Max Porter – Grief is the Thing with Feathers

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 18th, 2016

Event Date: 18 May 2016
Room B04
Birkbeck School of Arts
Birkbeck University of London
43 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck School of Arts presents:

Birkbeck Arts Week 2016

Max Porter: Grief is the Thing with Feathers

Max Porter’s debut novel, Grief is the Thing With Feathers (Faber, 2015) tells the story of a family torn apart by the sudden death of a mother. The father, a Ted Hughes scholar, and his two sons are visited by Crow, part-trickster, part-Mary Poppins, part-Freudian nightmare, an imaginary being who vows to stay with them until they have worked through their loss. Poetic and formally innovative, Grief marks the emergence of a radically original literary talent. Hear Max Porter discuss his critically acclaimed book with Birkbeck academic and novelist Mark Blacklock.

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Cam Sharp Jones – Indian Tribal Ethnography in the 19th century

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 17th, 2016

Event Date: 17 May 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Cam Sharp Jones (Manchester) – Indian Tribal Ethnography in the 19th century

Introduction by Dr Alison Otha (Director, RAS):

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The Radical Politics of Birkbeck’s Past

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 16th, 2016

Event Date: 16 May 2016
Room 101
Birkbeck College
30 Russell Square
London WC1B

The Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life presents:

The Radical Politics of Birkbeck’s Past

Richard Clarke in Conversation with Jason Edwards

 Come along and hear how central Birkbeck was to providing working-class Londoners access to real education in an era when such ideas were considered radical and potentially dangerous. In his research Richard Clarke has identified, and visited, the sites of the Birkbeck Bank, its Land and Building Societies and the Birkbeck Estates (including the Birkbeck Railway Station), the Birkbeck Schools, and the four remaining Birkbeck pubs (two of which still serve alcohol). Through his investigations he has revealed the hidden history that Birkbeck played in changing the physical as well as the political landscape of London.

There are many grand institutions in London that have a lauded and venerable history but the significant role Birkbeck played in challenging a social order that deprived London’s working people of a decent home, the vote and an education is not widely known. In the run up to Birkbeck’s bicentenary in 2023 it’s high time that that we revisited Birkbeck’s radical past concealed within London’s streets.

Richard Clarke was Senior Lecturer in Conservation at Birkbeck College and Director of the University of London Centre for European Protected Area Research (CEPAR) until 2012. Amongst many other interests Richard has undertaken a truly fascinating study of 19th century suburbanisation in relation to the Birkbeck Land and Building Society. He has examined the relationship between 19th century contested (individual and collective) models of useful knowledge and ‘self-help’ and their manifestation in working-class housing in the activities of the Birkbeck Bank and Building Society (once the largest in the world) and education through Birkbeck Schools, which pioneered what were then progressive teaching techniques.

Jason Edwards is a lecturer in politics in the Department of Politics, Birkbeck. Jason is a political theorist with interests in political sociology and the history of political thought. Jason is an expert in radical politics. His book The Radical Attitude and Modern Political Theory (London: Palgrave Macmillan) was published in 2007 and he continues to return to the theme throughout his writing.

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Birkbeck Arts Week 2016

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on May 16th, 2016

Event Dates: 16 -20 May 2016
Birkbeck School of Arts
Birkbeck University of London
43 Gordon Square
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck School of Arts presents:

Birkbeck Arts Week 2016

Join us for Arts Week 2016, running from Monday 16 to Saturday 21 May 2016. The week will include lectures, readings, concerts, film screenings, taster courses, performances and panel discussions and is our annualshowcase of the varied enterprises of Birkbeck academics, on topics both public and scholarly.

The programme of events reflects the liveliness of teaching and research within Birkbeck’s School of Arts, whose internationally renowned academics address some of the most important issues that affect our society today.

A selection of events will be recorded and made available here.

Monday 16 May 2016
Birkbeck Main Building Room Mal 417

Local Government Sustaining the Arts: an Oxymoron for Heretics

Wednesday 18 May 2016
43 Gordon Square Room B04

Max Porter: Grief is the Thing with Feathers

Thursday 19 May 2016
Birkbeck Main Building Room Mal 153

Brutalism: from New to Neo

Friday 20 May 2016
43 Gordon Square Room B04

You must Mutate: Toby Litt and Caroline Edwards Discuss the Future of Fiction

Friday 20 May 2016
43 Gordon Square Room G10

Theatre Conversation: The Complete Deaths

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Nicholas Sims-Williams – The Bactrian archives: Reconstructing the lost history of Ancient Afghanistan

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 12th, 2016

Event Date: 12 May 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor Nicholas Sims-Williams (SOAS) – The Bactrian archives: Reconstructing the lost history of Ancient Afghanistan

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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Digital Subjects

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on May 12th, 2016

Event Date: 12 May 2016

Room 264
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway presents:

Digital Subjects

 Digital subjects can be many things: a nested set of abstractions assembled by algorithms; a dynamic data aggregate feeding upon the movement of bodies in space and time; an experiential, sensuous presence and performance online. Digital subjects are the subjects of profiles, video channels, search query histories, inboxes, logs of GPS coordinates, traded data of financial transactions or travel card usage.

