Mein Kampf Today: Ideology, Memory and the Question of Censorship – Panel Discussion

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 1st, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 1 December 2016
Chancellor’s Hall
Senate House
University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HU

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism in partnership with the Leo Baeck Institute London presents:

Mein Kampf Today: Ideology, Memory and the Question of Censorship – Panel Discussion

In Germany, until this year, it was illegal to print copies of Adolf Hitler’s Mein Kampf. The State of Bavaria held the copyright and banned publication of the book. In January 2016 the copyright expired and the Institute for Contemporary History in Munich published a scholarly edition which runs to two enormous volumes, complete with a lengthy introduction and copious annotation. The first print run was sold out before the publication date. In the UK, by contrast, Nazi literature is freely available and, unlike in Germany and Austria, there is no law against Holocaust denial. These events and the disparity between German and UK practice raise significant and intriguing questions. Does it make sense to ban Nazi literature in Germany today? Why was the annotated edition produced? Who in actuality are the readers? In the UK, should we regard Nazi effusions as an irritant that arises from invaluable freedoms or as an abuse that should be stopped?

Panel discussion chaired by David Feldman, Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London, and Daniel Wildmann, Director, Leo Baeck Institute, Queen Mary, University of London.

About the speakers:

David Aaronovitch is a columnist and broadcaster; he writes for The Times and Jewish Chronicle, presents BBC Radio 4’s news programme, The Briefing Room, and has written on the role of conspiracy theories in shaping modern history. Neil Gregor is a Professor of Modern European History, he has written extensively on twentieth century German history and the history of the Third Reich and recently (in German) on Mein Kampf : ‘”Mein Kampf” lesen, 70 Jahre später’. Maiken Umbach is a Professor of Modern History and an expert on National Socialism, in particular its emotional and personal history, and on amateur photography in the Third Reich.

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Catherine Malabou – Spinoza and Symbolic Necessity

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 1st, 2016

 

Event Date: 1 December 2016

Chelsea Lecture Theatre
University of the Arts London
John Islip Street
London, SW1P 4JU

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Catherine Malabou (Kingston) – Spinoza and Symbolic Necessity

In Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze contrasts philosophy and revelation. Expressionism is the privileged modality of immanence and intelligibility, opposed to ‘knowledge by signs’ that characterizes the domain of revelation and is supposedly meant to foster faith in ignorant people. The ontological dimension of revelation – that is, its necessity – is dismissed by Deleuze’s reading. Emmanuel Lévinas, following an apparently inverted logic, reproaches Spinoza for having subjected revelation to an overly rigid ontological necessity, thus missing its ‘signifying’ value. Do we find too many or too few signs in Spinoza?  By focusing on Spinoza’s method of interpretation, Catherine will challenge these approaches, showing how the issue of the symbolic inscribes itself in Spinoza’s project, and offering her own account of the symbolic.

Introduction by Dr Sheena Calvert (UAL):

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Charles Forsdick – Exoticism as Keyword

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 30th, 2016

Event Date: 30 November 2016

Gowar & Wedderburn Common Room

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Professor Charles Forsdick (James Barrow Professor of French and AHRC Theme Leadership Fellow for Translating Cultures, University of Liverpool) – Exoticism as Keyword

Professor Charles Forsdick, James Barrow Professor of French and AHRC Theme Leadership Fellow for Translating Cultures, University of Liverpool, ‘Exoticism as Keyword’
Although absent from Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976) and also from the revised version of the text, New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society (2005), exoticism seems to lend itself to the approach proposed by Raymond Williams: i.e., the term may be seen to exemplify the understanding of the ‘keyword’ as part of ‘a vocabulary to use, to ?nd our ways in, to change as we ?nd it necessary to change it, as we go on making our own language and history’. Central to such an approach is an awareness of the (un)translatability of exoticism, the meanings of which in an Anglophone context are very different from those in the French-speaking world. Engaging initially with the emergence and evolution of the concept of exotisme in the work of Victor Segalen, the paper will consider the term as a ‘keyword’ that has evolved across the twentieth century and, despite the ideological and theoretical challenges to which it has been subject, persisted into the twenty-first. I will explore the understandings of Segalenian exoticism that have emerged from the selected fragments of the Essai sur l’exotisme currently available in a published form, and track the ways in which these have formed the basis of dialogues with a range of key thinkers and writers including Jean Baudrillard, Patrick Chamoiseau, James Clifford and, perhaps most significantly, Edouard Glissant. The paper concludes with a reflection on the status of exoticism as a concept in a postcolonial frame, and explores its persistence in a number of recent studies across a range of disciplinary fields.

