Paul Raffield – Shakespeare, Common Law, and the idyll of Albion: Laws and lawyers in Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 10th, 2014

                                                       

Event Date: 27 February 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

 The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Paul Raffield (Warwick) – Shakespeare, Common Law, and the idyll of Albion: Laws and lawyers in Henry IV, Parts 1 and 2

Introduction by Professor Eric Heinze (QMUL):

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Engineering Professors’ Council Congress 2014 – Engaging in Engineering

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 8th, 2014

Event Date: 8 – 9 April 2014

Univerity of Glasgow
Glasgow
Scotland
G12 8QQ

 

 

The Engineering Professors’ Council presents:

Engineering Professors’ Council Congress 2014

Engaging in Engineering

Professor John Perkins’ review of the provision of engineering skills in the UK economy was published in November 2013. The review endorses the widely accepted view that substantially increasing the supply of engineers entering the labour market would benefit the UK economy. “This would help the economy to be more flexible and resilient, and enable more people to take up new opportunities that technological change presents“. www.gov.uk.

Come and hear how Professor Perkins is getting on with implementing the recommendations of the review, hear what the next generation of engineers think about it and secure your opportunity (via our workshops) to shape the outcome of the Perkins implementation project on Specialist Skills (focusing on the development and funding of postgraduate programmes) which is being led by the Engineering Professors’ Council.

The consultation on deciding the priorities for the capital funding allocation in the next Government spending round will also be live during Congress, so we’ll be holding a session which will enable us to capture the views of our community and shape our response.  So – lots of opportunities to influence a number of important issues.

In 2014, the Engineering Professors’ Council (EPC) will be celebrating 20 years since the joining together of the Engineering Professors’ Conference and the Committee for Engineering in Polytechnics in 1994. To mark the event, we’re offering some awards: an essay prize for students (in collaboration with the Incorporation of Hammermen of Glasgow) and a public engagement grant award – Engaging in Engineering –  for staff, to which students and staff of EPC member institutions are invited to enter/apply appropriately. The winners of the student essay prize will be announced at Congress and the finalists for up to two Engaging in Engineering grants will be pitching their applications to Congress delegates who will have the opportunity to vote for the winners…

Recorded programme:

Introduction by Professor  Helen Atkinson CBE FREng (Engineering Professors’ Council and University of Leicester):

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Dr Robin Mellors-Bourne (Deputy CEO, CRAC) – Improving the diversity of the engineering workforce

AUDIO HERE

Panel discussion with  Dr Robin Mellors-Bourne (Deputy CEO, CRAC), Dr David Docherty (Chief Executive, National Centre for Universities and Business), Stephen Isherwood (Association of Graduate Recruiters) and Dr Jan Peters (Katalytik):

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Distinguished Guest Lecture : Sir John Parker GBE FREng (President of the Royal Academy of  Engineering and Chair of Anglo American) – Engineering for Growth

AUDIO HERE

Keynote lecture: Professor John Perkins CBE FREng – Engineering Skills in the UK

AUDIO HERE

The first prize winner of the Engineering Professors’ Council and The Hammermen of Glasgow student essay, Laura Pickard:

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Questions and answers: Professor John Perkins and winner and runner-up from the Student Awards Laura Pickard, Julia Attwood and Eleanor Earl:

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Sexual Violence in Armed Conflicts: Film, Testimony, and the Vietnam War

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 3rd, 2014

 

Event Date: 3 April 2014
Birkbeck Cinema
43 Gordon Sq
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict (SVAC) research group and the Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities present:

Sexual Violence in Armed Conflicts: Film, Testimony, and the Vietnam War

Joanna Bourke in conversation with Kendrick Oliver about filmic testimony about rape during the war in Vietnam, with reflections on sexual violence in current conflicts followed by drinks reception. This public event opened this year’s SVAC (Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict group) Workshop entitled “Cultures of Sexual Violence in Armed Conflict”

Joanna Bourke is Professor of History at Birkbeck, University of London. She is the author of (among other books) Rape: A History from the 1860s to the Present (London: Virago, 2007)

Kendrick Oliver is Professor of American History at the University of Southampton. He is the author of (among other books), The My Lai Massacre in American History and Memory (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 2006)

Part I – Speakers: Joanna Bourke and Kirsten Campbell (Goldsmiths):

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Audio of the film clips (WARNING: The testimonies in this audio file are extremely violent and of a graphic nature.)

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Part II – Speakers: Joanna Bourke and Kendrick Oliver (Southampton)

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Roz Currie – Curating the Jewish Experience of the First World War

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 2nd, 2014

Event Date: 2 April 2014
German Historical Institute
17 Bloomsbury Square,
London WC1A 2NJ

A lecture series organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London, the Jewish Museum and the Fritz Bauer Institut, Frankfurt/Main, in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London.

