technologies, (ii) street markets, and (iii) club markets.

Speakers include:  Monica Barratt (National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales); Michael Linnell (independent researcher and practitioner); Professor Rainer Schmidt (University of Vienna); Professor Fiona Measham (University of Durham); Dr Russell Newcombe (3D research); Steve Rolles (Transform);  Charlie McLean & Jennifer Brizell (Liverpool John Moores University); Deirdre Ruane (University of Kent).

Programme:

Welcome Fiona Measham (Professor of Criminology, Durham University):

PLAY

 

download

Introduction and Chair: Steve Rolles (Transform):

PLAY

 

download

SESSION 1
STREET MARKETS AND NPS
Russell Newcombe (Independent Researcher- 3D research) – ‘NPS Taxonomy: A framework for classifying new psychoactive substances’:

PLAY

 

download

Michael Linnell (Independent researcher) – ‘Green Crack’ – the infectious nature of synthetic cannabinoids among vulnerable groups of adults and young people and the tragicomic attempts of the state to control the spice market:

PLAY

 

download

SESSION 2
CLUB and FESTIVAL MARKETS

This roundtable session will examine emerging trends in the supply and consumption of new drugs in nightlife and music settings and the prevention of drug related harms.  The panellists in this session will be Professor Rainer Schmid (Scientific Head of the Viennese drug prevention project checkit!), Professor Fiona Measham (Co-Director of The Loop, a not for profit CIC which provides drug and alcohol harm reduction advice, research, training and drug testing at UK nightclubs and festivals) and Deidre Ruane (PhD student, University of Kent, conducting research into the role of drug checking services in the reduction of NPS-related harm at UK festivals).  The panellist will first introduce their work in the area of new drugs, new technologies and harm reduction within club and festival settings, before opening up the session for discussion and debate.
Chair: Steve Rolles (Transform)
Recording of presentations only:
Professor Rainer Schmid (Scientific Head of the Viennese drug prevention project checkit!):

PLAY

 

download

Deidre Ruane (PhD student, University of Kent, conducting research into the role of drug checking services in the reduction of NPS-related harm at UK festivals):

PLAY

 

download

Professor Fiona Measham (Co-Director of The Loop, a not for profit CIC which provides drug and alcohol harm reduction advice, research, training and drug testing at UK nightclubs and festivals):

PLAY

 

download

SESSION 3
ONLINE MARKETS AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES
Dr Monica Barratt via google+ (National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW Australia)  – ‘Brought up by and in the internet’: First time drug use through cryptomarkets:

PLAY

 

download

Charlie McLean and Jennifer Brizell (PhD students Liverpool John Moores University) – Human Enhancement Drugs (HEDs) and the changing marketplace: From the Daily Mirror to online markets:

PLAY

 

download

Steve Rolles (Transform) – Drugs Markets in transition- key themes emerging from the seminar:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Peter Hallward – Re-educating the Educator

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

Event Date: 12 March 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Professor Peter Hallward (Kingston) – Re-educating the Educator

Introduction by Dr Dean Kenning (CSM):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Jenny Powell – Curating a static collection: Kettle’s Yard as a unique document of Modernism

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 25th, 2015

Event Date: 25 March 2015

Win 005

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Dr Jenny Powell (Kettle’s Yard, Cambridge) - Curating a static collection: Kettle’s Yard as a unique document of Modernism

In 1957 curator and collector Jim Ede open his home – Kettle’s Yard – to the public. He invited Cambridge students and interested acquaintances to enjoy his extensive collection of modern British and international art, which includes works by Ben and Winifred Nicholson, Henry Moore, Henri Gaudier-Brzeska, Joan Miro and Constanin Brancusi. Ede arranged the collection meticulously throughout Kettle’s Yard’s cottages, and extended the spaces with architect Leslie Martin in 1970.  In 1966 Ede gifted the collection to the University of Cambridge, with the clear instruction that his curatorial ‘hang’ should be preserved. This talk discusses the challenges of curating a space that cannot be changed. What does this mean for the collection’s preservation and conservation and how does a unique document of modernism – communicated through a curatorial scheme – function within our expectations of the museum and gallery visit today?

Dr Jennifer Powell, Senior Curator of Kettle’s Yard’s collection and programme will explore these questions. Powell’s research area focuses on sculptural practice in Britain and France from c. 1900 to the 1960s. She has contributed texts to exhibitions such as Modern British Sculpture, R.A., and Schwitters in Britain, Tate, and was formerly a curator of modern British Art at Tate Britain. She is currently preparing a centenary exhibition on the artist Henri-Gaudier Brzeska (whose estate Ede acquired in the mid-1920s) entitled NEW RHYTHMS.

