Simon Morgan Wortham – Realism and psychosis

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 18th, 2014

Event Date: 18 December 2014
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Simon Morgan Wortham (The London Graduate School – Kingston University) - Realism and psychosis

In ‘Judiciousness in Dispute’ Lyotard gives us an image of the seventy-four year old Kant beset by a near-permanent head cold. Here, while the mind, through a sheer effort of will, has the capacity to overcome a variety of ailments, thought nevertheless causes it severe pain, a pain to which it is not just opposed, but which indeed accompanies its very operation. To the extent that this ambivalent relationship to pain is insurmountable, the ageing philosopher’s inflammation of the head is linked to what Kant himself describes as an involuntary spasmodic state in the brain, that is, a certain inability to maintain concepts, or to secure the unified consciousness of related representations, which Lyotard wants to suggest is fundamental or necessary, rather than merely contingent upon an ailment contracted late in life. To what extent is post-Kantian thought in pain? In what ways is such ‘pain’ prolonged in philosophies that seek a radical departure from Kant? For instance, in seeking an exit from the subjective representation of objects (for Lyotard, the source of Kant’s ‘pain’)? Does speculative materialism risk a certain lapse into a psychotic state that—as both Lacan and Kristeva suggest—may be arrested only through the onset of phobia?

Introduction by Christopher Kul-Want (CSM):

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New Drug Seminars – New Drugs: New Policy Landscapes

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 16th, 2014

 

Event Date 16 December 2014
Kent Business School
The University of Kent,
Canterbury,
Kent, CT2 7NZ

University of Kent presents:

New Drug Seminars

Seminar 1: New Drugs: New Policy Landscapes

Growing concern about new psychoactive substances and other new drugs has led to the development of novel policy responses across the globe.  The seminar will focus specifically on the results of the recent ministerial review into new psychoactive substances policy in the UK.  The main part of the seminar will be devoted to an introduction to the ministerial review followed by a round table debate on its expected impact on various stakeholders (for example, practitioners, police, and policy makers).  It will also include several ‘impulse’ presentations on new work being conducted by postgraduate students in this exciting area.

Programme

Welcome by  Dr Caroline Chatwin (Kent):

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Introduction to ministerial review on NPS, Andrew Brown (Drugscope):

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Roundtable on ministerial review on NPS, Chaired by Professor Harry Sumnall.  Participants include: Dean Acreman  (WEDINOS Project, Welsh Government), Pete Burkinshaw (Alcohol, drug and tobacco division, Public Health England), D. I. Ian Goldsborough (Metropolitan Police),  Beverly Francis (Head of Drugs Policy Unit, Scottish Government),  Nicola Singleton, (Freelance analyst and researcher), and Rick Bradley (KCA drug and alcohol charity).

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Pushing the boundaries of our understandings of new drugs, Chaired by Dr Kate O’Brien

Speakers:

Rosa Goenraadt (Utrecht University)Demand and (online) supply of illicit lifestyle pharmaceuticals

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Katinka van de Ven (University of Kent)The expansion of the anti-doping movement

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Liviu Alexandrescu (Lancaster University) – Legal highs and speed bodies in post-communist Romania

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Rebecca Crook (Liverpool John Moores University) – An exploration of the concept of ‘identity’ in non-dependent drug users (including NPS)

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Pits and Perverts Revisited: ‘Pride’ the movie and politics now!

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 12th, 2014


Event Date: 12 December 2014

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Raphael Samuel History Centre presents:

Pits and Perverts Revisited: ‘Pride’ the movie and politics now!

Enjoyed and inspired by ‘Pride’ the film? Come and see a short documentary about the real story and hear from two of the key people portrayed in the film. This will be followed by a panel discussion about  its relevance for politics today.  And stay on for drinks….

