Au Pairing After the Au Pair Scheme – ESRC Research Project Dissemination Event

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 17th, 2014

Event Date: 17 October 2014
Keynes Library
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, Birkbeck, University of London presents:

‘Au Pairing After the Au Pair Scheme’ – ESRC Research Project Dissemination Event

A ‘perfect storm’ of long working hours, high childcare costs, the cultural devaluing of reproductive labour and the availability of a large, low-waged labour force from other EU countries, make the UK home to up to 90,000 au pairs at any one time – probably the largest number anywhere in the world.  For many British families au pairs are the only workable solution to the ‘childcare crisis’ but they are only affordable because their work is not recognised and their poor conditions are justified through discourses of cultural exchange and adventure.

In November 2008 the UK government deregulated au pairing, removing all official guidance about what an au pair could or couldn’t do and all protections for au pairs in terms of working hours, pay and living conditions.  This event reports on findings from a two-year ESRC funded research project that has been investigating the effects of this deregulation and considers the importance of au pairs to UK families.  Au pairing is a significant form of low-paid domestic labour that is depended upon by tens of thousands of households in order to balance the demands of work and family life.

The project brings together two important issues for contemporary society – women’s changing relationship to the home and paid work and the growth in labour migration.  It worked with au pairs and host families, stakeholders in the sector and collected data from 1000 advertisements for au pair posts in order to understand what au pairing is in contemporary Britain and what part it plays in the lives of au pairs.

Speakers:

Bridget Anderson (COMPAS University of Oxford)
Nicky Busch (Birkbeck)
Rosie Cox (Birkbeck)
Helle Stenum (Roskilde University, Denmark)

Programme:

Welcome by Professor Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck):

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Introduction by Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck):

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Panel One

Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck):

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Dr Nicky Busch (Birkbeck):

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Panel discussion:

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Panel Two

Dr Helle Stenum (Roskilde University, Denmark):

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Professor Bridget Anderson (COMPAS University of Oxford):

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Panel discussion:

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Mary Beth Mader – Whence intensity? Deleuze and the revival of a concept

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 16th, 2014

 

Event Date: 16 October 2014
Room JG5002,
John Galsworthy Building,
Penrhyn Road Campus, Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University presents:

Professor Mary Beth Mader (Memphis University) – Whence intensity? Deleuze and the revival of a concept

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (CRMEP):

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Chantal Schutz – The scholar’s melancholy is emulation; the musician’s, fantastical: Shakespeare and Dowland

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 16th, 2014

                                                   

Event Date: 16 October 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Chantal Schutz (University of Paris III) with Jamie Akers, lute – “The scholar’s melancholy is emulation; the musician’s, fantastical”:  Shakespeare and Dowland

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Minna Moore Ede – Making a Space for Art: Two case studies: Titian Metamorphosis 2012, National Gallery, London and Sampling the Myth, Royal Opera House, London

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 15th, 2014

Event Date: 15 October 2014

Picture Gallery

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

A talk by Dr Minna Moore-Ede on the occasion of the launch of the HARC 2014-15 Fellowship project ‘Making Space for Art’, a collaboration between the curator of the Picture Gallery at Royal Holloway, Dr Laura MacCulloch, and the Visual Arts and Cinema Research Group in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Dr Minna Moore Ede (National Gallery, London) – Making a Space for Art: Two case studies: Titian Metamorphosis 2012, National Gallery, London and Sampling the Myth, Royal Opera House, London

Discussants: Professor Ahuvia Kahane (Classics) and Dr Libby Worth (Drama)

Dr Minna Moore Ede is Assistant Curator of Renaissance Paintings at the National Gallery, London. She completed her Ph.D. at Keble College, Oxford in 2002 on Religious Art and Catholic Reform in Italy 1527-1546. Since then she has written and worked on a number of exhibitions at the National Gallery that include Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan (2011), Renaissance Faces (2008-9), Rubens: A Master in the Making (2006), Raphael: from Urbino to Rome (2004), Polidoro da Caravaggio: The Way to Calvary (2003) and Metamorphosis: Titian 2012.

Introduction by Dr Giuliana Pieri (RHUL):

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Talk:

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Discussion with Dr Giuliana Pieri (Italian, RHUL), Dr Libby Worth (Drama, RHUL) and Professor Ahuvia Kahane (Classics, RHUL):

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Dan Stone – Assessing Holocaust Survivors: Jewish DPs and the International Refugee Organisation in the Early Cold War

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 14th, 2014

Event Date: 14 October 2014

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Professor Dan Stone (RHUL) – Assessing Holocaust Survivors: Jewish DPs and the International Refugee Organisation in the Early Cold War

This talk looks at the ways in which the International Refugee Organisation (the forerunner to UNHCR) assessed Displaced Persons for assistance with relocation to new countries in the late 1940s. Where today we might see Holocaust survivors clearly in need of help, at the time of the early Cold War the IRO’s assessors were just as likely to see ‘economic migrants’ and feared that assisting these refugees would mean importing a potential communist threat.

