David Anderson – Terrorism and Tolerance

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 13th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016

Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London presents:

The 2016 Magna Carta Lecture

David Anderson QC (Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation) - Terrorism and Tolerance: UK’s independent ‘terror watchdog’ asks how we reconcile traditional freedoms with prevention of terrorism

In Terrorism and Tolerance, David Anderson will ask to what extent international law can help us to reconcile free society with the prevention of extremism. Under real threat of terrorism, both chronic and acute, the UK’s multi-pronged response has been influential and in many respects successful.  But a controversial element of that response has been the Prevent strategy, recently extended beyond the field of terrorism by the Government’s counter-extremism strategy of October 2015.
David Anderson says: ‘Key to the battle for hearts and minds is toleration: but policies based on that principle will forfeit public support if tolerance is extended too far or in the wrong directions.  My lecture will explore the capacity of international human rights law as a practical framework for deciding what must be tolerated and what must not’.
In 2011 David Anderson was appointed by the Home Secretary to be the Independent Reviewer of Terrorism Legislation, a part-time role which he combines with his practice commitments.  His report A Question of Trust bore fruit in the Investigatory Powers Bill 2015.  He was named by The Times in 2012 as one of the UK’s 100 most influential lawyers and chosen as Legal Personality of the Year by the judges of the Halsbury Legal Awards 2015.

The annual Magna Carta Lectures extend the legacy of the Magna Carta and the tradition of protest, liberty and the rule of law it has inspired since 1215, when the great charter was sealed at Runnymede, close to Royal Holloway’s campus.

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Clive Scott – Imagining a Philosophy of Literary Translation

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 13th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016
ALT1
Arts Building
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

 

The School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Royal Holloway, University of London presents:

Keynote Lecture at the 2016 Postgraduate Colloquium

Professor Clive Scott (Professor Emeritus, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing University of East Anglia) – Imagining a Philosophy of Literary Translation

We too often ask of a literary translation what account it gives of an author or a work, without further asking what it contributes to translation itself. But if translation is not an occasional specialist service, but a mode of writing our reading of a foreign, or indeed a native, text, that is, potentially a mode of writing in which we all might participate, then we need urgently to know what kind of knowledge we invest in it and derive from it, how it affects our being-in-the-world, how it relates us to our environment. For these reasons, literary translation deserves a philosophy. But despite our absorbing the thinking of philosophers on translation – for example, Schleiermacher, Benjamin, Derrida – we have done relatively little to examine translation as a mechanism of consciousness, or of perception, or of linguistic experience. In beginning to nibble at this particular challenge, this lecture looks at translation in relation to time, situation and sense, to try to grasp how it redistributes categories, brings to visibility what is hidden in a text and re-organizes expressive energies as an experiment in the renewal of articulacy.

Introduction by Professor Eric Robertson (RHUL):

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Sarah Ansari – India at War: the Bombay Presidency’s ‘Home Front’, 1914-1918

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 9th, 2016

Event Date: 9 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor Sarah Ansari (Royal Holloway) – India at War: the Bombay Presidency’s ‘Home Front’, 1914-1918

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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The EU Referendum: Will it be In or Out?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 8th, 2016

Event Date: 8 June 2016
Room 153
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Department of Politics at Birkbeck University of London presents:

The EU Referendum: Will it be In or Out?

On Thursday 23 June the UK will vote on whether to stay in the European Union or leave in one of the most important political events of modern times.

As the polls get closer and the debate heats up, staff from Birkbeck Politics will hold a Q&A panel event to discuss how the two campaigns have gone so far, what the polls are telling us and whether they can answer the big question: Will it be Remain or Leave on June 23rd?