Introduction by Professor Daniela Berghahn (RHUL):

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Response by Professor James Williams (RHUL):

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James Baldwin – Islamic Law and Empire in Ottoman Cairo

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 29th, 2016

Event Date: 29 November 2016

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2016/2017

Dr James Baldwin (RHUL) – Islamic Law and Empire in Ottoman Cairo

Islamic law is often portrayed as the quintessential jurists’ law, developed through an intellectual conversation between scholars, outside the purview of rulers and states. However, for the Ottoman Sultans, justice was the ultimate duty of the king, and Islamic law was a tool of legitimation and governance. My talk will explore the interplay between these two conceptions of Islamic law – religious scholarship and royal justice – in the context of the legal system of Cairo, the largest and richest city in the Ottoman provinces. I will also offer some thoughts on the significance of this debate for our understanding of the long-term trajectory of Islamic legal history and for contemporary Muslim politics.

Introduction by Professor Humayun Ansari (RHUL):

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James Studd – Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 28th, 2016

Event Date: 28 November 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr James Studd (Oxford) – Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox

James Studd is the University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor at Lady Margaret Hall. In addition to the philosophy of mathematics, he works on the philosophy of logic, with occasional forays into the philosophy of language and metaphysics. He is currently writing a book about absolute generality (forthcoming with OUP).

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Brian Klug – Denouncing Israel: Anti-colonialism or Antisemitism on the British Left?

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 24th, 2016

Event Date: 24 November 2015
German Historical Institute
17 Bloomsbury Square,
London WC1A 2NJ

European Leo Baeck Institute Lecture Series 2016-17

The Legacy of the Left and Israel: 1967-2017

A lecture series organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London, in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London.

This season´s topic intends to discuss the complicated and multi-layered relationship of the European Left with Zionism and the State of Israel. We will examine this broad subject from a historical perspective and will shed light on the different debates in various European countries.

Lecture 1:

Dr Brian Klug (Oxford) – Denouncing Israel: Anti-colonialism or Antisemitism on the British Left?

A significant part of the British left, especially since the June 1967 war, tends to denounce Israel as a state and Zionism as an idea. Ostensibly, these attitudes are grounded in the anti-colonialism and anti-racism which have been staple causes for the British left since the sun began to set on the Empire. These grounds, however, are called into question by those who detect the hidden hand of antisemitism at work. The lecture will examine key concepts and arguments in this controversy, seeking to bring the issues into sharper focus.

Brian Klug is Senior Research Fellow in Philosophy at St. Benet’s Hall, Oxford, a member of the faculty of philosophy at the University of Oxford, and Honorary Fellow of the Parkes Institute for the Study of Jewish/non-Jewish Relations, University of Southampton. His most recent books are Words of Fire: Selected Essays of Ahad Ha’am (2015),Being Jewish and Doing Justice (2011) and Offence: The Jewish Case (2009).

Welcome by Dr Michael Schaich (Deputy Director, GHIL):

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Introduction by Dr Daniel Wildmann (Director, LBI):

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Asher Kaboth – Catching ghost particles

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 23rd, 2016


Event Date: 23 November 2016

Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway
University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0E

The Department of Physics at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Catching ghost particles

Dr Asher Kaboth (RHUL) - Catching ghost particles

Every day as we go through our lives, rush to work or enjoy the sun, we are unaware of trillions tiny particles passing through our bodies every single second – and by the time we stop to think about them, they have passed all the way through the earth, traveling near the speed of light. These mysterious particles are called neutrinos, also known as ghost particles, because they cannot be easily detected. Scientists build detectors as large as a cubic kilometre in order to “see” just a few of them.

Their role in unravelling the mysteries of the Universe is crucial, as they are offering us an alternative source of information, from places that light cannot reach. Exciting research has been taking place for the last 20 years and has been recently rewarded with the 2015 Nobel Prize.

Join Dr Asher Kaboth, Royal Holloway Physicist, to a journey of neutrino discovery, full of twists and unexpected results! Why are neutrinos challenging our current understanding of nature? Where do they come from and how can we find them?

