Christoph Hoerl – Writing on the Page of Consciousness

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 27th, 2015

Event Date: 27 April 2015
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Christoph Hoerl (Warwick) – Writing on the Page of Consciousness

Christoph Hoerl is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. His research is mainly in the philosophy of mind, with a particular interest in philosophical questions about the nature of temporal experience, memory, and our ability to think about time.

Talk:

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Sanity, Madness and the Family / Family Life: An Urgent Retrospective

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 24th, 2015

Event Date: 24 April 2015
Birkbeck Cinema
Birkbeck University of London
43 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) presents:

Sanity, Madness and the Family / Family Life: An Urgent Retrospective

It is just over 50 years since the publication of Sanity, Madness and the Family, R.D. Laing’s and Aaron Esterson’s groundbreaking study of ‘schizophrenia’ in 11 young women. Birkbeck Research in Aesthetics of Kinship and Community (BRAKC) and the Birkbeck Guilt Working Group have organized a one-day symposium to discuss the lasting impact of that book.

Do people still read it? Why is it almost never referred to in psychotherapy trainings in this country? How have the ideas it introduced been either absorbed into or rejected by clinical, academic and more general discourses about the family and mental/emotional illness?

Andrew Asibong, co-director of BRAKC, will facilitate the event, and participants will include Jacqui Dillon, Robbie Duschinsky, Suman Fernando, Amber Jacobs, Oliver James, Lucy Johnstone, Chris Oakley, Lynne Segal and Anthony Stadlen.

Programme:

Welcome by Andrew Asibong (co-director of BRAKC):

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Panel 1

Anthony Stadlen (existential psychotherapist, family therapist, teacher):

Anthony will discuss Sanity, Madness and the Family and some provisional findings from his original research over the last fifteen years on the eleven actual families it studies. This research involves continuing, half a century on, the interviewing of family members undertaken by Esterson (and reported by him and Laing), including those of the eleven diagnosed ‘schizophrenic’ women family members still living.

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Chris Oakley (psychoanalyst, writer):

Chris’s presentation, Sanity, Madness and the Psychoanalysts, will examine Laing and his familiars, and how the issue of rivalrous resemblance came to haunt the scene of collaboration.

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Panel 1 Questions:

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Panel 2

Suman Fernando (psychiatrist, academic, writer):

Suman, taking a transcultural-social approach, will discuss how since the breakup of the European empires and subsequent rise of racism  (in Europe) and civil rights movement (in the US), ‘schizophrenia’ in the West has been re-constructed to fulfil a political purpose (e.g. The Empire Strikes Back – CCCS, 1982; The Protest Psychosis: How Schizophrenia became a Black Disease – Jonathan Metzl, 2009).

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Lynne Segal (academic, activist, author):

Lynne will consider shifts in ‘sexual/personal politics over the last five decades: from the Laingian/anti-psychiatry critique of the family (parental collusion and the smothering mother) of the 60s to the 70s feminist critique of the male-dominated family, to the 90s emphasis on “choice” concluding with the politics of sexual intimacy in this neoliberal age of austerity.

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Panel 2 Questions:

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Panel 3

Jacqui Dillon (writer, campaigner, trainer):

Jacqui will speak about her personal and professional experience in working with trauma and abuse, dissociation, “psychosis”, hearing voices, healing and recovery.

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Robbie Duschinsky (historian of psychology):

Drawing on the ideas of Lauren Berlant, Robbie will discuss Laing and Esterson’s interpretation of the symptoms of ‘flat affect’ as functioning as a mode of self-protection and reserve, and consider how the conditions which provoke flat affect remain live and significant today.

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Panel 3 Questions:

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Panel 4

Lucy Johnstone (consultant clinical psychologist, author, trainer):

Lucy will discuss the various ways in which Laing’s ideas have been denied, rejected or distorted in actual clinical practice, and give brief examples of some of the ways in which his central messages about meaning in madness are currently re-emerging.

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Oliver James (psychologist, psychotherapist, author, broadcaster):

Oliver will argue that despite being disgracefully ignored, the Emotional Expression literature and that on Emotional Abuse give us strong reason to suspect that direct empirical tests of Laing’s theories would support them, not only as regards schizophrenia, but other psychoses, personality disorders and other mental illnesses.