With Professor Rosie Campbell, Dr Dermot Hodson, Dr Jason Edwards, Dr Dionyssis Dimitrakopoulos and Professor Deborah Mabbett

Chair: Dr Ben Worthy

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Laurence Grove – Creating Comic Invention

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 8th, 2016

Event Date: 8 June 2016

Management Building Lecture Theatre

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Professor Laurence Grove (Glasgow) – Creating Comic Invention

The Comic Invention exhibition has stirred media interest worldwide. It showcases treasures from the ancient Egyptians onwards alongside Hogarth, Rembrandt, Picasso, Lichtenstein, Télémaque, Hockney, Warhol, and the first major display of original drawings by Frank Quitely (DC Comics). It presents the world’s first comic, The Glasgow Looking Glass (1825), alongside the original manuscript and initial printed edition of Rodolphe Töpffer’s Histoire de Monsieur Jabot (c. 1833). Contextualising the debate that surrounds the world’s first comic, this highly illustrated lecture will examine the current status of comics with respect to art and literature, using as linking point the ups and downs of the making of Comic Invention.

Part of the HARC Making Space for Art Lecture Series.

Introduction by Professor Eric Robertson (RHUL):

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Hilary Greaves – Cluelessness

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 6th, 2016

Event Date: 6 June 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Hilary Greaves (Oxford) – Cluelessness

Hilary Greaves is Associate Professor in Philosophy at the University of Oxford. Her research interests include foundational issues in consequentialism (‘global’ and ‘two-level’ forms of consequentialism), aggregation, moral psychology and selective debunking arguments, population ethics, the interface between ethics and economics, the analogies between ethics and epistemology, and formal epistemology. She currently directs a three-year project on population ethics, funded by The Leverhulme Trust.

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T. J. Clark Masterclass – Heaven and Earth According to Bruegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 1st, 2016

 

Event Date: 1, 2 and 6 June 2016

Room 421
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

T. J. Clark Masterclass – Heaven and Earth According to Bruegel

This Masterclass – which is spread over three sessions – will revolve around a painting by Bruegel, The Land of Cockaigne (Munich, Alte Pinakothek), done in 1567, the year the Duke of Alva brought a Spanish army to the Netherlands to try to end Protestant revolt in the colony. Bruegel’s painting is a vision of the hereafter, building on materials drawn from peasant culture, launched at a moment of bitter religious strife. An account of Bruegel’s imagining of heaven on earth, and of his wider treatment of Christian and other eschatologies, will form the first chapter of a book in preparation, Heaven on Earth: Bruegel, Giotto, Poussin, Veronese. The Masterclass will outline the preoccupations of the book, and its possible relevance in a time like the present, of renewed apocalyptic politics and wars of religion. Thinking about Bruegel and the other artists in the book is, among other things, my way of pursuing issues – of political temporality, and reform versus revolution – broached in an essay, ‘For A Left With No Future,’ published in New Left Review in 2012, and as a booklet in Brazil the following year.

T. J. Clark was born in Bristol, England in 1943, took a B.A. in Modern History at Cambridge, and a Ph.D. in Art History at the Courtauld Institute, University of London.  He taught at various places in Britain and the USA, and from 1988 to the present at the University of California, Berkeley, where he is now George C. and Helen N. Pardee Chair Emeritus.  Clark is the author of a series of books on the social character and formal dynamics of modern art: The Absolute Bourgeois: Artists and Politics in France 1848-1851 (1973); Image of the People: Gustave Courbet and the 1848 Revolution (1973); The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers (1984); and Farewell to an Idea: Episodes from a History of Modernism (1999); as well as Afflicted Powers: Capital and Spectacle in a New Age of War (written with ‘Retort’, 2005); The Sight of Death: An Experiment in Art Writing (2006); and Picasso and Truth: From Cubism to Guernica (2013).  In 2013 he co-authored (with Anne M. Wagner) Lowry and the Painting of Modern Life, a book accompanying an exhibition at Tate Britain.  A book-cum-pamphlet on the present state of Left politics, Por uma esquerda sem futuro, was published in Brazil, also in 2013.  For the past several years he has written art criticism regularly for the London Review of Books.  He is completing a book entitled Heaven on Earth: Bruegel, Giotto, Poussin, Veronese; and, as visiting scholar at the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles, is working on another called The Thing in Itself: Essays on Cézanne.