Introduction by Professor Greg Claeys (RHUL):

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Stanley Fish – But We’re Professors: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 10th, 2014


Event Date: 10 October 2014
John Snow Lecture Theatre
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Keppel St, Bloomsbury,
London WC1E 7HT

Birkbeck School of Law presents:

Annual Law Lecture 2013

‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

The 2014 Annual Law Lecture presented by the School of Law, Birkbeck is ‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States by

Professor Stanley Fish (Florida International University College of Law)

Justification is the key issue in any discussion of academic freedom. Why should academics be granted latitudes and privileges denied to other workers in other professions? One answer sometimes given to this question is that academics are exceptional or uncommon, “men of high gift and character”, and therefore should not suffer under the constraints imposed on ordinary people. In this lecture, Professor Fish explores this claim of academic exceptionalism as it turns up in public employee law in the United States.

Introduction by Professor Patricia Tuitt (Dean, Birkbeck School of Law):

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Lecture:

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Audience Questions:

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Paul Brass – Criminalization of Politics in India

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 9th, 2014

Event Date: 9 October 2014
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor (Emeritus) Paul Brass (University of Washington) – Criminalization of Politics in India

Criminality is widespread in Indian politics, but there are some landmark districts in parts of Uttar Pradesh, which are famous for it. In my own recent field work in India, I have found the area in central U.P. around the districts of Firozabad, Farrukhabad, and Auraiya to be especially rich in criminality, involving fatal attacks on political rivals and kidnapping and killing even of children. However, it is widespread elsewhere, in other parts of U.P. Moreover, everybody knows who the criminal politicians are and most of them remain free to carry out their criminal activities or, rather, to have lackeys carry them out for them. The names and criminal history of the politicians who are notorious for such violence are well known and published in the newspapers. Very few of these known criminals ever spend time in jail, though there are some who do. Whether or not these criminals land in jail or not, and for how long depends upon their political relationship with the ruling party of the day.

Paul R. Brass is Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has published numerous books and articles on comparative and South Asian politics, ethnic politics, and collective violence. His work has been based on extensive field research in India during numerous visits since 1961. He has been a University of Washington faculty member and Professor, Department of Political Science and The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies since 1965. He received his B.A. in Government in 1958, Harvard College; his M.A. in 1959, in Political Science, University of Chicago; and his Ph.D. in 1964, in Political Science, University of Chicago. His teaching specializations include comparative politics (South Asia), ethnicity and nationalism as well as collective violence.
His most recent books are The Politics of Northern India: 1937 to 1987—Volume I (An Indian Political Life: Charan Singh and Congress Politics, 1937 to 1961) (SAGE, 2011), Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal (2010), Forms of Collective Violence: Riots, Pogroms, and Genocide in Modern India (2006), The Production of Hindu–Muslim Violence in Contemporary India (2003), Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence (1997), Riots and Pogroms (1996), and The Politics of India since Independence, 2nd ed. (1994).

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (RAS):

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Adrian Moore – Being, Univocity and Logical Syntax

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 6th, 2014

Event Date: 6 October 2014
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Adrian Moore (Oxford) – Being, Univocity and Logical Syntax

As the first talk for the 2014/15 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Adrian Moore, University of Oxford, as the 107th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Please visit our Council page for further information regarding the Society’s past presidents.

The 107th Presidential Address will be chaired by David Papineau (KCL) – 106th President of the Aristotelian Society.

Adrian Moore is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is also a Tutorial Fellow at St Hugh’s College.  He was an undergraduate at Cambridge and a graduate at Oxford, where he wrote his doctorate under the supervision of Michael Dummett.  He is one of Bernard Williams’ literary executors.  His publications include The Infinite; Points of View; Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant’s Moral and Religious Philosophy; and, most recently, The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things.

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David Webb – From Mathematics to Ethics in the Work of Michel Foucault

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 2nd, 2014

 

Event Date: 2 October 2014
Room JG5002,
John Galsworthy Building,
Penrhyn Road Campus, Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University  presents:

Professor David Webb (Staffordshire University) – From Mathematics to Ethics in the Work of Michel Foucault

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Jeff Widener – Tiananmen Square and Beyond – Conflict Photography in Asia, 1987-1995

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 30th, 2014

Event Date: 30 September 2014 
Room Q169
Queen’s Building Lecture Theatre
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Department of History and the Department of Economics at Royal Holloway University of London present:

Jeff WidenerTiananmen Square and Beyond – Conflict Photography in Asia, 1987-1995

Jeff Widener is internationally renowned for his work at the Tiananmen Square protest and massacre in 1989, including the most iconic photograph of the last decades of the twentieth century: ‘The Tank Man.’ However, Jeff was the Associated Press Southeast Asia Picture Editor 1987-1995, based in Bangkok, Thailand, and Tiananmen Square was only one of many civil and armed conflicts he covered during the period.  Illustrating his lecture with his own photographs, Jeff will talk about the role and responsibilities of a photojournalist in documenting the nature and human suffering of war during his time at AP.
Jeff will also impart his own ‘Advice for Young People,’ based on his years as a photojournalist, as part of his talk.

Talk:

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The following day Jeff Widener was available for a longer Q&A session, where he at first talked about his childhood:

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then answered more questions from the audience:

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Photos from the event:

 

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