The reason why it’s worth calling them subjects are the new ontological and epistemological demands placed by the rapid development of computational infrastructures and our cyborgian lives. The question of the digital subject is a political question wielded by the disciplinary lines of differentiation. These lines are cut in the thick distance that joins together human, posthuman, nonhuman and the digital. At times, the distance is vast (one can reinvent oneself online). At other times, the distance collapses (one can be assaulted online). Some humanities regard digital subjects from the point of view of the operation of representational data surveillance (data gathered forms a shadow of the human) and a political/legal question; some data sciences ignore the distance and claim that data gives direct access to, in this case, humans (people are equal to their tweets). Many contemporary art practices, especially feminist performances online, explore the distance as a thick field of production that is not fully determined.

The critique of the subject is well established: it is almost a blasphemy to bring the question of the subject up in critical theory. Yet, the question of the subject returns under the guise of digital self, personhood, identity and citizenship. Digital subjects are generated and pertain to the continuum linking them to non-human subjects (trees, animals with sensors; robots) as well as collectives (extremist groups sharing technical devices). Digital subjects could be theatrical or conceptual performances of personae (troll, lurker, idiot) or the actual happenings of events of life. Yet, the ways in which they are produced and managed (in computation and in digital cultures), the ways in which they respond to whatever entities they’re linked to, their energies, emergence and dissipation are unclear. Even if digital subjects are entirely generated by self-sufficient computational machines, their forms of unity, generation and power are new and unknown.

At which layers and times do aggregations such as digital subjects operate as enactive subjects? How do digital subjects become subjects? How do we understand and problematise the distance between digital subjects and their generative sources? How does a digital subject acquire its difference, a capacity to enlarge and shrink this distance? What forms of causality operate between subjects and digital subjects? What kind of reason, expression and sense are operative here? What forms of interiority and exteriority, forms of unity and disunity characterise the subject-digital subject continuum?

The aim of the event is to rethink the subject and think the digital subject from the point of view of different genealogies, reasons, expressions and logics. What we aim to work towards is not a return to any previous form of unity, but a way to construct an understanding of computational kinds of subjects and their ways of generation, production, and sustenance.

This is a Royal Holloway’s Humanities and Arts Research Centre event in cooperation with the Department of Media Arts.

 PROGRAMME

Welcome by Professor Katie Normington (Vice Principal (Staffing) and Dean of Arts and Social Science, RHUL):

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Introduction by Dr Olga Goriunova (RHUL):

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Panel 1

Chair: Silvia Mollicchi

Lisa Blackman – Data are Us? The challenges of computational cultures for theorising the subject(s) of digital mediation

AUDIO HERE

Luciana ParisiThe Alien Subject of AI

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Panel 2

Chair: Nathan Jones

Katerina Kolozova  – Subjectivity without physicality

AUDIO HERE

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Panel 3

Chair: Scott Wark

Andreas Bernard – The Knowledge of the Profile. Conceptions of the Self in Digital Cultures

AUDIO HERE

Christoph Engemann -  Declarative & Procedural Identity – Governmediality after Snowden

AUDIO HERE

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Panel 4

Chair: Giles Askham

Rózsa Zita Farkas – Feminist Performance on the Web

AUDIO HERE

Erica Scourti – Evasive Actions: on the Limits of Intelligibility

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This symposium was conceived and organised by Dr Olga Goriunova. Olga Goriunova is a Senior Lecturer at the department of Media Arts, Royal Holloway, University of London. She is the author of Art Platforms and Cultural Production on the Internet (Routledge, 2012), editor of Fun and Software. Exploring Pleasure, Pain and Paradox in Computing (Bloomsbury, 2013), co-editor of Readme. Software Art and Cultures (Aarhus University Press, 2005). She is a co-editor of Computational Culture. The Journal of Software Studies. In 2014-2016, she is part of the Posthumanities International Network and member of the Visual Social Media lab. She is writing a new monograph on the notions of the digital subject/subjectivity in relation to data mining, patterns and modeling as well as media art and online performance.

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Peter Poellner – Phenomenology and the Perceptual Model of Emotion

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 9th, 2016

Event Date: 9 May 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Peter Poellner (Warwick) – Phenomenology and the Perceptual Model of Emotion

Peter Poellner is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. He has published on topics in the philosophy of value, the philosophy of mind, and the history of philosophy – in the latter area, especially on Nietzsche, Husserl and Sartre.