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Panel 4 Questions:

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Presentation by Tony Garnett, producer of In Two Minds and Family Life:

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Screening of Family Life, a 1971 feature film directed by Ken Loach

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Tibetan in Digital Communication – II

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 23rd, 2015

 

Event Date: 23 April 2015
Room T101
Language Centre
22 Russell Square
SOAS, University of London,
WC1H 0XG

The Department of Linguistics at SOAS presents:

Tibetan in Digital Communication II

Tibetan in Digital Communication is a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, engaged in building a 1,000,000 syllable part-of-speech tagged corpus of Tibetan texts spanning the language’s entire history. In addition to the corpus, the project is developing a number of digital tools that allows for the corpus to be employed in many areas of humanities research, and enables other researchers to more easily develop their own corpora or software tools.
The corpus will itself be a powerful resource for scholars working with Tibetan language materials in a wide range of disciplines.

This workshop, held in the project’s final year, presents the progress achieved so far and presages future directions of research andcollaborations outside of academia.

Programme:

Nathan Hill – Tibetan Corpus Linguistics: our progress so far

AUDIO HERE

Ed Garrett  - Applying Constraint Grammar to problems in Tibetan NLP

AUDIO HERE

Abel ZadoksRemarks on Tibetan verbal morphology

AUDIO HERE

Nathan HillTibetan Corpus Linguistics: present obstacle and future prospects

AUDIO HERE

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Peter Conradi – Shakespeare and Iris Murdoch

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 23rd, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 23 April 2015
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Shakespeare Birthday Lecture

Professor Peter Conradi (Kingston) – Shakespeare and Iris Murdoch

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Audience Questions:

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Stella Sandford – The Long Passage: Sex and Race in the History of Philosophy

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 22nd, 2015

 

Event Date: 22 April 2015
Clattern Lecture Theatre,
Penrhyn Road Campus,
Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

Kingston University and the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) present:

Inaugural Lecture:

Professor Stella Sandford (CRMEP) – The Long Passage: Sex and Race in the History of Philosophy

Introduction by Professor Martin McQuillan (Dean, FASS, Kingston):

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Lecture:

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Mandy Merck (RHUL):

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Engineering Professors’ Council Congress 2015

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 14th, 2015

Event Date: 14 – 15 April 2015

Media City
Salford
M50 2EQ

 

 

 

 

The Engineering Professors’ Council presents:

Engineering Professors’ Council Congress 2015

Skills for Impact

This year we’ll be hosted by the University of Salford at their fantastic Media City building and we’re planning to hold our Congress dinner at the Imperial War Museum North under a Harrier jet…
Keynote speakers: Terry Scuoler, Chief Executive of the Engineering Employers’ Federation and Victor Chavez, Chief Executive of Thales UK.

The Distinguished Public Lecture will be delivered by Professor Dame Ann Dowling, President of the Royal Academy of Engineering.

We’ll also be hearing from Professor John Perkins on how his Review of Engineering Skills is being implemented as well as the winner of the 2014/15 20th Anniversary Student Awards (awarded by the Engineering Professors’ Council in collaboration with the Incorporation of Hammermen of Glasgow), amongst others.

Programme:

Tuesday 14 April 2015

Introduction by Professor Helen Atkinson (Leicester):

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Keynote lecture:  Terry Scuoler (CEO Engineering Employers Federation) - Britain’s industrial renaissance and its critical dependency on higher level skills and teaching institutions

AUDIO HERE

Professor John PerkinsUpdate on Perkins Review recommendations

AUDIO HERE

Dr Tim Bullough (University of Liverpool) – Pathways to Success through Engineering Degrees and into Engineering Careers

AUDIO HERE

Rebecca Bale (UCAS) - UCAS’ vision for Information and Advice: supporting Learner Progression in Engineering

AUDIO HERE

Claire Howell (Aston University)  and Alexandra Symonds (Intellectual Property Office) – The importance of teaching intellectual property rights – and a new toolkit

AUDIO HERE

Public Lecture :  Professor Dame Ann Dowling (President of the Royal Academy of Engineering) -  The Reality and Perception of Engineering

AUDIO HERE

Wednesday 15 April 2015

Keynote Lecture: Victor Chavez (CEO Thales UK) – Skills for Impact – An Industry Perspective

POWERPOINT ONLY HERE

Winner of 2015 Student essay prize:

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Accompanying video:

Engaging in Engineering – updates on EPC – funded projects:

Introduction:

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Laura Fogg-Rogers and Catherine Hobbs (UWE) – Children as Engineers: maximising engineering outreach for universities

AUDIO HERE

Emma Carter (University of Sheffield) – Engenius films: sharing the genius of engineering