For further information please contact: physics.outreach@rhul.ac.uk

Introduction by Anna Christodoulou (SEPnet/Ogden Trust Outreach Officer) and Professor Pedro Teixeira-Dias (HoD Physics, RHUL):

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Nikolas Kompridis – Agency: Human and Non-Human

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2016


Event Date: 22 November 2016

Room 101
30 Russell Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1B 5DQ

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Professor Nikolas Kompridis (Institute of Social Justice)  – Agency: Human and Non-Human

Recent discussions of non-human agency – the agency of “things” or of “actants” – have challenged the putative differences between human and non-human agency. But an insufficiently questioned picture of human agency continues to undermine attempts to make sense of non-human agency, and to think anew the relation between human and non-human agency, a task which has become all the more urgent as we come to grips with the Anthropocene.  In this paper, Professor Kompridis proposes an alternative conception of agency that better captures what is distinctive to both human and non-human agency.

Nikolas Kompridis is Research Professor in Philosophy and Political Thought and Director of the Institute for Social Justice. He is the author of The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (Bloomsbury, 2014) Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future (MIT, 2006), Philosophical Romanticism (Routledge, 2006), and over 50 articles on a very broad spectrum of topics in philosophy and political theory.

Originally trained as a musician (the University of Toronto and Yale University), he was the founder and director of the Canadian new music ensemble, Sound Pressure, during which time he worked with some of the world’s leading composers – Frederic Rzewski, Martin Bresnick, Louis Andriessen, and David Lang, among others. After a decade long-career in music he was drawn into an academic career, inspired by the Critical Theory tradition, which eventually took him to Frankfurt, where he worked with Jürgen Habermas as a postdoctoral fellow in the philosophy department at J.W. Goethe University. Drawing on the traditions of Critical Theory, Political Theory, Philosophical Romanticism, and American Pragmatism, his work has been concerned with rethinking the meaning of reason, critique, normativity, and agency from the perspective of his conceptions of “reflective disclosure” and “receptivity” (in Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future, and other writings). This larger project also involves rethinking democratic practices of collective self-reflection and democratic practices of institutional and cultural change.

He is currently completing two new books, Critique and Receptivity, and, Romanticism, Skepticism, and Philosophy. Among his future projects is an ambitious rethinking of what it means to be human in the age of the Anthropocene, beyond the limitations of both humanism and posthumanism. Other projects include a book on the philosophy of music (after Adorno) and a book on the filmmaker, Jean-Luc Godard.

Chair: Professor Jacqueline Rose (Birkbeck)

Introduction:

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Drucilla Cornell – The Spirit of Revolution: Beyond the Dead Ends of Man

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 18th, 2016


Event Date: 18 November 2016

Room B13
43 Gordon Square
School of Arts
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the Birkbeck School of Law present:

Professor Drucilla Cornell (Rutgers) – The Spirit of Revolution: Beyond the Dead Ends of Man

In recent years, some theorists have effectively disavowed both ‘the human’ and revolutionary politics. In the face of massive geopolitical crisis, post humanists have called for us to reconsider the superiority and centrality of humankind and the human, and question how Man can presume to change the world by revolutionary action, particularly when such hopes and dreams seem to have been swept into the dustbin of history. Professor Cornell seeks to provoke us to reaffirm agency and the struggle against colonialism and capitalism through a series of creolised readings: Foucault with Ali Shari’ati, Lacan with Fanon, and Spinoza with Sylvia Winter. Can ‘political spirituality’ have a place in the current debates between humanism and post-humanism?

Introduction by Dr Oscar Guardiola-Rivera (Birkbeck):

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A World in Crisis: Climate Change, Violence, Demography and the Global Economy

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 17th, 2016

Event Date: 17 November 2016
Drayton B20 Jevons Lecture Theatre
Drayton House
University College London
30 Gordon St
London WC1H 0AX

The Department of Politics at Birkbeck University of London presents:

A World in Crisis: Climate Change, Violence, Demography and the Global Economy

Staff Debate with Alex Colas, Aideen Foley, Ali Guven, and Eric Kaufmann

The ongoing political turmoil in Brazil and Turkey is symptomatic of local and regional crises within and around many of the emerging powers in the Global South. With no clear end to the wars in the greater Middle East, and unequal and uneven development still prevalent across many parts of Africa, Asia and Latin America, the world seems to be facing a period of continuous uncertainty. If we add to this the intractable crisis of climate change and the predicted population growth of our planet to 11 billion by the end of the century, a sense of impending doom appears hard to avoid. A panel of Politics faculty, joined by our Geography colleague Aideen Foley, will address these and related issues through the prisms of  international security, political economy, environmental politics and political demography. Drawing one their teaching and research expertise in these areas, they will analyse the dynamics and extent of these various crises, and debate the prospects of a more optimistic future.

Chair: Deborah Mabbett (Birkbeck)

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