Roz Currie (Jewish Military Museum, London) – Curating the Jewish Experience of the First World War

The First World War was a pivotal time of change for the Jewish community inBritainand indeed throughout Europe and theMiddle East. Roz Currie has curated the Jewish Military Museum and Jewish Museum London joint exhibition on this subject. This lecture will discuss the challenges behind telling this story, it will touch on newly uncovered narratives of those at war and also question what it meant to be a British Jew at the outbreak of war.

Roz Currie earned an MA in Japanese and Chinese archaeology at School of Oriental and African Studies. After having completed an MA in museum studies at UCL, she started at the Jewish Military Museum in January 2012 as its first professional museum curator.

Lecture:

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The Cognitive Science of Religion

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on March 28th, 2014

                                                          

Event Date: 28 March 2013
Room B36
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Department of Philosophy at Birkbeck presents:

Mind & Language Conference at Birkbeck College

The Cognitive Science of Religion

The journal Mind & Language, founded thirty years ago, has the mission of encouraging genuinely interdisciplinary work on mind and language in psychology, philosophy, linguistics and in the cognitive sciences generally. From the beginning, it has been based in the Philosophy Department of Birkbeck College.

In addition to what is published in the journal, have mounted a number of workshops and conferences. This conference – our eighteenth – deals with the challenging topic of The Cognitive Science of Religion. Calling on work in psychology, anthropology, linguistics and philosophy, our speakers explored various ways in which we might understand human cognitive propensities to what can be broadly thought of as ‘religion’, though not, it should be said, in a formally institutional sense.

Programme:

Introduction by Professor Samuel Guttenplan (Birkbeck):

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Professor Dan Sperber (Institut Jean Nicod, Paris) – Apparently Irrational Practices
Chair: Samuel Guttenplan (Birkbeck)

AUDIO HERE

Dr Helen De Cruz (Oxford) – Appealing Arguments: What the Cognitive Science of Religion Can Tell Us About Natural Theology
Chair: Gregory Currie (York)

AUDIO HERE

Professor Maurice Bloch (LSE) – How Did ‘Religion’ Come About?
Chair: Deirdre Wilson (UCL)

AUDIO HERE

Professor  Frank Keil (Yale) – Order, Order Everywhere and Not an Agent to Think: The Cognitive Compulsion to Make the Argument from Design
Chair: Margaret Harris (Oxford Brookes)

AUDIO HERE

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Janet Thornton – The Importance of Genomics and Bioinformatics for the future of Medicine and Agriculture

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 27th, 2014

Event Date: 27 March 2014

Room B01
Clore Management Centre
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Department of Biological Sciences at Birkbeck presents:

The 2014 Bernal Lecture

Professor Dame Janet ThorntonThe Importance of Genomics and Bioinformatics for the future of Medicine and Agriculture

The past twenty years have witnessed a step change in biology. The impact of genomic sequencing and other high-throughput methods has revolutionised biological research. Whereas a lab researcher would once spend weeks analysing a gene sequence using molecular biology techniques, the same work can now be done in minutes using public databases of biological information.These databases are rapidly growing resources holding our collected knowledge on the whole spectrum of life.  With the promise of whole genome sequences for 100,000 UK citizens, we are poised at the moment when this knowledge can be translated into applications with benefits for society. This lecture will present a background to the field of data-intensive biology (bioinformatics) and examine how we are taking the first steps to exploit the power of biological data for applications in medicine, healthcare and agriculture.

Introduction: Professor David Latchman, CBE, Master of Birkbeck:

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Lecture:

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Vote of thanks: Professor Gabriel Waksman FRS, Head of Department:

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Richard Overy – “No Stab in the Back!” Race, Labour and the Nationalist Socialist Regime under the Bombs, 1940-45

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 27th, 2014

 

Event Date: 27 March 2013

Room B35

Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism presents:

Professor Richard Overy (Exeter) – “No Stab in the Back!” Race, Labour and the Nationalist Socialist Regime under the Bombs, 1940-45

It is often argued that the Hitler regime was profoundly influenced by the ‘stab-in-the-back’ myth generated by the German collapse in 1918. In World War II the anxiety that the home front might collapse was fuelled by the escalating bomber offensive and the widespread popular belief that urban communities would not be able to withstand the bombing. For the regime, the urban working-class and the Jews were perceived as the greatest potential threat. Issues of race and labour came to play a major part in planning civil defence and coping with the aftermath of bomb attack. For the Allies, the German working class was also regarded as the ‘weak link’ and so working class residential districts became the principal RAF targets. A battle ensued between the two sides over the ‘morale’ of the German workforce.