Introduction by Dr Laura McCulloch (RHUL):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Response by Dr Ruth Livesey (RHUL):

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Margaret Bird – Inculcating an appreciation of time pressure in the young: the training of children for working life in 18th-century England

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 24th, 2015

Event Date: 24 March 2015

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Margaret Bird (RHUL) – Inculcating an appreciation of time pressure in the young: the training of children for working life in 18th-century England

The rearing of children has been a topic at the centre of academic debate since the Annales historian Philippe Ariès analysed le sentiment de l’enfance in 1960.
Margaret Bird’s exploration of the tensions between respecting children as individuals and the need to hurry them into maturity for working life relates to the mercantile and manufacturing class in England. Understanding time pressure, as in expecting six-year-olds to watch the clock, formed part of their moulding as useful members of society. Time-conscious capitalism and Calvinism lay behind much of the thinking. It draws in part on the newly published diary of Mary Hardy, wife of a farmer and manufacturer.

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

accompanying images:

1 Comment

Mark Gardner – Contemporary Antisemitism in Britain

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2015

 

Event Date: 23 March 2015
The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London WC1B 5DP

 

The Wiener Library presents:

Mark GardnerContemporary Antisemitism in Britain

Mark Gardner will discuss contemporary antisemitism, including developments from the 1990s to the present day and whether or not it is accurate to state that antisemitism is increasing. This will draw upon much of Mark’s own experience at CST, including the threat of antisemitic terrorism, the actuality of antisemitic race hate attack levels and the development of discourse against Jews and about Jewish issues.
Mark Gardner has worked full time for Community Security Trust (and its predecessor, Community Security Organisation) since 1989. Having been Director of Research, he is now Director of Communications and Deputy Director of Operations: positions he has held since 2005.
As Director of Communications, Mark plays a lead role in co-ordinating UK Jewish media and political responses on CST’s core issues of antisemitism, policing, security and terrorism. He is frequently quoted in Jewish, UK and international media; and speaks regularly at public meetings and conferences on these subjects.
Mark has represented CST and the Jewish community to Government and international bodies on numerous occasions, including the 2006 Parliamentary Inquiry into Antisemitism, and various European Union committees and anti-racism research projects. He was awarded a Metropolitan Police commendation for his advisory role on behalf of all London’s minority communities during the Nazi nail bombing campaign of 1999.
Mark has authored many articles and CST reports on antisemitism, policing, security and terrorism.

Introduction by Professor Philip Spencer (Kingston):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism (London)

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2015

  

Event Date: 21 March 2015

Day 2 (London)
Room B01 Clore Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the School of Humanities at Canterbury Christ Church University present:

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism

Politics is dead, dying, or changing into something new. The word ‘ideology’ has become a term of abuse, associated especially with the ‘utopian’ old left. Commitment and belief have become ‘tribalism’ and ‘dogma’. Technocracy, pragmatism, and single-issue campaigns are the order of the day. As the public tune out and turn away, politicians perform increasingly desperate acts of self-abasement. Anti-Westminster mavericks are on the rise. Everywhere there are calls to shrink the state.Yet a politics that exists outside the theatre of the state has yet to be imagined.

As the 2015 election fast approaches, this conference will explore the ideological, cultural, linguistic and historical dimensions of the contemporary postpolitical moment, and its relationship to neoliberalism. With participants drawn from academic, writing, and campaigning backgrounds, the conference will bring together a range of approaches in order to grasp the enduring subtext of the all-consuming and all-erasing daily news churn.

Programme:

Day 2 (London)

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Welcome

PLAY

 

download

===================================

Session One: Hegemony, consent and resistance

Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck) – Radical philosophy reads the age of resistance

AUDIO HERE

Jeremy Gilbert (East London) – Hegemony and Consent in a post-political age

AUDIO HERE

Panel Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Iain MacKenzie (Kent)

=====================================
Session Two: Post-political politics

Nina Power (Roehampton) – The Post-Political = The Most Political

AUDIO HERE

Ben Little (Middlesex) – The meaning of Russell Brand

AUDIO HERE

Panel Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Andre Barrinha (CCCU)

=====================================

Session Three: British politics at the crossroads

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Ideology, authority and populism

AUDIO HERE

John Crace (Guardian) – Why Politicians lie

AUDIO HERE

Panel Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Marissia Fragkou (CCCU)

======================================
Keynote Lecture: Chantal Mouffe (Westminster) – The future of democracy in a post-political age

