Joyce Gould – Politics and Public Health: HIV 30 Years on

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 28th, 2014

Event Date: 3 December 2013cumberland-lodge_v1
Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP

 

Cumberland Lodge (Health and Society series) presents:

The 3rd Windsor Ethics Lecture

Baroness Gould of Potternewton - Politics and Public Health: HIV 30 Years on

Baroness Gould became a life peer in 1993 and was a Deputy Speaker from 2002 to 2012. Until 2010 she was Chair of the Government’s Independent Advisory Group for Sexual Health and HIV.  She is currently the co-Chair of the Sexual Health Forum, Chair of the All Party Parliamentary for Sexual and Reproductive Health in the UK, and patron of Yorkshire Mesmac, Sussex Beacon and HIV Sport.  Baroness Gould is an Honorary Fellow of the Faculty of Sexual and Reproductive Healthcare; an Honorary Fellow of the British Association for Sexual Health and HIV [BASHH].  In 1997 Baroness Gould was awarded an Honorary Doctorate of the University by Bradford University and from the University of Birmingham City University in 2009, and Greenwich University in 2012.

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The Windsor Ethics Lectures are a collaboration between Cumberland Lodge, and St George’s House Windsor.

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Cumberland Lodge is the home of an educational charity, founded in 1947 to promote ethical discussion and cross-disciplinary collaboration

Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP
Tel: 01784 432 316.
Registered charity: 1108677

Website: www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk

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Malcolm Grant – The Technological Revolution in Healthcare: Capturing the Benefits for the NHS

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 25th, 2014

Event Date: 29 May 2014cumberland-lodge_v1
Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP

 

Cumberland Lodge (Health and Society series) presents:

Professor Sir Malcolm Grant CBEThe Technological Revolution in Healthcare: Capturing the Benefits for the NHS

Sir Malcolm is Chairman of NHS England, and is also a trained barrister and academic lawyer. From 2003-2013 he was the President and Provost of University College London. He has served as Chair of the Local Government Commission for England, of the Agriculture and Environmental Biotechnology Commission and the Russell Group of universities. He is currently a board member of the Higher Education Funding Council for England and of the University Grants Committee of Hong Kong; and he serves as a UK Business Ambassador. He received a CBE in 2013 for services to higher education.
Sir Malcolm’s lecture focuses on his work with the National Health Service.

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Cumberland Lodge is the home of an educational charity, founded in 1947 to promote ethical discussion and cross-disciplinary collaboration

Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP
Tel: 01784 432 316.
Registered charity: 1108677

Website: www.cumberlandlodge.ac.uk

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London Critical Theory Summer School 2014 – Friday Debate II

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 18th, 2014


Event Date: 18 July 2014

Room B33
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

London Critical Theory Summer School 2014 – Friday Debate II

An invitation to come along and listen to a discussion and debate with academics teaching on the second week of the London Critical Theory Summer School.

Speakers: David Harvey, Stephen FroshEsther Leslie & Slavoj Zizek

Chair: Costas Douzinas

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London Critical Theory Summer School 2014 – Friday Debate I

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 11th, 2014


Event Date: 11 July 2014

Room B33
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

London Critical Theory Summer School 2014 – Friday Debate I

An invitation to come along and listen to a discussion and debate with academics teaching on the first week of the London Critical Theory Summer School.

Speakers: Etienne Balibar, Drucilla Cornell , Costas Douzinas & Jacqueline Rose

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Jay Winter – The Great War and Jewish Memory

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 3rd, 2014

Event Date: 3 July 2014
German Historical Institute
17 Bloomsbury Square,
London WC1A 2NJ

A lecture series organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London, the Jewish Museum and the Fritz Bauer Institut, Frankfurt/Main, in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London.

Professor Jay Winter (Yale) – The Great War and Jewish Memory

The Great War shattered Yosef Hayim Yerushalmi’s celebrated distinction between history and memory in Jewish cultural life.  Jay Winter argues that Jewish history and Jewish memory collided between 1914 and 1918 in ways which transformed both and created a new category he terms ‘historical remembrance’.

The war unleashed both, centripetal forces, moving Jews to the core of their societies and centrifugal forces, dispersing huge populations of Jews in Eastern Europe and Russia, creating terrifying violence, the appearance of which was a precondition for the Holocaust 25 years later.

