Jonathan Harris – Byzantine Valhalla: The Life and Death of the Church of the Holy Apostles

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 27th, 2014

Event Date: 27 October 2014

Windsor Auditorium

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History presents:

Inaugural Lecture

Professor Jonathan Harris (RHUL) – Byzantine Valhalla: The Life and Death of the Church of the Holy Apostles

The Holy Apostles was the second largest church in Byzantine Constantinople. Consecrated in 370 CE, it housed the tombs of Emperor Constantine I and his successors and stood for a thousand years until the Ottoman conquest of 1453. This lecture will reconstruct the building’s appearance and trace its role both in imperial ceremonial and the very murky world of Byzantine politics.

Introduction by Professor Katie Normington (RHUL):

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Vote of Thanks by Dr Catherine Holmes (Oxford):

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Phil Cohen – Our Kind of Town? Citizen Social Science, Participatory Mapping and the Struggle for a Just City

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 23rd, 2014

Event Date: 23 October 2014
Room B04
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, Birkbeck, University of London presents:

Professor Phil Cohen (UEL/Birkbeck) – Our Kind of Town? Citizen Social Science, Participatory Mapping and the Struggle for a Just City

The emergence of Citizen Social Science (CSS) has challenged many of the claims staked by academic sociology to possess a methodology giving unique access to social reality. But under what conditions does the active participation of citizens in social research actually improve the quality of data and its interpretation, and how far does it exercise what C. Wright Mills called the ‘sociological imagination’?
The question has been posed with special clarity by projects which make use of participatory mapping techniques to elicit, record and analyse real and imagined communities of engagement with contemporary issues of urban policy. In this lecture I will explore the tension between the desire to validate locally situated structures of feeling and knowledge, and the need to construct a space of critical reflection or ‘deconstruction’, looking at a number of historical precedents of CSS, including Mass Observation, Bill Bunge’s ‘expeditionary geography’, and various attempts to construct public ethnographies in which informants have a material stake.
The lecture concludes by drawing on some recent work by Living Maps in East London, focussed on the legacy impact of the 2012 Olympics on local communities, to consider the limits and conditions of Citizen Social Science in supporting struggles against gentrification and the privatisation of public space and amenity.

Phil Cohen is Visiting Professor in the Department of Geography, Environment and Development Studies at Birkbeck and Emeritus Professor in Cultural Studies at the University of East London, where he was the first director of the London East Research Institute. He recently co-founded Living Maps, a network of academics, artists and activists interested in the theory and practice of critical cartography.
Since the 1980s Phil has carried out ethnographic research on issues of class, race and regeneration, much of this work having a focus on East London. Prior to this, his work on youth cultures established his international reputation. More recently he carried out a five year study into the local impact of the Olympics; On the Wrong Side of the Track? East London and the Post Olympics was published in May 2013 by Lawrence & Wishart. He is currently collaborating with Paul Watt on A Hollow Legacy? London 2012 and the Post Olympics, an edited book about the longer-term Olympic legacy. He is the author of Knuckle Sandwich: Growing Up in the Working Class City (with Dave Robins); Rethinking the Youth Question; Finding the Way Home: Young People’s Narratives of Race, Place and Identity in London Docklands and Hamburg (with Nora Rathzel), and London’s Turning: The Making of Thames Gateway (with Mike Rustin). A collection of his academic work, Material Dreams: Maps and Territories in the Un/making of Modernity, is forthcoming from Palgrave Macmillan.

Introduction by Dr Paul Watt (Birkbeck):

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Catharine Abell – Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 20th, 2014

Event Date: 20 October 2014
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Catharine Abell (Manchester) – Genre, Interpretation and Evaluation

Catharine Abell is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at The University of Manchester. Her research is predominantly in aesthetics and focuses on issues concerning the representational arts. She has published papers on topics such as the nature of depiction, how representational works of art express emotions and other mental states, and what it is for something to be an artwork. Her current research addresses issues such as the nature of fiction, the interpretation of works of fiction, and what styles and genres are and their effects on the interpretation and evaluation of works of fiction and other representational artworks. Together with Joel Smith, she is also working on the AHRC- funded project, Knowledge of Emotion, about how we know the emotional states of others.

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Au Pairing After the Au Pair Scheme – ESRC Research Project Dissemination Event

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 17th, 2014

Event Date: 17 October 2014
Keynes Library
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research, Birkbeck, University of London presents:

‘Au Pairing After the Au Pair Scheme’ – ESRC Research Project Dissemination Event

A ‘perfect storm’ of long working hours, high childcare costs, the cultural devaluing of reproductive labour and the availability of a large, low-waged labour force from other EU countries, make the UK home to up to 90,000 au pairs at any one time – probably the largest number anywhere in the world.  For many British families au pairs are the only workable solution to the ‘childcare crisis’ but they are only affordable because their work is not recognised and their poor conditions are justified through discourses of cultural exchange and adventure.

In November 2008 the UK government deregulated au pairing, removing all official guidance about what an au pair could or couldn’t do and all protections for au pairs in terms of working hours, pay and living conditions.  This event reports on findings from a two-year ESRC funded research project that has been investigating the effects of this deregulation and considers the importance of au pairs to UK families.  Au pairing is a significant form of low-paid domestic labour that is depended upon by tens of thousands of households in order to balance the demands of work and family life.

The project brings together two important issues for contemporary society – women’s changing relationship to the home and paid work and the growth in labour migration.  It worked with au pairs and host families, stakeholders in the sector and collected data from 1000 advertisements for au pair posts in order to understand what au pairing is in contemporary Britain and what part it plays in the lives of au pairs.