AUDIO HERE

Susan Scurlock (Primary Engineer) -  The value of engineering in primary schools

AUDIO HERE

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Rosie Llewellyn Jones – The Last King in India: Wajid Ali Shah

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 9th, 2015

Event Date: 9 April 2015
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Dr Rosie Llewellyn JonesThe Last King in India: Wajid Ali Shah

The lecture will examine the extraordinary story of this 19th century king who continues to divide opinion today. Was he, as the British believed, a debauched ruler who spent his time with fiddlers, eunuchs and fairies when he should have been ruling his kingdom? Or was he, as many Indians remember him, a talented poet and musician who was robbed of his throne by the East India Company? Dr Llewellyn-Jones will postulate that the reality lies somewhere between these two extremes: that Wajid Ali Shah was a gifted, but difficult character, who was written out of history when his kingdom was annexed in 1856, but who lived for another thirty years near Calcutta, recreating the lost paradise that was Lucknow.

Dr Rosie Llewellyn-Jones is an authority on colonial India from the 18th to the 20th century. She studied Indian languages at SOAS, and has lived in India, written extensively about it, and visits at least once a year. She has published a number of books on Lucknow, and her book on the Mutiny, The Great Uprising in India: Untold Stories, Indian and British (2007), won critical praise. She lectures for the Asian Arts course at the V&A Museum. She is founder and editor of ‘Chowkidar’, the Journal of the British Association for Cemeteries in South Asia (BACSA). She works as an archivist for the Royal Society for Asian Affairs and has been a member of the RAS since 1985.

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (President, RAS):

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Stuart Foster/Helen Hyde – Teaching and Learning about the Holocaust in School: Challenges and Issues for Contemporary Society

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 31st, 2015

 

Event Date: 31 March 2015
The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London WC1B 5DP

 

The Wiener Library presents:

Professor Stuart Foster with Dame Helen Hyde – Teaching and Learning about the Holocaust in School: Challenges and Issues for Contemporary Society

Stuart Foster’s presentation will draw on the results of two landmark research studies to explore key contemporary issues and challenges associated with teaching the Holocaust in English secondary schools. The first study (2009) offers fascinating insights into the perspectives and practice of more than 2,000 teachers. The second study (due to be published in June 2015) explores students’ knowledge and understanding of the Holocaust. It is the world’s largest study of its kind and involves more than 9,000 secondary school students. Together these two studies provide a compelling portrait of what is being taught and learned in our schools and raises important questions about the significance and meaning of the Holocaust in contemporary society. The presentation will be chaired by Dame Helen Hyde.

Stuart Foster has specialist knowledge and expertise in history education and is also Executive Director of the UCL Institute of Education’s Centre for Holocaust Education. Stuart has worked at the IOE since 2001 and has taught across a broad range of courses and programmes. From 2008 to 2011 he served as Head of the Academic Department of Arts and Humanities.

Dame Helen Hyde was appointed as a member of the Prime Minister’s Holocaust Commission and Chair of its Expert Group for Education in 2014. Dame Helen has been a DfE Quality Assurance Advisor, visiting a variety of schools in various counties, an External Advisor to School Governors and an Executive Mentor to a number of Headteachers. Dame Helen sits on various committees on a local and governmental level.

Introduction by Dr Ben Barkow (Director, Wiener Library):

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Dame Helen Hyde:

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Professor Stuart Foster:

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Response by Dame Helen Hyde:

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Audience Questions:

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Paul Morland – Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

 

 

Event Date: 26 March 2015
Room 414
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Department of Politics presents:

Dr Paul Morland (Birkbeck)- Demographic Engineering: Population Strategies in Ethnic Conflict

with a response from Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange)

“All history is the history of ethnic conflict and in ethnic conflict numbers count.”  With this bold statement, Paul Morland opens his new book which argues that ethnic conflict is pervasive across time and space and those with the weight of numbers on their side, either of soldiers or voters, have at the very least an important advantage and often a decisive one.
It is therefore surprising that little thought has been given to demography in the context of ethnic conflict.  Whilst some consideration has been paid to whether demography causes conflict – when and how particular demographic circumstances may trigger and shape wars and strife – little thinking has been given to how, once conflicts get going, groups use demography as part of their strategy or indeed pursue demography as a strategic goal.
Morland offers a framework for thinking about political demography then uses it to illuminate four cases, Sri Lanka, Northern Ireland, Israel/Palestine and the USA.  The framework revolves around what he calls ‘hard’ and ‘soft’ demographic engineering. Hard demographic engineering involves creating, moving or destroying people, as with genocide, pronatalism and ethnically selective policies of immigration and emigration.  By contrast, soft demographic engineering encompasses the movement of political or identity boundaries in order to incorporate or exclude.
Examples of the hard form include the expatriation of ‘Indian’ Tamils in Sri Lanka, encouragement of Catholic emigration from Northern Ireland, the high birth rate of both Jews and Arabs in Israel / Palestine and the Back to Africa Movement in the United States.  Examples of soft demographic engineering include the partition of Ireland, the Israeli withdrawal from Gaza and the selective annexation of conquered Mexican territory by the United States.
Teasing out sources and supplementing the secondary record with interviews and archival work, Morland has thrown new light on the workings of ethnic conflict and offers an intriguing and fresh perspective on an important part of the way the world works, relevant for historians, geographers, social scientists and policy-makers alike.

