Michael Loewe – Problems of Han Administration

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 23rd, 2016

Event Date: 23 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

BOOK LAUNCH

Professor Michael Loewe (Cambridge) – Problems of Han Administration

Michael Loewe calls on literary and material evidence to examine three problems that arose in administering China’s early empires. Religious rites due to an emperor’s predecessors must both pay the correct services to his ancestors and demonstrate his right to succeed to the throne. In practical terms, tax collectors, merchants, farmers and townsmen required the establishment of a standard set of weights and measures that was universally operative and which they could trust. Those who saw reason to criticise the decisions taken by the emperor and his immediate advisors, whether on grounds of moral principles or political expediency, needed opportunities and the means of expressing their views, whether as remonstrants to the throne, by withdrawal from public life or as authors of private writings.

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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Placeless People: What can History tell us about today’s Refugee Crises?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 20th, 2016

Event Date: 20 June 2016
Council Room
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism  in association with the University of East Anglia presents:

Placeless People: What can History tell us about today’s Refugee Crises?

The aim of the workshop is to bring together experts in a range of fields – leading historians and scholars, policy makers, representatives from local government, NGOs, think tanks, advocacy groups and the media, to explore how history, in its broadest political, cultural and social senses, can usefully be employed to inform our understanding of the current refugee crisis and help shape our responses to it.

The workshop will address the following questions among others: are there connections between refugee crises in the past and the present? What lessons can be drawn? What kind of historical accounts do NGO’s and policy makers need to make their cases?  How might the recasting of refugee stories on a bigger historical canvas re-shape perception? And, most pressingly, how should policy and responses to the future be shaped by grasping that mass displacement may become the norm?

Programme:

Lyndsey Stonebridge and Becky Taylor (University of East Anglia) – Welcome and Introduction

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 Panel One: Refugees Now – Representations and Perspectives

This session will ask those working with refugees and communities affected by current refugee crises to talk about the problems of the current terms of media and political debates.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Ben Gidley (Birkbeck, University of London)

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Omar Khan (Runnymede Trust)

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Daniel Trilling (journalist, editor and author)

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (Refuge in a Moving World Network, University College London)

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Panel Two: Lessons from History

This session will see historians exploring the different lessons we might draw from histories and the benefits and pitfalls of drawing on historical examples to understand today’s situation.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Becky Taylor (University of East Anglia)

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Simon Behrman (University of East Anglia)

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Jessica Reinisch (Birkbeck, University of London)

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Peter Gatrell (University of Manchester)

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Tony Kushner  (University of Southampton)

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Panel Three: Making History Now

This session will explore different ways in which people have been challenging mainstream representations of refugees, and how the voices of refugees themselves might be heard in public discourse and debates.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of East Anglia

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Yousif Qasmiyeh (poet and writer)

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Colin Yeo (immigration barrister and blogger, Garden Court Chambers Representatives of Freed Voices from Detention Action)

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Amir and Fred (Free Voices)

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Agnes Woolley (Royal Holloway, University of London)

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Dorothea Debus – Shaping Our Mental Lives

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 20th, 2016

Event Date: 20 June 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Dorothea Debus (York) – Shaping Our Mental Lives

Dorothea Debus teaches Philosophy at the University of York. Her main areas of research lie in the Philosophy of Mind and Psychology. She has written on philosophical questions relating to the phenomena of memory, the imagination, attention, and the emotions, and more recently she has started work on a new research project which investigates our active involvement with our own mental lives. The paper presented here will offer some of this new material for discussion.

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Researching Gendered Inclusion: Interdisciplinary Methodologies

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 17th, 2016

Event Date: 17 June 2016

Wivenhoe House Hotel
Wivenhoe Park,
Colchester CO4 3SQ

Middlesex University Business School, Middlesex University presents:

Gendered Inclusion in Contemporary Organisations

Seminar 3 – Researching Gendered Inclusion: Interdisciplinary Methodologies

This seminar series seeks to advance debates on gender workplace inequality by proposing a shift from exclusion to inclusion in theorising gender-related issues in contemporary organisations. To challenge the recent rise of postfeminist assertions that gender equality has been achieved and women just need to ‘lean in’ to be successful, this seminar series aims to critically explore the conditions, forms and circumstances of women’s and men’s inclusion in organisations in order to generate a more complex account of contemporary experiences of workplace (in)equalities.