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New Drug Seminars: Treatment, Community Interventions and Harm Reduction

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on May 4th, 2016

Event Date 4 May 2016
Redmonds Building
Liverpool John Moores University
Liverpool L3 5UG

University of Kent presents:

New Drug Seminars

Seminar 6: New Drugs: New Drug Seminars: Treatment, Community Interventions and Harm Reduction

The 6th event in our ESRC funded seminar series focuses on treatment, community interventions and harm reduction approaches to new drugs (NPS/HED/IPED etc).

The seminar will discuss latest guidelines and best practice on the topic, but extends this to take a critical perspective on how and why particular approaches are prioritised, and what role evidence plays in development of interventions. We will also seek to better understand opportunities for users and the marketplace to complement our suite of responses, and how policy environments may facilitate or present barriers to particular intervention actions.

Programme:

Prof Harry Sumnall (CPH LJMU; Chair for the day) – Welcome and opening remarks

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Dr Alessandro Pirona (EMCDDA) – Interventions and drug policy environments in the EU

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Dr Kathryn Oliver (University of Oxford) – How policy makers use evidence

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Dr Katinka van de Ven (Birmingham City University) – ‘Blurred lines’: Anti-doping, national policies, and the performance and image enhancing drug (PIED) market in Belgium and the Netherlands

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Joe Kean (Nine Zero Five, Bradford) – Tailoring harm reduction services for anabolic steroid users

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Dr Rebecca Askew (MMU) – Drug Dealers Can Advertise: How Drug Cryptomarket Vendors incorporate harm reduction into the sale of illicit substances

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Jamie Tully (LJMU PhD student) – Cognitive enhancers and learning technologies in University students

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Rick Bradley (Addaction) – Young People and NPS in Practice: Changing Perceptions and Calculated Risks

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Emma Begley (CPH, LJMU) – Social rituals and sanctions informing online harm reduction

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‘Crisis’ in Excess: Performing Europe Today

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 29th, 2016

 

Event Date: 29 April 2016
Performing Arts Studio 5
The University of Winchester
Sparkford Road,
Winchester  SO22 4NR

 

The Department of Performing Arts at the University of Winchester presents:

‘Crisis’ in Excess: Performing Europe Today

Since 2008, the term ‘crisis’ has marked the institutional, socio-political, cultural and academic landscapes of contemporary Europe. This rather malleable, ‘sticky’ term seems to operate as both the cause and the result of the pathologies of the present moment – but, ultimately, it has been voided of meaning. The discourse of ‘crisis’ is producing a limited perspective on the present, haunted by ghosts of the past or doomed to a perpetual route to nowhere. At the same time, this volatile moment of ‘crisis’ has generated a body of writing and cultural works, which are directly aiming to engage with the ‘crisis’; by such means, the ‘crisis’ is both critiqued and normalized.

In an interview (‘A precarious dialogue’ Radical Philosophy autumn 2013), Jacques Rancière has pointed out that ‘we must try to think what we ourselves mean when we use the very word “crisis”’; in this symposium, the Inside/Outside Europe Research Network aims to do that. We wish to consider the value and political purchase of the term, which we have been using constantly since the formation of our research network in 2013, by focusing particularly on the ways in which theatre and performance (as practices and studies) can undo or offer insight into the semantics of ‘crisis’. If the crisis, as Rancière proposes, ‘is an excess in the logic of the system’, how can performance exceed such excessive logics? What is the place of history and memory for approaching the ‘crisis’ and the ways in which Europe is conjured through the prism of the ‘crisis’? What can we learn from the archives of the past about the archives that are assembled in the present? Ultimately, do we still need to use the term ‘crisis’ or might it be useful to return to the writings of Walter Benjamin, who in his 1940 Theses on the Philosophy of History reminds us that ‘the “state of emergency” in which we live is not the exception but the rule’?

The event aims to offer a platform for sharing methodologies of historicizing and contesting dominant discourses around ‘crisis’, excess, pathology, emergency and ultimately the need for ‘cure’.

 

Marilena Zaroulia (Winchester) – Welcome and Opening Remarks: ‘Crisis as Excess’ :

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SESSION 1: HISTORIES, FUTURES, AND THE CRISIS

PANEL 1 ‘Ghosts of Times Past’: Temporalities and the Crisis

Giulia Palladini  (Kunsthochschule Berlin-Weißensee) – Testing the Present, Delaying the future: on Work, Metrics and Value in Times of Crisis

AUDIO HERE

David Calder (University of Manchester) – Thinking Theatrically: The Spatial and Temporal Logics of Post-industrial Europe

AUDIO HERE

PANEL 1 Questions:

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PANEL 2 Memories, Imagination, Spectacle

Aylwyn Walsh (University of Lincoln) – Crisis and dis-imagination: spectacle and disposable futures

AUDIO HERE

Philip Hager (Winchester/Kingston) -  Athens re-membered: 17 November 1973 and the geographies of memory

