Fat Activism is Dangerous

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 25th, 2016


Event Date: 25 April 2016

Room 402
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with Birkbeck Gender and Sexuality (BiGS) presents:

Fat Activism is Dangerous

Charlotte Cooper‘s latest book, Fat Activism: A Radical Social Movement (HammerOn Press) is a para-academic project; an example of research justice; a proposal for queer and feminist activism; a critique of complacency and stagnation; a work that historicises an occupied and overlooked feminist social movement; an argument for exploding the myth of the perfect standard in activism.

Join Charlotte, Noreen Giffney and Naomi Segal for a free-wheeling interdisciplinary panel discussion about this disruptive book. Find out how it came to be written, why fat activism matters to anyone interested in social change, and what makes this social movement uniquely queer and life-enhancing in an age of anti-obesity rhetoric.

The Discussion will be chaired by Jennifer Fraser.

Charlotte Cooper is a psychotherapist, cultural worker and para-academic. She performs with Homosexual Death Drive and in SWAGGA, a dance work conceived by Project O. Charlotte is widely published, her award-winning writing has also been seized for obscenity. Her latest book, Fat Activism: A Radical Social Movement has just been released by HammerOn Press.

Dr Noreen Giffney works as a psychoanalytic psychotherapist in private practice in Dublin, Ireland. She was previously Lecturer in Psychoanalytic Studies in the Department of Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck, University of London. She has published extensively on gender and sexuality studies, cultural studies, and psychoanalysis, including the books: Queering the Non/Human, The Ashgate Research Companion to Queer Theory, The Lesbian Premodern, Theory on the Edge: Irish Studies and the Politics of Sexual Difference, and Twenty-First Century Lesbian Studies. She convenes Psychoanalysis +, an interdisciplinary initiative that brings together clinical, artistic and academic approaches to, and applications of, psychoanalysis. She also provides private research supervision to clinical practitioners conducting research in the fields of psychoanalysis and psychotherapy.

Naomi Segal is a professor of modern languages, specialising in comparative literary and cultural studies, gender, psychoanalysis and the body. In 2004 she created and then directed the Institute of Germanic & Romance Studies, University of London. She has published 15 books, of which the most recent monographs are Consensuality: Didier Anzieu, gender and the sense of touch, André Gide: Pederasty and Pedagogy and The Adulteress’s Child: authorship and desire in the nineteenth-century novel. Naomi Segal is an Academic Associate of the British Psychoanalytical Society, a Chevalier dans l’Ordre des Palmes académiques and a Member of the Academia Europaea.

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Mary Leng – Naturalism and Placement

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 25th, 2016

Event Date: 25 April 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Mary Leng (York) – Naturalism and Placement

Mary Leng is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of York. Prior to coming to York she held a Research Fellowship at St John’s College, Cambridge, and a Lectureship at the University of Liverpool, as well as visiting positions at the University of British Columbia and the University of California at Irvine. She received her PhD in from the University of Toronto, and studied Mathematics and Philosophy as an undergraduate at Balliol College, Oxford. Although a naturalist in the Quinean tradition, she has argued against Quine that the naturalist approach to ontology does not support belief in the existence of mathematical objects. She is interested in the question of what a naturalist should say about other areas of discourse, particularly ethical discourse.

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Charles Nicholl – Counterfeit Presentments: Portraits of Shakespeare and the messages they send

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 21st, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 21 April 2016
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and Trevor Nunn staged the Barton / Hall ‘Wars of the Roses’. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

The Rose Theatre Shakespeare Birthday Lecture

Charles NichollCounterfeit Presentments: Portraits of Shakespeare and the messages they send

Charles Nicholl is the author of numerous Elizabethan studies, including The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe, which won the James Tait Black Prize for biography, and The Lodger: Shakespeare on Silver Street. He has also written an acclaimed biography of Leonardo da Vinci, and an account of Arthur Rimbaud’s years in Africa, Somebody Else, which was awarded the Hawthornden Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and is currently Honorary Professor of English at Sussex.

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Slavoj Žižek – Masterclass 2: Surplus-Value, Surplus-Enjoyment, Surplus-Knowledge

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 19th, 2016


Event Date: 19 April 2016

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Masterclass 2: Is Surplus-Value Marx’s Name For Surplus-Enjoyment?

Slavoj Žižek (International Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities) - Is Surplus-Value Marx’s Name For Surplus-Enjoyment?

Jacques Lacan located the origin of his key notion of plus-de-jouir (surplus-enjoyment) in Marx’s notion of surplus-value, and it is worth exploring in detail the homology of the two notions, adding a third one, that of surplus-knowledge, a pseudo-knowledge in the guise of which our ignorance appears (“supreme” knowledge of God and other hidden forces, conspiracy theories, etc.). Such an analysis is crucial for resuscitating Marx’s critique of political economy, as well as for properly understanding today’s global capitalism and its ideological effects, up to fundamentalist violence.

