Paolo Diego Bubbio – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University) – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Bruno Haas – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Bruno Haas (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Myriam Bienenstock – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Myriam Bienenstock  (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours) – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Allan Young – Trauma and Harm

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Room B34
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Department of History, Classics
& Archaeology, Birkbeck University of London presents:

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

In 1921, Dr Montagu Lomax published a searing indictment of Prestwich Asylum exposing an entrenched sub-culture of malpractice, negligence and abuse. Recent historical research has shown that many of the same practices were still taking place at Prestwich fifty years later.[i]

Today, most institutions provide the best possible standards of care. But abuse can still happen. Stafford Hospital, Winterbourne View and the crimes committed by Jimmy Savile are among the more recent examples of how systemic violence and neglect can be visited upon some of society’s most vulnerable individuals in institutions that have been charged with a special duty of care.

This two-day conference will explore the shifting political, socio-economic, cultural and medical influences that have formed and perpetuated cultures of harm in therapeutic and caring environments from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Professor Allan Young (McGill) – Trauma and Harm

Introduction by Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<back to conference page>>

 

No Comments

George di Giovanni – Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor George di Giovanni (McGill University) – Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Stefania Achella – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Stefania Achella (University of Chieti) – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Francois Kervégan – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

<<Back to conference page>>

No Comments

Hegel and the Concept of World History

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 14th, 2016

Event Date: 14 and 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.
Plenary speakers

  •     Stefania Achella (University of Chieti, Pescara & Ecole Normale Supérieure of Pisa)
  •     Myriam Bienenstock (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours)
  •     Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University)
  •     George di Giovanni (McGill University)
  •     Bruno Haas (University of Dresden)
  •     Jean- Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne)

———————————————————————————–

Thursday 14 April 2016

Welcome and outline of conference by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

PLAY

 

download

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano (HegeLab, University of Eastern Piedmont):

PLAY

 

download

Keynotes:

Professor Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

AUDIO HERE

Professor Stefania Achella (University of Chieti) – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

AUDIO HERE

Professor George di Giovanni (McGill University) - Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

AUDIO HERE

Discussion of Keynotes (Chair: Maurizio Pagano):

PLAY

 

download

———————————————————

Friday 15 April 2016

Professor Myriam Bienenstock  (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours) – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

AUDIO HERE

Professor Bruno Haas (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

AUDIO HERE

Professor Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University) – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

AUDIO HERE

Discussion of Keynotes (Chair: Peter Osborne):

PLAY

 

download

 

 

 

No Comments

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 14th, 2016

Event Date: 15 – 16 April 2016
Various locations around
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Department of History, Classics    
& Archaeology, Birkbeck University of London presents:

Cultures of Harm in Institutions of Care: Historical & Contemporary Perspectives

In 1921, Dr Montagu Lomax published a searing indictment of Prestwich Asylum exposing an entrenched sub-culture of malpractice, negligence and abuse. Recent historical research has shown that many of the same practices were still taking place at Prestwich fifty years later.[i]

Today, most institutions provide the best possible standards of care. But abuse can still happen. Stafford Hospital, Winterbourne View and the crimes committed by Jimmy Savile are among the more recent examples of how systemic violence and neglect can be visited upon some of society’s most vulnerable individuals in institutions that have been charged with a special duty of care.

This two-day conference will explore the shifting political, socio-economic, cultural and medical influences that have formed and perpetuated cultures of harm in therapeutic and caring environments from the eighteenth century to the present day.

Recorded contributions:

14 April 2016:
Room B34, Birkbeck,
Malet St, London WC1E 7HX

Professor Allan Young (McGill) – Trauma and Harm

AUDIO HERE

————————————–

15 April 2016
Room B04, Birkbeck,
Malet St, London WC1E 7HX

Introduction to the themes of the conference by Dr Louise Hide (Birkbeck):

PLAY

 

download

————————————–

Professor Jonathan Metzl (Vanderbilt) – Bringing Weapons of Harm to Institutions of Care: Guns in Schools, Guns in Hospitals, and the Societal Implications of an ‘Open Carry’ Society in the US

AUDIO HERE

————————————–

16 April 2016
Room B04, Birkbeck,
Malet St, London WC1E 7HX

Professor Richard Bessel (York) – The Violence of Care

AUDIO HERE

————————————–

Birkbeck Cinema
Gordon Sq
London, WC1H 0PD

Undercover: Institutional Abuse, Covert Investigations and History

with: Professor Allan Young (McGill), Professor Joanna Bourke (Birkbeck), Dr Helena Goodwyn (QMUL), Joe Plomin (BBC) and Dr Matthew Rubery (QMUL)
Chair: Professor Daniel Pick (Birkbeck)

PLAY

 

download

 

You can find the Birkbeck Trauma Project website here

No Comments

Wendy Pullan – In the Shadow of the Wall: Icon and Identity in Jerusalem’s Separation Barrier

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 14th, 2016

Event Date: 14 April 2015
German Historical Institute
17 Bloomsbury Square,
London WC1A 2NJ

European Leo Baeck Institute Lecture Series 2015-16

The Politics of Land. Archaeology, Architecture and City Planning in Israel

A lecture series organised by the Leo Baeck Institute London, in cooperation with the German Historical Institute London.

This season’s theme intends to approach its broad subject via a spectrum of political, legal and cultural perspectives. We will examine more closely how the realities of ‘land’ or ‘territory’ impact on the daily lives of Israeli and foreign citizens living in the State of Israel, be they Israeli, Palestinian, Jewish, Muslim or Christian.

Lecture 4:

Dr Wendy Pullan (Cambridge) – In the Shadow of the Wall: Icon and Identity in Jerusalem’s Separation Barrier

In Jerusalem, the separation barrier has galvanized public opinion, both in its role as a hard barrier inside a divided city and as the visible ‘tip of the iceberg’ that reflects only a fraction of the political and military regime supporting the occupation. This lecture will acknowledge the wall’s political status but focus on issues to do with the iconicity of such a structure, including its power in situ in the human landscape, in the media and in its existential meanings.

Wendy Pullan is based at the University of Cambridge where she is Head of the Department of Architecture and Director of the Centre for Urban Conflicts Research. Her recent publications include: Locating Urban Conflicts (2013), Architecture and Pilgrimage (2013) and The Struggle for Jerusalem’s Holy Places (2013). She is a Fellow of Clare College, Cambridge. Further details: www.conflictincities.org; www.urbanconflicts.arct.cam.ac.uk

Welcome by Dr Michael Schaich (Deputy Director, GHIL):

PLAY

 

download

Introduction by Dr Daniel Wildmann (Director, LBI):

PLAY

 

download

Talk:

PLAY

 

download

Questions:

PLAY

 

download

1 Comment