Jay Winter is the Charles J. Stille Professor of History at Yale University. His latest monograph René Cassin and the Rights of Man. From the Great War to the Universal Declaration was published in 2013. He is editor-in-chief of the three-volume Cambridge History of the First World War (2014) and a founder of the Historial de la grande guerre at Péronne, Somme, France.

Welcome by Dr Felix Roemer (GHIL):

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Introduction by Dr Daniel Wildmann (LBI):

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Lecture:

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accompanying images:

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Histories of Prejudice: Persecuting Others

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 3rd, 2014

Event Date: 3 July 2014
Room B20
Birkbeck Main Building,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet St
London, WC1E 7HX

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism in partnership with the Department of History, Classics and Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London and the Raphael Samuel History Centre presents:

Histories of Prejudice: Persecuting Others

This round-table discussion considers the histories, connections and disconnections between groups and peoples which mainstream society frequently classes as ‘outsiders’. Taking Becky Taylor’s new book Another Darkness, Another Dawn, A History of Gypsies, Roma and Travellers as its starting point, speakers will explore the experiences and prejudices that have shaped the lives of marginalised groups in twentieth century Europe including Roma, Jews, refugees and homosexuals.

Through a wide-ranging discussion they will explore societies’ omnivorous appetites for prejudice, the different kinds of prejudice that have existed over time and ask, why is opposition to prejudice so selective?

Becky Taylor is a Wellcome Research Fellow at the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, her research centres on the relationship between the state and minorities and discourses of inclusion on marginal groups.
Matt Cook is a cultural historian specializing in the history of sexuality and the history of London in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries.
Jessica Reinisch focuses on the migration and displacement of populations in post-war Europe and issues of nationalism, ethnicity and race.

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Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Pears Institute, Birkbeck):

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Dr Becky Taylor (Pears Institute):

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Dr Matt Cook (Birkbeck):

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Dr Jessica Reinisch (Birkbeck):

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New Zealand in the First World War

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on July 3rd, 2014

 

 

Event Date: 3 – 4 July 2014
Room B18,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street,
London, WC1E 7HX

The New Zealand Studies Network presents:

New Zealand in the First World War

Over 100,000 troops and nurses served in World War One from a New Zealand population of just over one million people.  With one of the highest casualty rates per capita of any nation involved, the impacts on New Zealand were considerable.  But what was a war fought on the other side of the world and in service to Empire really about? The debates about the meaning of this most deadly of wars continue.  Book your place now to hear a unique group of speakers who will consider World War One’s enduring legacy for New Zealand, taking as their themes a broader, cultural perspective and looking at the years leading to war, the war years themselves and the long aftermath.

A selection of papers have been recorded and are available here:

Welcome by Professor  Rod Edmond (Kent):

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Opening of conference by  Rob Taylor (NZ Deputy High Commissioner):

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Introduction to keynote lecture by Anna Davin:

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Keynote Lecture: Professor Charlotte Macdonald (Wellington)- World War One and the Making of Colonial Memory:

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Audience Questions:

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Murray EdmondWhatiwhati taku pene: Three First World War Poems from The Penguin Book of New Zealand Verse (1985):

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Harry RickettsDonald H Lea and Alfred Clark: Two New Zealand First World War Poets:

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Panel Questions:

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James Belich – Better Britons? NZ, Britain and World War One

in Academic Service - Archive by on July 2nd, 2014

 

 

Event Date: 2 July 2014
Room 541,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street,
London, WC1E 7HX

The New Zealand Studies Network presents:

Professor  James Belich (Oxford) – Better Britons? NZ, Britain and World War One

This lecture considers the effects on each other of New Zealand collective identities and the Great War. Was the shift in the New Zealand self-image during and after the war Anzac, nationalist, or ‘Better British’? The lecture also sets the issue of settler colonial identities in a wider comparative context.

James Belich completed his doctorate at Nuffield College, Oxford, while on a Rhodes Scholarship, then worked as a historian and university lecturer in New Zealand. He held the Inaugural Keith Sinclair Chair in History at the University of Auckland and then became Research Professor of History at the Stout Research Centre, Victoria University of Wellington. He has held visiting positions at the Universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Georgetown, and Melbourne. His books include a two-volume history of New Zealand, Making Peoples and Paradise Reforged, and The New Zealand Wars and the Victorian Interpretation of Racial Conflict, which was later made into a television documentary series. His latest book is Replenishing the Earth: The Settler Revolution and the Rise of the Anglo-world, 1783 -1939 (2009). Since 2011, he has been Beit Professor of Commonwealth and Imperial History at Oxford University and Director of the Oxford Centre for Global History. He is currently working on the causes of early European expansion.