Recommended reading:
Slavoj Žižek, ‘The Return of the Critique of Political Economy’ in Living in the End of Times (Verso 2010)
Samo Tomšič, The Capitalist Unconscious (Verso Books 2015)

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Childhood and Nation in World Cinema: Borders and Encounters since 1980

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 18th, 2016

Event Date: 18-19 April 2016

Management Building Auditorium

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures at Royal Holloway presents:

Childhood and Nation in World Cinema

Borders and Encounters since 1980

Figuring filmic representations of the child is an important recent trend in cinema studies. Adult cultural investments in the child are acknowledged whilst the most exciting work simultaneously pushes at the boundaries of film theory to create a new cinematic politics of childhood in filmic portrayals of the child’s experience. This conference aims to take forward children’s perceptions of, and involvement in, screen representation.  At the same time, it acknowledges the importance of the child in figuring ideas of nationhood in adult cultural and social consciousness, as it is explored through film.

 

Recorded contributions:

Welcome and introduction by Dr Sarah Wright (RHUL):

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Keynote: Professor Karen Lury (University of Glasgow)  – Children, objects and motion… balloons, bikes, kites and tethered flight

AUDIO HERE

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Keynote:  Professor David Martin Jones (University of Glasgow) – Telling the Story of History with (to, or by) the Child: Non-National, National, and Transnational Takes

AUDIO HERE

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Screening of Little Soldier followed by Q and A with director, Stella Corradi, and producer, Carol-Mei Barker, chaired by Emma Wilson

Little Soldier is the story of 10 year old Anya (Amaris Miller). Anya’s mother Amanda (Zawe Ashton) suffers from addiction, forcing Anya into the role of carer and provider. She works for Derek (Morgan Watkins) a drug dealer who wants to keep Anya and Amanda under his control. However, Anya takes matters into her own hands, with darkly comic consequences. Told entirely from Anya’s perspective, the harsh realities of her life are punctuated with moments of colour and imagination, to suggest a sense of hope and the magic of a child’s resilience to life’s difficulties.

Stella Corradi is a filmmaker, writer, and director. Born in Italy, Stella emigrated to London as a child and has studied and worked in east London ever since. She graduated with a Masters degree in Film from Queen Mary University of London specialising in Latin American cinema. In 2011 she travelled to New York to work as a Production Assistant on A Late Quartet (2012). Stella went on to be mentored by Sally Potter working as Director’s Assistant on Ginger and Rosa (2012), and then with Justin Kurzel on Macbeth (2015). Stella continues to work closely with Sally Potter. Stella speaks fluent Italian and Spanish and is a skilled steel pan player. Stella has made several short films, documentaries and collaborated on various productions.

Carol-Mei Barker is a film writer and academic, with a PhD in Film Studies. She was winner of the 2010 UNESCO ‘City of Film’ Doctoral scholarship, and she specialises in Chinese and British cinema and the city in film. She taught film and media studies at the University of Bradford, and developed educational resources for the charity Film Education. She has written about film for various publications including Time Out London, and in 2013 sat on the short film jury at the Bradford International Film Festival. Carol-Mei lives in east London, where she grew up and also worked as a Learning Mentor to young people. She is also researching a book on social housing and British cinema.

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Little Soldier – Indiegogo Promo Video from Stella Corradi on Vimeo.

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“Films from Le Cinema Cent Ans de Jeunesse, an international film education programme” with Mark Reid (BFI), chaired by Stephi Hemelryk Donald

The international film education programme ‘le Cinema cent ans de jeunesse’ has been running for 20 years under the aegis of the Cinematheque Francaise in Paris.  Each year, groups of children and young people from all over the world participate in a ‘question of cinema’, led by French critic and cineaste Alain Bergala.  The ‘questions’ are always centred on an aspect of aesthetics or form: ‘why move the camera?’, ‘how do films use real things and people to tell stories’, ‘how do filmmakers use long takes in their films?’ The programme is highly structured, around a set of exercises that test and try out formal approaches, and a recommended viewing list of film extracts from all over the world.  At the end of each edition, all the participants make an 8-10 minute film around a common brief, which consolidates some of the learning from the programme. In this session, Mark Reid will share some of the work made by young people from recent editions of the programme, and the specific approaches and activities that support them.’

Mark Reid looks after film education programmes at BFI Southbank in London, England.  He originally trained in, and then taught, English and Media, before joining BFI in 1998 as their Teacher Development Officer, where he set up MA programmes for media and film teachers.  In 2006 he took over leadership of the Education teams at BFI, focusing on building programmes at BFI Southbank. In 2012 he led a research team in a survey of film education in Europe, published as Screening Literacy, and most recently he co-ordinated the EC-funded project that created the Framework for Film Education in Europe.  For the last year 6 years he has been leading the UKs participation in the international film education programme Le Cinéma, Cent Ans de Jeunesse.