Masterclass 1 – Wednesday 1 June 2016

AUDIO HERE

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Masterclass 2 – Thursday 2 June 2016

AUDIO HERE

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Masterclass 3 – Monday 6 June 2016

AUDIO HERE

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Precarious Citizenship: Young People Who are Undocumented, Separated and Settled in the UK

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on June 1st, 2016

 

Event Date: 1 June 2016

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7JL

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities in association with the Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit (MiCLU) presents:

Precarious Citizenship: Young People Who are Undocumented, Separated and Settled in the UK

A one-day conference for academics, practitioners and activists interested in how precarious citizenship impacts on separated youth as they live and transition to adulthood in the UK.

Significant numbers of young people who are settled in the UK (some 120,000) do not have British citizenship. Many have no ‘lawful’ status to remain in the UK whilst cuts to legal aid and fast-paced changes to immigration laws fuelled by a hostile anti-immigrant climate mean that this trend may indeed get worse with numbers rising. Many of these young people may have lived in the UK for many years and consider themselves to be British. Indeed, they may not be aware of their precarious citizenship until they leave school and try to apply for bank accounts, jobs, benefits or university or when they are leaving care or following a family breakdown. Their precarious status arises from the combination of their transition out of childhood, which gave them a degree of protection or insulation from immigration laws, and the discriminatory character of immigration law that means for many of these young people, despite being settled in the UK for many years, once they reach adulthood they cannot secure their British citizenship.

The purpose of this conference is to increase awareness of the precarious citizenship of this group of young people in the UK; to share empirical and theoretical knowledge about contemporary and historical forms of precarious citizenship at the intersection of youth and immigration; to develop a network of academics and practitioners who can take forward the study of precarious citizenship in young people’s lives, and to contribute to theoretical and policy development focused on this group; to engage with activists on effective political mobilisation of youth.

Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit
The Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit (MiCLU), hosted by Islington Law Centre, is a specialist legal, policy and training hub aimed at upholding and improving the rights of young people.  MiCLU’s Responsibility Shared legal education programme aims to increase awareness of child rights law amongst professionals who work directly with migrant and refugee children and young people in the UK, with the aim of improving quality advice and support provision for this vulnerable group. Responsibility Shared will offer free workshops and events across the UK, as well as webinars and e-learning tools available to all.

Programme:

Introduction by Jennifer Ang (Associate Lecturer in Law The Open University in Scotland) – Undocumented, Separated and Settled in the UK

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Baljeet Sandhu & Anna Skehan (Migrant and Refugee Children’s Legal Unit , MiCLU, Islington Law Centre) – An Overview

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Session 1: Precariousness in a Global Context

Chair: Dr Elaine Chase (Senior Lecturer, University of London Institute of Education)

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•    Dr Nando Sigona (Deputy Director, Institute for Research into Superdiversity (IRiS)) -  State-induced vulnerabilities and experiences of precariousness among undocumented children and youth

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•    Lilana Keith (Advocacy Officer, Borders, Detention and Children with Platform for International Co-operation on Undocumented Migrants (PICUM)) -  Perspectives from Europe

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•    Dr Karen Wells (Reader, International Development & Childhood Studies, Birkbeck, University of London) – Perspectives from the US

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Session 2: Living with Precariousness: Young People Speak Out

Chair: Hannah Rushton (The Prince’s Trust)

Young people living with precariousness share their lived experiences through performances and presentations.