Speakers will include:

Mike Jackson- founder member of Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners – LGSM (one of the main characters in the film)

Siân James - Member of Parliament for Swansea East (one of the main characters in the film)

Diarmaid Kelliher - University of Glasgow. Author of ‘Solidarity and Sexuality: Lesbians and Gays Support the Miners 1984–5’ (History Workshop Journal 2014)

Bev Skeggs - Professor of Sociology, Goldsmiths, University of London

Daniel Monk –  (Chair) Birkbeck, University of London & Director, BiGS

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Introduction and initial discussion with Daniel MonkSiân James and Mike Jackson:

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Then a 20 minute documentary:

Diarmaid Kelliher:

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Bev Skeggs:

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Further discussion and audience questions:

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Michel Rosenfeld – Post-Secular Constitutionalism

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 12th, 2014

Event Date: 12 December 2014
Room B35
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Birkbeck School of Law presents:

Leverhulme Lecture II

Professor Michel Rosenfeld (Cardozo School of Law, New York) - Post-Secular Constitutionalism

Professor Michel Rosenfeld discusses how modern constitutionalism based on the ideals of the Enlightenment favours secularism over religion, relegating the latter for the most part to the private sphere. In more recent times, constitutional secularism has been attacked as anti-religious rather than neutral, but arguably this objection can be overcome from a pluralist perspective that places secularism as an ideology alongside other religious and non-religious ideologies found within the polity.

Michel Rosenfeld is Professor of Human Rights and director of the Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, New York; and the co-editor (with Susanna Mancini) of Constitutional Secularism in an Age of Religious Revival OUP (2014). His visit to Birkbeck School of Law is courtesy of a grant from the Leverhulme Trust, whose support is gratefully acknowledged.

Introduction by Dr Marinos Diamantides (Birkbeck):

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Lecture:

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Julie Sanders – “Full of Noises”: The adaptation of Shakespeare in music

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 11th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 11 December 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Julie Sanders (Nottingham University) – “Full of Noises”: The adaptation of Shakespeare in music

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Sussan Babaie – A nan-o halva (Bread and Sweets) in the V&A: Thoughts on the Aesthetics of ‘taste’

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 11th, 2014

Event Date: 11 December 2014
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Dr Sussan Babaie (Courtauld Institute) -  A nan-o halva (Bread and Sweets) in the V&A: Thoughts on the Aesthetics of ‘taste’

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (President, RAS):

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Israel and Antisemitism in Britain: Now and in the Future

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 10th, 2014

Event Date: 10 December 2014
Room B01
Clore Management Building,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet St
London, WC1E 7HX

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism presents:

Israel and Antisemitism in Britain: Now and in the Future

A Panel Discussion

Speakers: Rt. Hon. Baroness Warsi PC; Eve Garrard, University of Manchester; Ed Kessler, Woolf Institute, University of Cambridge; Brian Klug, University of Oxford; Daniella Peled, journalist

The summer of 2014 will be remembered by many for the conflict between Israel and Gaza brought so vividly into our homes through daily news reporting.  Its repercussions were also felt in Britain in another way, marked by a dramatic increase in recorded antisemitic incidents.

This panel discussion will reflect on the ways in which antisemitism figured in the controversies caused by the conflict.  The speakers, representing a range of views on both Israel and Palestine and on the nature and significance of antisemitism in Britain, will explore: is there a climate of rising antisemitism in Britain? Does the charge of antisemitism levied at the critics of Israel silence legitimate concerns? What is the relationship between Israel and antisemitism in Britain today and how should the experiences of the summer inform debate in the future?

About the speakers:

The Rt. Hon. Baroness Warsi PC, was the first Muslim Cabinet Minister, appointed to office in 2010, and also Chairman of the Conservative Party from 2010-2012. In 2012 she became Minister for Faith and Communities and Senior Minister of State at the Foreign and Commonwealth office. Baroness Warsi resigned from Government in August 2014 over the Government’s stand on Gaza.

Eve Garrard is a moral philosopher and Honorary Research Fellow at the University of Manchester. Her current research interests focus on investigation of the concepts of evil and forgiveness. She is also a contributor to the on-line journal fathom.

Dr Edward Kessler MBE is founder and Executive Director of the Woolf Institute and a leading thinker in interfaith relations, primarily, Jewish-Christian-Muslim relations. He is vice-Chair of the Commission on Religion and Belief in British Public Life, chaired by Baroness Butler-Sloss. His most recent book is entitled, Jews, Christians and Muslims (SCM Press, 2013).