Introduction by Professor Rod Edmond (Kent):

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The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times – Discussing the Issues

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 30th, 2014

Event Date: 30 June 2014
Room 421
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute of Social Research, Birkbeck, University of London presents:

“The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times” – Discussing the Issues

Speakers: Barbara Taylor, with David Bell, Stephen Frosh, Rex Haigh and Lynne Segal
Chaired by Sasha Roseneil

At this seminar, Barbara Taylor will speak about her recently published book “The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times” (2014, Penguin), in dialogue with David Bell, Stephen Frosh, Rex Haigh and Lynne Segal. Taylor’s book raises many important issues about the personal experience of mental illness, and how this might be described and spoken about publicly, about the changing nature of psychiatric and mental health services, and about the role of psychoanalysis, community and friendship in surviving “madness”.

Barbara Taylor is Professor of Humanities at Queen Mary, University of London.

David Bell is a psychoanalyst and Consultant Psychiatrist at the Tavistock Clinic, and Past President of the British Psychoanalytic Society.

Stephen Frosh is Professor of Psychology and Pro-Vice Master at Birkbeck, University of London.

Rex Haigh is a psychiatrist and group analyst who has played a major role in the development of therapeutic communities in the UK.

Lynne Segal is Anniversary Professor of Psychology and Gender Studies, Birkbeck University of London.

Sasha Roseneil is Professor of Sociology and Social Theory and Director of the Birkbeck Institute for Social Research at Birkbeck, and a group analyst.

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Introduction by Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck):

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Barbara Taylor (QMUL):

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Stephen Frosh (Birkbeck):

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Lynne Segal (Birkbeck):

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Rex Haigh:

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David Bell (Tavistock):

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Audience Questions:

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Debating Antisemitism: Why do Jews Disagree so Much?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 26th, 2014

Event Date: 26 June 2014
Room B33
Birkbeck Main Building,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet St
London, WC1E 7HX

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism presents:

Debating Antisemitism: Why do Jews Disagree so Much?

Speakers:  Diana Pinto, intellectual historian and author; Keith Kahn-Harris, writer and sociologist; David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

In this round-table discussion, Diana Pinto, intellectual historian and author who has written widely on Jewish identity in Europe, and Keith Kahn-Harris, writer and sociologist, whose recent book explores the debates over Israel among Jews in Britain, join David Feldman, Director of the Pears Institute, to explore the perennial, perplexing question – why do Jews disagree so much on the issue of antisemitism?
What are the different perspectives Jews hold on antisemitism across Europe? How do these perspectives connect to debates about Israel? How are such debates managed? Can dialogue be conducted with civility or is its descent into conflict inevitable? And how do the internal Jewish debates on antisemitism reflect wider societal debates concerned with antisemitism and racism?

Diana Pinto, who lives in Paris, is highly respected for her writing and lecturing on European Jewry and broader transatlantic issues. Her recent publications include: Israel has moved (Harvard University Press, 2013) and ‘Negotiating Jewish Identity in an Antisemtic Age’, Jewish Culture and History (2013), Vol 14, Issue 2-3. Keith Kahn-Harris, based in London, is a regular contributor toThe Guardian, Independent and  New Statesman. His most recent book, Uncivil War, The Israel Conflict in the Jewish Community (David Paul Books) was published earlier this year; he is also co-author of Turbulent Times, The British Jewish Community Today (Continuum, 2010).

David Feldman is Director of the Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism at Birkbeck, University of London.

Keith Kahn-Harris explores the relationship between Anglo-Jewry and Israel, the causes of the conflicts and the different methods, including his own innovative efforts, to counter conflict and foster dialogue within Jewish communities.
Keith Kahn-Harris, Uncivil War, The Israel Conflict in the Jewish Community, David Paul Books, 2014

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Birkbeck):

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Keith Kahn-Harris:

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Diana Pinto:

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