AUDIO HERE

PANEL 2 Questions:

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SESSION 2: PERFORMING THE CRISIS

PANEL 3 Bodies, Space and Excess

Alessandra Cianetti (Central St Martin’s/Something Human) -  Núria Güell: Exceeding financial and identity European policies through the body of the artist

AUDIO HERE

Noyale Colin (Winchester) -  A ‘planetary problem’: contemporary responses within European dance theatre to the ‘crisis’ of belonging

AUDIO HERE

PANEL 3 Question:

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PANEL 4: Agency, affect and performance

Marissia Fragkou (Canterbury Christchurch) -  Crisis or Precarity? ‘Navigating what’s overwhelming’

AUDIO HERE

Lisa AlexanderPersonal address and collective witness: short acts of gifting and poetic agency – Love Letters to a (Post-)Europe, BIOS, Athens 2015

AUDIO HERE

PANEL 4 Questions and concluding remarks:

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Indian Shakespeare on Screen

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 27th, 2016

Event Dates: 27 – 30 April 2016
Asia House
63 New Cavendish St,
London W1G 7LP

Indian Shakespeare on Screen

Indian Shakespeares on stage have garnered the increasing attention of academics both Western and Eastern, yet local and regional screen versions continue to be largely overlooked within the scope of Shakespeare on film. It has been a decade since the publication of India’s Shakespeare: Translation, Interpretation and Performance (2005), in which Poonam Trivedi observes that despite the seven hundred million speakers of different Indian languages worldwide, Shakespeare’s impact on the theatre and films in the languages has yet to be accorded the critical attention it merits.

In 2014, we hosted a one-day conference in London to discuss the relationship between Shakespeare and Hindi cinema/ Bollywood, the world’s largest cinema industry. In 2016, we seek to widen this discussion to include the relationship between Shakespeare and Indian cinema, bringing together researchers and filmmakers to establish the state of current scholarships in the vibrant, underexamined field. At the beautiful central London venue Asia House we are proud to welcome Vishal Bhardwaj and the scriptwriters of his Shakespeare Trilogy, leading academics in Shakespeare appropriation and Indian cinemas and Film London: Microwave India to present a sneak preview of an exciting new cinematic collaboration between the UK and India via Shakespeare. We also present, for the first time in the UK, a selection of cinematic memorabilia documenting Shakespeare on Indian screens from the National Film Archive of India.

A selection of the conference talks have been recorded:

27 April: Day 1 at Asia House

Opening remarks by Thea Buckley and Koel Chatterjee:

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Plenary:

Setting the Scene
Roundtable: Poonam Trivedi, Diana Henderson and Deana Rankin:

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Keynote Panel: The Bhardwaj Shakespeare Trilogy
Chaired by: Varsha Panjwani
Vishal Bhardwaj, Director of Maqbool, Omkara and Haider discusses his Indian Shakespeare trilogy with his scriptwriters Abbas Tyrewala (Maqbool) and Robin Bhatt (Omkara).:

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28 April: Day 2 at Asia House

Plenary
Chaired by: Koel Chatterjee
Jonathan Gil HarrisShakespearean Masala

AUDIO HERE

Panel 5a:

Script Reading and Discussion: Have the Shakespeares on Screen Forsaken Shakespeare’s love of Science?
Chaired by: Thea Buckley
Carole Jahme, RSC fellow and winner of the 2012 Science and Technology Facilities Council Award for public engagement enacts scenes from The Merry Wives of Munnar and leads a panel on Science, Shakespeare and India

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Panel 5b:

Talk: Introducing The Hungry – the new Titus Andronicus, set in contemporary Mumbai
Chaired by Preti Taneja, Q+A lead by Deborah Sathe, Film London Head of Talent Development & Production.
With Briony Hanson and Kurban Kassam

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Microwave International: India from Film London on Vimeo.

29 April: Day 3 at Asia House

Plenary:
Chaired by: Preti Taneja
Mark Thornton BurnettGendered Play and Regional Dialogue in Nanjundi Kalyana

AUDIO HERE

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SPECIAL SCREENINGS: BFI Southbank

Maqbool (133 mins) Introduced by Koel Chatterjee

Post Screening Q+A: Director Vishal Bhardwaj and Scriptwriter Abbas Tyrewala in conversation with Thea Buckley.

AUDIO HERE

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Sat 30 April: Day 4 at the BFI

Omkara (150 mins) Introduced by Koel Chatterjee

Post Screening Q+A: Director Vishal Bhardwaj and Scriptwriter Robin Bhatt in conversation with Dr. Varsha Panjwani

AUDIO HERE

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Haider (159 mins) Introduced by Koel Chatterjee

Pre Screening Q+A: Director Vishal Bhardwaj in conversation with Dr. Preti Taneja.

AUDIO HERE

 

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