To advance debates concerned with the persistence of gender inequality in contemporary organizations, this seminar series argues for a shift in how we theorise and understand the tenacity and experience of ongoing discrimination. Specifically, the series calls for a move away from explanations based on an assumption of exclusion (underpinned materially and symbolically by a masculine norm) towards a focus on the way in which women and men are included in organizations today.
The inclusion of women in the world of work appears to be an inherently ‘good’ project. The current extent to which women participate in the labour market is the result of many years of struggle to create the conditions for reducing gender inequality and deserves recognition.
For academic researchers, this success also poses challenges. How can academics question prevalent patterns of inclusion? How can we enter into a productive dialogue with practitioners and policymakers about the need to critically appraise and change the ways women and men are included within contemporary organisations?
This seminar provides a forum for creative engagement with a range of innovative, interdisciplinary research methodologies aiming to explore the gendered nature of inclusion.
It encourages us to reflect on our responsibilities as academics – and possibly powerful change agents – to infuse the potential for a critical approach to issues of workplace diversity and inclusion in our research and in our contacts with different organisational stakeholders.

The seminar series is organised by Dr Maria Adamson (Middlesex University), Professor Elisabeth Kelan (Cranfield University School of Management), Dr Patricia Lewis (University of Kent), Professor Nick Rumens (University of Portsmouth), and Professor Martyna Śliwa (Essex Business School).

Programme:

Professor Martyna Śliwa (Essex Business School) -  Introduction

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Professor Melissa Tyler (Essex Business School, University of Essex) – Rethinking Methodologies of Gender Inclusion

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Professor Emma Bell (Keele Management School, Keele University) – Analysing Gendered Representations in Popular Culture

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Louise Nash (Essex Business School, University of Essex) – (Male) Members Only: Place, Performativity and Position in the Powerhouse

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Dr Suvi Salmenniemi (Department of Sociology, University of Turku) – Ethnographic Encounters: Gender, Politics and Therapeutic Technologies

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Jerry Brotton – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 16th, 2016

Event Date: 16 June 2016

Royal Geographical Society
Education Centre/Main Hall
1 Kensington Gore,
London SW7 2AR

 The Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities presents:

The Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities

Professor Jerry Brotton (QMUL) – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

This event celebrated the launch of the new Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities with the inauguration of a new lecture series, the Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities. The Centre is a major interdisciplinary initiative cultivating links between arts and humanities scholars and practitioners, geographers and the creative, cultural and heritage sectors. It focuses in particular on five cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes:
•       The Environmental GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities scholarship on environment, nature and environmental change;
•       The Creative GeoHumanities, encompassing practice-based arts research engaging themes of place, space, landscape and environment;
•       The Spatial GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities research on imaginative geographies and the production of space, past and present;
•       The Digital GeoHumanities, including the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), geo-coded data and digital mapping within arts and humanities scholarship;
•       The Public GeoHumanities, encompassing the place-based and spatial understandings of the cultural, creative and heritage sectors as well as community and participatory work.

The Denis Cosgrove lecture series will be a regular part of the Centre’s programming. The inaugural lecture was given by Professor Jerry Brotton, School of English and Drama, QMUL. Professor Philip Crang and Dr Harriet Hawkins, Co-Directors of the Centre, introduced the event. Professor Stephen Daniels, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, offered the response.

Welcome by Professor Phil Crang  (RHUL):

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Introduction by Dr Harriet Hawkins (RHUL):

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Lecture:

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Response by Professor Stephen Daniels (Nottingham):

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Sexual Difference and the Symbolic: What Future?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 14th, 2016


Event Date: 14 June 2016

Room B04
43 Gordon Sq.
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Sexual Difference and the Symbolic: What Future?

Speakers: Catherine Malabou (Kingston University) and Jacqueline Rose (Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities)

In psychoanalytic thinking, the symbolic is meant to secure the order of the world and of the mind. It is through the symbolic that sexual difference lays down its law. In this conversation, Catherine Malabou and Jacqueline Rose, both of whose writings have consistently engaged with this terrain, will discuss whether this model is still viable in modern times. Drawing on their shared and distinct research interests – from neuroscience to literary writing, from Kant to Melanie Klein, from plasticity to trans – they will address the question of the continuing relevance of psychoanalysis in a transforming world.