Introduction by Professor Eric Kaufmann (Birkbeck):

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Talk:

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Response by Dean Godson (Director, Policy Exchange):

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New Drug Seminars – Supply and demand: drug markets in transition

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

Event Date 26 March 2015
van Mildent College
Durham University
Durham
County Durham DH1 3LH

University of Kent presents:

New Drug Seminars

Seminar 2: New Drugs: Supply and demand: drug markets in transition

This is the second event in the ESRC Seminar Series ‘New Psychoactive Substances and Human Enhancement Drugs’.  The seminar will focus on the impacts of new drugs on the culture, organisation and control of drug supply networks and drug market activities. The impacts at the local, regional and international level will be considered and we aim to include sessions that focus on emerging trends in relation to online supply and new technologies; the development of local NPS markets in response to legislative actions against headshops; and emerging trends in club drug markets.

The seminar will be divided into three sessions that explore: (i) online markets and new technologies, (ii) street markets, and (iii) club markets.

Speakers include:  Monica Barratt (National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, University of New South Wales); Michael Linnell (independent researcher and practitioner); Professor Rainer Schmidt (University of Vienna); Professor Fiona Measham (University of Durham); Dr Russell Newcombe (3D research); Steve Rolles (Transform);  Charlie McLean & Jennifer Brizell (Liverpool John Moores University); Deirdre Ruane (University of Kent).

Programme:

Welcome Fiona Measham (Professor of Criminology, Durham University):

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Introduction and Chair: Steve Rolles (Transform):

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SESSION 1
STREET MARKETS AND NPS
Russell Newcombe (Independent Researcher- 3D research) – ‘NPS Taxonomy: A framework for classifying new psychoactive substances’:

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Michael Linnell (Independent researcher) – ‘Green Crack’ – the infectious nature of synthetic cannabinoids among vulnerable groups of adults and young people and the tragicomic attempts of the state to control the spice market:

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SESSION 2
CLUB and FESTIVAL MARKETS

This roundtable session will examine emerging trends in the supply and consumption of new drugs in nightlife and music settings and the prevention of drug related harms.  The panellists in this session will be Professor Rainer Schmid (Scientific Head of the Viennese drug prevention project checkit!), Professor Fiona Measham (Co-Director of The Loop, a not for profit CIC which provides drug and alcohol harm reduction advice, research, training and drug testing at UK nightclubs and festivals) and Deidre Ruane (PhD student, University of Kent, conducting research into the role of drug checking services in the reduction of NPS-related harm at UK festivals).  The panellist will first introduce their work in the area of new drugs, new technologies and harm reduction within club and festival settings, before opening up the session for discussion and debate.
Chair: Steve Rolles (Transform)
Recording of presentations only:
Professor Rainer Schmid (Scientific Head of the Viennese drug prevention project checkit!):

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Deidre Ruane (PhD student, University of Kent, conducting research into the role of drug checking services in the reduction of NPS-related harm at UK festivals):

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Professor Fiona Measham (Co-Director of The Loop, a not for profit CIC which provides drug and alcohol harm reduction advice, research, training and drug testing at UK nightclubs and festivals):

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SESSION 3
ONLINE MARKETS AND NEW TECHNOLOGIES
Dr Monica Barratt via google+ (National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre, UNSW Australia)  – ‘Brought up by and in the internet’: First time drug use through cryptomarkets:

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Charlie McLean and Jennifer Brizell (PhD students Liverpool John Moores University) – Human Enhancement Drugs (HEDs) and the changing marketplace: From the Daily Mirror to online markets:

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Steve Rolles (Transform) – Drugs Markets in transition- key themes emerging from the seminar:

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