Richard Overy is Professor of History at Exeter University. His research interests include the Hitler and Stalin dictatorships, the Second World War and air power in the twentieth century. He has published widely, most recently: The Bombing War: Europe 1939-1945 (Allen Lane, 2013) and the Third Reich: A Chronicle (Quercus, 2010). In 2001 Professor Overy was awarded the Samuel Elliot Morison Prize of the Society for Military History for his contribution to the history of warfare.

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Director, Pears Institute):

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John Macarthur- Kurt Schwitters and Walter Benjamin: The Modernity of the Baroque and Romanticism

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 27th, 2014

Event Date: 27 March 2014

Swedenborg Hall
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University  presents:

Professor John Macarthur (University of Queensland) – Kurt Schwitters and Walter Benjamin: The Modernity of the Baroque and Romanticism

Professor John Macarthur directs the research centre ‘Architecture.Theory.Criticism.History’ (ATCH) at the University of Queensland, Australia. His research in the history and theory of architecture has focused on the conceptual framework and the history of picturesque aesthetics. His book, The Picturesque: Architecture, Disgust and Other Irregularities, was published by Routledge in 2007. He is currently researching projects on the Baroque in the 20th century, on architectural aesthetics, and on the architecture of Queensland. He is also an active critic of contemporary architecture. He is currently Visiting Professor at the Bartlett School of Architecture, University College London.

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Claire Langhamer – The English in Love

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2014

 

Event Date: 26 March 2014

Main Lecture Theatre
Founder’s Building
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

The Bedford Centre for the History of Women at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Professor Claire Langhamer (Sussex) - The English in Love

Love has a history. It has meant different things to different people at different moments and has served different purposes. In 2014′s annual Bedford Centre Lecture, Professor Claire Langhammer suggests that something very distinctive happened to love, and to our understandings of it, in the middle years of the 20th century. Put simply, ordinary men and women began to expect a lot more from love and – because this was a period when most people sought (or felt compelled) to marry those they loved – they also expected more from marriage. Mid-century people increasingly looked for love at first sight, true love, a soulmate; they hoped to experience romance and a fulfilling sex life. Claire explores the implications of rising expectations for the way people lived their lives and looks at the unsettling questions that people faced as love triumphed over pragmatism.

Claire Langhamer is Professor of Modern British History at Sussex University where she has worked since 1998. Her research deals with the diverse ways in which ordinary people negotiated modernity in twentieth-century Britain. She is the author of Women’s Leisure in England 1920-1960 and The English in Love: The Intimate Story of an Emotional Revolution. She has also written on home, happiness, feelings about capital punishment and agony aunts.

Introduction by Dr Jane Hamlett (RHUL):

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Logic and Language 2014

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on March 21st, 2014

Event Date: 21 – 22 March 2014
Senate Room
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

CeLL – the Centre for Logic and Language, at the Institute of Philosophy presents:

Logic and Language 2014 Conference

The Logic and Language Conference is organised every other year by the Institute of Philosophy and the Northern Institute of Philosophy, in turn. The aim of the conference is to showcase cutting edge research in the Philosophy of Logic and Language, and to foster interaction between academics working in these areas both in the UK and abroad. In particular, its aim is to give an opportunity to junior philosophers to interact with more senior colleagues working in the same field.

Programme:

Friday 21 March 2014

Welcome by Corine Besson (Sussex/IP):

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Sarah Sawyer (Sussex) – Judgement, motivation and reason
Chair: Guy Longworth (Warwick)

AUDIO HERE

Rosanna Keefe (Sheffield) – Validity, Normativity and Degree of Belief
Chair: Nick Jones (Birmingham)

AUDIO HERE

2.00 – 3.30 Ephraim Glick (St Andrews) – What is a Singular Proposition?
Chair: Jonathan Payne (IP)

AUDIO HERE

4.00 – 5.30 Alex Silk (Birmingham) - Discourse Contextualism and Embedding
Chair: Dorothy Edgington (Birkbeck)

AUDIO HERE

5.30 – 7.00 Stephen Neale (CUNY/Birmingham) – The Metaphysics of Aphonics and Implicit Reference
Chair: Susanne Bobzien (All Souls College, Oxford)

AUDIO HERE

Saturday 22 March 2014

10.00 – 11.30 Crispin Wright (NIP/NYU) – Making sense of faultless disagreement: the uselessness of relativism, and how to do better
Chair: Corine Besson (Sussex/IP)

AUDIO HERE

11.30 – 1.00 James Studd (Oxford) – Abstraction reconceived
Chair: Julien Murzi (Kent)

AUDIO HERE

2.30 – 4.00 Anna Mahtani (LSE) – Deference and Designators
Chair: Daniel Rothschild (UCL)

AUDIO HERE

4.30 – 6.15 Ian Rumfitt (Birmingham) – Lecture in honour of Michael Dummett – On the Use of Classical Logic and Classical Semantics
in Set Theory
Chair: Barry Smith (IP)

AUDIO HERE

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