Dr Brian Klug is Senior Research Fellow and Tutor in Philosophy at the University of Oxford. His research interests lie in ‘race’, racialisation and multiculturalism; Islamophobia and antisemitism; and Jewish identity. He is the author of Being Jewish and Doing Justice: Bringing Argument to Life (Vallentine Mitchell, 2011).

Daniella Peled is an editor at the Institute for War and Peace Reporting. A former foreign editor of the Jewish Chronicle, she writes widely on Israel and Palestine and is a regular contributor to Ha’aretz.

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Pears Institute):

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Dr Eve Garrard:

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Baroness Warsi:

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Dr Edward Kessler MBE:

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Daniella Peled:

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Dr Brian Klug:

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Audience Questions and Responses:

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Helen Graham – Stories to Get By: Margaret and Rudolf Michaelis

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 9th, 2014

Event Date: 9 December 2014

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Professor Helen Graham (RHUL) – Stories to Get By: Margaret and Rudolf Michaelis

‘I have not spoken for hours, for months, and in fact for years from the sources of my real being [...] My strength of recovery comes from that waiting within me [...] How else would I have survived the many deaths I have died? (Margaret Michaelis, 1954)
This paper will offer an extract from two of the ‘lives’ featured in the book I’m currently completing, After the wars in Spain: lives salvaged from the dark twentieth century.
It is conceived as a set of interwoven biographies – of five turbulent, charismatic and exceptional lives that, while always remaining themselves, together tell the story of Europe’s dark twentieth century, and in ways that speak directly to current times. All of these lives pass through the Spanish civil war and are transformed by it. But the stories are as much about what happens ‘after Spain’, and the book’s canvas extends, through exile, displacement and diaspora of various kinds, to North America and Australia, then back again to Europe. It traces the workings of inexorable, often cataclysmic, historical change through the indelible marks it left on five signal lives, for whom World War II’s ending did not bring peace.

Talk:

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Nick Fielding – Thomas and Lucy Atkinson and their travels in Central Asia

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 5th, 2014

Event Date: 5 December 2014
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Nick FieldingThomas and Lucy Atkinson and their travels in Central Asia

In February 1848 the explorer and artist Thomas Witlam Atkinson left Moscow with his new bride, Lucy, on a journey that would last for almost seven years. During the course of their remarkable 40,000-mile journey they visited parts of Siberia and Central Asia that had never been seen before by Europeans. This talk, by journalist and author Nick Fielding, will describe the Atkinsons’ foray into present-day Kazakhstan, where they spent almost a year in the most remote outpost of the Russian Empire – and where Lucy gave birth to their only child. He will describe his visit this summer to some of the places described by the Atkinsons and put their journey into the context of nineteenth century great power politics.

Nick Fielding is a former senior reporter on The Sunday Times and was chief investigative reporter on the Mail on Sunday. He now works as a reporter for the investigative news website Exaro. He was launch editor for the online magazine, China Outlook, and he writes the Circling the Lions Den blog about Afghanistan.

Introduction by Dr Alison Otha (Director, RAS):

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Thanks by His Excellency Mr Erzhan Kazykhanov, the Kazakh Ambassador:

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Catherine Malabou – Relinquishing the transcendental? Speculative realism in question

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 4th, 2014

Event Date: 4 December 2014
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Catherine Malabou (CRMEP, Kingston University) – Relinquishing the transcendental? Speculative realism in question

Is contemporary continental European philosophy preparing itself to break with Kant? An attack upon supposedly indestructible structures of knowledge is occurring: finitude of the subject, the phenomenal given, a priori synthesis. “Relinquishing the transcendental” is the leading project of postcritical thinking in the early twenty-first century, in particular as it appears in Quentin Meillassoux’s book After Finitude. Some questions it seemed could never be raised after the Critique of Pure Reason are reappearing with a renewed force: Was Kant genuinely able to deduce categories instead of imposing them, to prove the necessity of nature, to found the difference between “a priori” and “innate”? Should we consider, on the contrary, that the “problem of Hume”—the existence of an irreducible contingency of the world—was never settled by the Transcendental Deduction? Such a claim implies that we have provided a sufficiently convincing concept of the irregularity of the laws of nature and of the possibility of a totally different world. Does After Finitude elaborate such concepts?

Introduction by Dr Jamie Brassett (CSM):

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