Speakers:

Bridget Anderson (COMPAS University of Oxford)
Nicky Busch (Birkbeck)
Rosie Cox (Birkbeck)
Helle Stenum (Roskilde University, Denmark)

Programme:

Welcome by Professor Sasha Roseneil (Birkbeck):

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Introduction by Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck):

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Panel One

Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck):

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Dr Nicky Busch (Birkbeck):

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Panel Two

Dr Helle Stenum (Roskilde University, Denmark):

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Professor Bridget Anderson (COMPAS University of Oxford):

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Mary Beth Mader – Whence intensity? Deleuze and the revival of a concept

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 16th, 2014

 

Event Date: 16 October 2014
Room JG5002,
John Galsworthy Building,
Penrhyn Road Campus, Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University presents:

Professor Mary Beth Mader (Memphis University) – Whence intensity? Deleuze and the revival of a concept

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (CRMEP):

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Chantal Schutz – The scholar’s melancholy is emulation; the musician’s, fantastical: Shakespeare and Dowland

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 16th, 2014

                                                   

Event Date: 16 October 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Chantal Schutz (University of Paris III) with Jamie Akers, lute – “The scholar’s melancholy is emulation; the musician’s, fantastical”:  Shakespeare and Dowland

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Mel Greaves – The Evolutionary Origins of Diversity in Cancer

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 15th, 2014

Systematics Association Logo

Event Date: 15 October 2014
The Linnean Society of London
Burlington House, Piccadilly,
London W1J 0BF

The Systematics Association presents:

The 2014 Sir Julian Huxley Lecture

Professor Mel Greaves FRS (Institute of Cancer Research) - The Evolutionary Origins of Diversity in Cancer

All cancers share the common feature of being clonal expansions of mutant cells that, over years or decades, disseminate within and between tissues, hijacking essential normal functions. But cancers differ widely in their tissue of origin, underlying mutational spectra, time frame of progression, pathological impact and clinical course. The systematics or classification of cancer subtypes therefore poses a considerable challenge with biologists, histopathologists and oncologists applying differing criteria.
Over recent years, a new conceptual framework has emerged that makes biological sense of all the diversity. This views cancer as a process of somatic cell evolution driven by mutational diversification and natural selection or adaptation within the specialised ecosystem habitats of the body. The implications of this new vision for diagnosis, prognostication and control of disease are very substantial.

Lecture:

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Minna Moore Ede – Making a Space for Art: Two case studies: Titian Metamorphosis 2012, National Gallery, London and Sampling the Myth, Royal Opera House, London

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 15th, 2014

Event Date: 15 October 2014

Picture Gallery

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

A talk by Dr Minna Moore-Ede on the occasion of the launch of the HARC 2014-15 Fellowship project ‘Making Space for Art’, a collaboration between the curator of the Picture Gallery at Royal Holloway, Dr Laura MacCulloch, and the Visual Arts and Cinema Research Group in the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures.

Dr Minna Moore Ede (National Gallery, London) – Making a Space for Art: Two case studies: Titian Metamorphosis 2012, National Gallery, London and Sampling the Myth, Royal Opera House, London

Discussants: Professor Ahuvia Kahane (Classics) and Dr Libby Worth (Drama)

Dr Minna Moore Ede is Assistant Curator of Renaissance Paintings at the National Gallery, London. She completed her Ph.D. at Keble College, Oxford in 2002 on Religious Art and Catholic Reform in Italy 1527-1546. Since then she has written and worked on a number of exhibitions at the National Gallery that include Leonardo da Vinci: Painter at the Court of Milan (2011), Renaissance Faces (2008-9), Rubens: A Master in the Making (2006), Raphael: from Urbino to Rome (2004), Polidoro da Caravaggio: The Way to Calvary (2003) and Metamorphosis: Titian 2012.

Introduction by Dr Giuliana Pieri (RHUL):

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Discussion with Dr Giuliana Pieri (Italian, RHUL), Dr Libby Worth (Drama, RHUL) and Professor Ahuvia Kahane (Classics, RHUL):

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Dan Stone – Assessing Holocaust Survivors: Jewish DPs and the International Refugee Organisation in the Early Cold War

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 14th, 2014

Event Date: 14 October 2014

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Professor Dan Stone (RHUL) – Assessing Holocaust Survivors: Jewish DPs and the International Refugee Organisation in the Early Cold War

This talk looks at the ways in which the International Refugee Organisation (the forerunner to UNHCR) assessed Displaced Persons for assistance with relocation to new countries in the late 1940s. Where today we might see Holocaust survivors clearly in need of help, at the time of the early Cold War the IRO’s assessors were just as likely to see ‘economic migrants’ and feared that assisting these refugees would mean importing a potential communist threat.

Introduction by Professor Greg Claeys (RHUL):

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Stanley Fish – But We’re Professors: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 10th, 2014


Event Date: 10 October 2014
John Snow Lecture Theatre
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Keppel St, Bloomsbury,
London WC1E 7HT

Birkbeck School of Law presents:

Annual Law Lecture 2013

‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

The 2014 Annual Law Lecture presented by the School of Law, Birkbeck is ‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States by

Professor Stanley Fish (Florida International University College of Law)

Justification is the key issue in any discussion of academic freedom. Why should academics be granted latitudes and privileges denied to other workers in other professions? One answer sometimes given to this question is that academics are exceptional or uncommon, “men of high gift and character”, and therefore should not suffer under the constraints imposed on ordinary people. In this lecture, Professor Fish explores this claim of academic exceptionalism as it turns up in public employee law in the United States.

Introduction by Professor Patricia Tuitt (Dean, Birkbeck School of Law):

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