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Session 2: Living with Precariousness: Health and Education

Chair: Dr Matthew Hodes (Senior Lecturer in Child & Adolescent Psychiatry, Imperial College London)

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•    Sheila Melzak (Consultant Child and Adolescent Psychotherapist, Clinical Director, Baobab Centre for Young Survivors in Exile) – Impact of precariousness on young people’s mental health

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•    Anna Miller (Right to Care Project Lead, Doctors of the World)-  Healthcare for migrant children: addressing barriers through policy and advocacy work

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•    Catherine Gladwell (Founder and Director, Refugee Support Network) -  Impact of precariousness on education: access, retention and barriers

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Session 2: Living with Precariousness: Young People and Transitions to Adulthood

Chair: Karen Goodman (Professional Officer, British Association of Social Workers)

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•    Hannah Rushton (Outreach Manager, The Prince’s Trust) – From governing the child to governing the migrant: the experiences of separated and settled undocumented youth in the UK

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•   Yesim Deveci (Senior Lecturer, University of East London) – ‘No papers:’ the hope and dreams, everyday lives and life histories of young people living with irregular immigration status in the UK

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•    Dr Ala Sirriyeh (Lecturer in Sociology, Keele University) – Foster care and transitions to adulthood for unaccompanied asylum seeking young people

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•    Tom Freegard (Senior Advice Officer, Centrepoint) – Homelessness: the experiences of undocumented youth

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Session 3: Addressing the Legal and Protection Needs of Precarious Citizenship

Chair: Kathryn Cronin (Head of Chambers, Garden Court Chambers)

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•    Anna Skehan (MiCLU, Islington Law Centre) – Challenges in becoming a British citizen

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•    Frances Trevena (Head of Policy and Programmes, Coram Children’s Legal Centre) – Growing Up in a Hostile Environment: Legal and policy challenges

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•    Ilona Pinter & Helen Connelly (The Children’s Society) – Cut Off from Justice: Access and barriers to legal aid

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Panel questions:

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Film: Brighter Futures London

Introduction to the Brighter Futures video:

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Session 4: Building a Migrant Rights Movement and Connections with Anti-racism

Chair: Dr Parvathi Raman (Chair, Centre for Migration and Diaspora Studies, SOAS, University of London)

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•    Liz Fekete (Director, Institute of Race Relations (IRR))

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•    Dr Karen Wells (Reader, International Development & Childhood Studies, Birkbeck, University of London) -  Lessons from the US (DREAMERS)

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•    Agnes, Sharon, Arkam & Chrisann (Let Us Learn, hosted by Just for Kids Law) – Why we must focus on engaging and mobilising young leaders with lived experience

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•    Farzana Khan (Platform London, SHAKE! Young Voices in Arts, Media, Race & Power)  – Speak Out and Act Up!

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Summary and Close

•  Frances Webber (Vice-Chair of the Institute of Race Relations (IRR)) -  Reflections on the day

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Final Discussion:

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William Lubenow – West to East/East to West

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 1st, 2016

Event Date: 1 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor William Lubenow (Stockton University, USA) – West to East/East to West: The Royal Asiatic Society and Western Knowledge of Asia

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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Celia Washington – The Kathmandu Contemporary Arts Centre

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 26th, 2016

Event Date: 26 May 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Celia WashingtonThe Kathmandu Contemporary Arts Centre

Celia Washington is a practicing artist based between London and Kathmandu. After a nomadic childhood, she studied painting at the Byam Shaw Art School in London 1977 – 81. Since then she has lived in Florence, Edinburgh, Paris, Tokyo, Madrid London and Kathmandu – painting, printing and searching. In 2006 she became Artist in Residence at Kathmandu University. In 2007 she set up the British Charity Kathmandu Contemporary Arts Centre.

“In 2006 I spent seven months as artist in residence at Kathmandu University. I was impressed by the creativity and determination of a newer, younger generation of artists despite their dificulties and felt their voice deserved to be heard by the outside world. I wanted to help and began collecting books to expand the University Art Library.
UK friends generously donated over 800 books which, with the support of the British Council, arrived in Nepal in October 2006. Over the next few months in discussion with Napali artists the proposal for the KCAC began to evolve. Then I met Sangeeta Thapa, of the Siddhartha Art Gallery, Kathmandu and we discovered that we shared the same vision. I am excited to be involved with her on such an extraordinary and ground-breaking project.”

Introduction by Dr Alison Otha (Drector, RAS):

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