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Nina Power  (Roehampton)

======================================

Concluding panel discussion: Esther Leslie, Chantal MouffeZoe Wiliams, Nina Power, Costas Douzinas

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Eliane Glaser

======================================
Drinks – all welcome

Afterword: Zoe Wiliams:

PLAY

 

download

<<Day 1 of the ‘Postpolitics and Neoliberalism’ conference was held at Canterbury Christ Church University of London and is available to listen to here>>

1 Comment

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism (Canterbury)

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 20th, 2015

Event Date: 20  March 2015

Day one (Canterbury)
Ng03 Lecture Theatre
Newton Building
Canterbury Christ Church University
North Holmes Road Campus
Canterbury CT1 1QU

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the School of Humanities at Canterbury Christ Church University present:

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism

Politics is dead, dying, or changing into something new. The word ‘ideology’ has become a term of abuse, associated especially with the ‘utopian’ old left. Commitment and belief have become ‘tribalism’ and ‘dogma’. Technocracy, pragmatism, and single-issue campaigns are the order of the day. As the public tune out and turn away, politicians perform increasingly desperate acts of self-abasement. Anti-Westminster mavericks are on the rise. Everywhere there are calls to shrink the state.Yet a politics that exists outside the theatre of the state has yet to be imagined.

As the 2015 election fast approaches, this conference will explore the ideological, cultural, linguistic and historical dimensions of the contemporary postpolitical moment, and its relationship to neoliberalism. With participants drawn from academic, writing, and campaigning backgrounds, the conference will bring together a range of approaches in order to grasp the enduring subtext of the all-consuming and all-erasing daily news churn.

Programme:

Day one (Canterbury)

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Welcome

PLAY

 

download

===================================

Keynote Lecture – Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester) – Insurgent Cities: Post-Politicization and the Spectral Return of the Political
Chair: Eliane Glaser

AUDIO HERE

===================================

Session One: Paradigms and the imagination

Neal Lawson (Compass) – Politics for and by the people

AUDIO HERE

Andrew Simms (New Economics Foundation) – Paradigm shift or bust

AUDIO HERE

Panel Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Jim Butcher (CCCU)

===================================
1200-1300 – Session Two: Democracy and emancipation

David Bates (CCCU) – ”The Political” and Emancipatory Politics – Reflections on Laclau and Mouffe

AUDIO HERE

Lars Cornelissen (Brighton) – Rethinking neoliberal de-democratisation

AUDIO HERE

Panel Questions:

PLAY

 

download

Chair: Darren Ambrose

====================================
Session Three: Rereading the ideologically ‘neutral’: urban planning, education, and cyber-security

Owen Hatherley (writer) – A Bit Of Development Is Always Good’: Planning, politics, indifference and boosterism in the British city

AUDIO HERE

——————————-

Chris Carpenter (CCCU) – To what extent is Educational policy under the coalition government (2010-present) ideologically ‘neutral’?

AUDIO HERE

——————————

Andre Barrinha (CCCU) – Ideology, neoliberalism and cyber security

AUDIO HERE

Chair:  Bojan Koltaj (CCCU)

====================================
Session Four: Morals, ethics and theology

Jim Butcher (CCCU) – Care, responsibility and the politics of ethical lifestyle

AUDIO HERE

—————————

Joe Bennett (Birmingham) – The politics of moral talk

AUDIO HERE

————————–

Bojan Koltaj (CCCU) – Can Theology Really Redeem Politics?

AUDIO HERE

Chair: David Bates

<<Day 2 of the ‘Postpolitics and Neoliberalism’ conference was held at Birkbeck University of London and is available to listen to here>>

 

1 Comment

Claudia Olk – Beckett’s Shakespearean Echoes

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 19th, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 19 March 2015
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Claudia Olk (Berlin Free University) – Beckett’s Shakespearean Echoes

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

No Comments

Greece and Europe: A First Account of a Radical Government

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2015


Event Date: 18 March 2015

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Greece and Europe: A First Account of a Radical Government

Speakers:  Costas Douzinas Paul Mason (Channel 4 News) &  Slavoj Zizek

This roundtable discussion will begin with a screening of a 15 minute film made by Paul Mason: Greece: The End of Austerity?

Introduction by Maria Aristodemou (Birkbeck):

PLAY

 

download

Film:

GREECE: THE END OF AUSTERITY?

Talk (order of speakers: Costas Douzinas, Slavoj Zizek, Paul Mason):

PLAY

 

download

Audience Questions:

PLAY

 

download

2 Comments