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Konrad Hirschler – Medieval Damascus: Plurality and Diversity in an Arabic Library

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 13th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

BOOK LAUNCH

Professor Konrad Hirschler (SOAS) – Medieval Damascus: Plurality and Diversity in an Arabic Library

The written text was a pervasive feature of cultural practices in the medieval Middle East. At the heart of book circulation stood libraries that experienced a rapid expansion from the twelfth century onwards. While the existence of these libraries is well known, our knowledge of their content and structure has been very limited as hardly any medieval Arabic catalogues have been preserved. This book discusses the largest and earliest medieval library of the Middle East for which we have documentation – the Ashrafiya library in the very centre of Damascus – and edits its catalogue. The catalogue shows that even book collections attached to Sunni religious institutions could hold very diverse titles, including Mu’tazilite theology, Shi’ite prayers, medical handbooks, manuals for traders, stories from the 1001 Nights, and texts extolling wine consumption. At the same time this library catalogue decisively expands our knowledge of how books were thematically and spatially organised on the shelves of such a large medieval library. Listing over two thousand books the Ashrafiya catalogue is essential reading for anybody interested in the cultural and intellectual history of Arabic societies. Setting it into a comparative perspective with contemporaneous libraries on the British Isles opens new perspectives for the study of medieval libraries.

Welcome by Dr Alison Otha (Director, RAS):

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David Anderson – Terrorism and Tolerance

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 13th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016

Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The 2016 Magna Carta Lecture

David Anderson QC (Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation) - Terrorism and Tolerance: UK’s independent ‘terror watchdog’ asks how we reconcile traditional freedoms with prevention of terrorism

In Terrorism and Tolerance, David Anderson will ask to what extent international law can help us to reconcile free society with the prevention of extremism. Under real threat of terrorism, both chronic and acute, the UK’s multi-pronged response has been influential and in many respects successful.  But a controversial element of that response has been the Prevent strategy, recently extended beyond the field of terrorism by the Government’s counter-extremism strategy of October 2015.
David Anderson says: ‘Key to the battle for hearts and minds is toleration: but policies based on that principle will forfeit public support if tolerance is extended too far or in the wrong directions.  My lecture will explore the capacity of international human rights law as a practical framework for deciding what must be tolerated and what must not’.
In 2011 David Anderson was appointed by the Home Secretary to be the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, a part-time role which he combines with his practice commitments.  His report A Question of Trust bore fruit in the Investigatory Powers Bill 2015.  He was named by The Times in 2012 as one of the UK’s 100 most influential lawyers and chosen as Legal Personality of the Year by the judges of the Halsbury Legal Awards 2015.

The annual Magna Carta Lectures extend the legacy of the Magna Carta and the tradition of protest, liberty and the rule of law it has inspired since 1215, when the great charter was sealed at Runnymede, close to Royal Holloway’s campus.

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Clive Scott – Imagining a Philosophy of Literary Translation

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 13th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016
ALT1
Arts Building
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

 

The School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Royal Holloway, University of London presents:

Keynote Lecture at the 2016 Postgraduate Colloquium

Professor Clive Scott (Professor Emeritus, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing University of East Anglia) – Imagining a Philosophy of Literary Translation

We too often ask of a literary translation what account it gives of an author or a work, without further asking what it contributes to translation itself. But if translation is not an occasional specialist service, but a mode of writing our reading of a foreign, or indeed a native, text, that is, potentially a mode of writing in which we all might participate, then we need urgently to know what kind of knowledge we invest in it and derive from it, how it affects our being-in-the-world, how it relates us to our environment. For these reasons, literary translation deserves a philosophy. But despite our absorbing the thinking of philosophers on translation – for example, Schleiermacher, Benjamin, Derrida – we have done relatively little to examine translation as a mechanism of consciousness, or of perception, or of linguistic experience. In beginning to nibble at this particular challenge, this lecture looks at translation in relation to time, situation and sense, to try to grasp how it redistributes categories, brings to visibility what is hidden in a text and re-organizes expressive energies as an experiment in the renewal of articulacy.

Introduction by Professor Eric Robertson (RHUL):

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Sarah Ansari – India at War: the Bombay Presidency’s ‘Home Front’, 1914-1918

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 9th, 2016

Event Date: 9 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor Sarah Ansari (Royal Holloway) – India at War: the Bombay Presidency’s ‘Home Front’, 1914-1918

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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