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“Engaging Young People with Difficult Pasts through Film”, with Paul Cooke and respondent Kelly Royds

This session will present the results of an AHRC project that looked at the way film can be used to engage young people in discussion about the legacy of Europe’s ‘difficult’ past and its relationship to their place in the world.  The project worked with the Bautzen Memorial in Germany – formerly the main prison of the East German Secret Police – a German community filmmaking organisation and the BFI Film Academy to co-produce a series of films that explore the ways in which popular culture reflects the changing legacy of the GDR in contemporary Germany. The project provided young people, who received filmmaking training, with a means to reflect creatively upon the lessons to be learnt from the GDR dictatorship for contemporary understandings of democracy, global citizenship and the competing ways that notions of ‘heritage’ relate to our sense of identity.

Professor Paul Cooke is Director of the Centre for World Cinemas and Digital Cultures at the University of Leeds. He has published widely on the legacy of the GDR, contemporary German cinema and European heritage drama.  He has undertaken community filmmaking projects with international development charities in Germany and South Africa, with further projects planned in 2016-17 for Bosnia and Palestine.

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Bautzen from Paul Cooke on Vimeo.

Response  by Kelly Royds (New South Wales):

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Keynote: Professor Daniela Berghahn (Royal Holloway) – The Child As Victim and Creator of Postnational Affiliations in Diasporic European Cinema

AUDIO HERE

 

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Slavoj Žižek – Masterclass 1: Surplus-Value, Surplus-Enjoyment, Surplus-Knowledge

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 18th, 2016


Event Date: 18 April 2016

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities  presents:

Masterclass 1:  From Pleasure-in-Pain To Surplus-Enjoyment

Slavoj Žižek (International Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities) –   From Pleasure-in-Pain To Surplus-Enjoyment

Jacques Lacan located the origin of his key notion of plus-de-jouir (surplus-enjoyment) in Marx’s notion of surplus-value, and it is worth exploring in detail the homology of the two notions, adding a third one, that of surplus-knowledge, a pseudo-knowledge in the guise of which our ignorance appears (“supreme” knowledge of God and other hidden forces, conspiracy theories, etc.). Such an analysis is crucial for resuscitating Marx’s critique of political economy, as well as for properly understanding today’s global capitalism and its ideological effects, up to fundamentalist violence.

Recommended reading:
Slavoj Žižek, ‘The Return of the Critique of Political Economy’ in Living in the End of Times (Verso 2010)
Samo Tomšič, The Capitalist Unconscious (Verso Books 2015)

Introduction by Professor Esther Leslie (Birkbeck):

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Richard Bessel – The Violence of Care

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

Event Date: 16 April 2016
Room B02
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Department of History, Classics
& Archaeology, Birkbeck University of London presents:

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

In 1921, Dr Montagu Lomax published a searing indictment of Prestwich Asylum exposing an entrenched sub-culture of malpractice, negligence and abuse. Recent historical research has shown that many of the same practices were still taking place at Prestwich fifty years later.[i]

Today, most institutions provide the best possible standards of care. But abuse can still happen. Stafford Hospital, Winterbourne View and the crimes committed by Jimmy Savile are among the more recent examples of how systemic violence and neglect can be visited upon some of society’s most vulnerable individuals in institutions that have been charged with a special duty of care.

This two-day conference will explore the shifting political, socio-economic, cultural and medical influences that have formed and perpetuated cultures of harm in therapeutic and caring environments from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Professor Richard Bessel (York) – The Violence of Care

Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

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Jonathan Metzl – Bringing Weapons of Harm to Institutions of Care: Guns in Schools, Guns in Hospitals, and the Societal Implications of an ‘Open Carry’ Society in the US

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Various locations around
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Department of History, Classics
& Archaeology, Birkbeck University of London presents:

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

In 1921, Dr Montagu Lomax published a searing indictment of Prestwich Asylum exposing an entrenched sub-culture of malpractice, negligence and abuse. Recent historical research has shown that many of the same practices were still taking place at Prestwich fifty years later.[i]

Today, most institutions provide the best possible standards of care. But abuse can still happen. Stafford Hospital, Winterbourne View and the crimes committed by Jimmy Savile are among the more recent examples of how systemic violence and neglect can be visited upon some of society’s most vulnerable individuals in institutions that have been charged with a special duty of care.

This two-day conference will explore the shifting political, socio-economic, cultural and medical influences that have formed and perpetuated cultures of harm in therapeutic and caring environments from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Professor Jonathan Metzl (Vanderbilt) – Bringing Weapons of Harm to Institutions of Care: Guns in Schools, Guns in Hospitals, and the Societal Implications of an ‘Open Carry’ Society in the US

Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

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Paolo Diego Bubbio – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University) – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

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Bruno Haas – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Bruno Haas (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

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