New Drug Seminars – New Drugs and Risk

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 5th, 2016

Event Date: 5 February 2016
Canada Room, Lanyon Building,
Queen’s University Belfast
University Road
Belfast, BT7 1NN

 

University of Kent presents:

New Drug Seminars

Seminar 5: New Drugs and Risk

The fifth seminar in this series focuses on Novel Psychoactive Substances and risk. The many unknowns around some of these newer drugs pose multiple risks to individuals using new psychoactive substances, including physical health risks, psychological health risks, social risk, legal risk and economic risk. This seminar offers a range of views on NPS and risk and encompasses perspectives from international research, policy, primary care, service provision and service users.

Speakers include: Professor Karen McElrath (University of Fayetteville, North Carolina, USA), Niamh Eastwood (Release), representative from Belfast Experts By Experience (NI based Drug Advocacy Group), representative from Emergency Medicine, Representative from Psychiatry.

Programme:

Welcome and Introduction by Dr Nina O’Neill and Dr. Anne Campbell (Queen’s University Belfast):

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NPS & Risk: Research, Policy & Practice

Prof. Karen McElrath (University of Fayetteville):

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Niamh Eastwood (Release):

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Dr. Anne Campbell (Queen’s University Belfast):

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Dr Aisling Diamond (Consultant A&E Belfast HSCT):

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NPS & Risk: PhD & Masters Research

Ashley Bullard (University of Leeds):

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Larissa Sherwood (Queen’s University Belfast):

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NPS & Risk: Service Provision

Fiona Anderson (Start360):

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Prof. Tony O’Neill (Queen’s University Belfast):

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NPS & Risk: Expert Views from Participants

not recorded (confidentiality issues)

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‘Pink slave’ or the Modern Young Woman? Au Pairing in the UK from the 19th Century to the Present

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 5th, 2016

Event Date: 5 February 2016
Room G02
28 Russell Square,
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1B 5DQ

Birkbeck Gender Studies (BiGS) in collaboration with the Raphael Samuel History Centre presents:

‘Pink slave’ or the Modern Young Woman? Au Pairing in the UK from the 19th Century to the Present

Speakers:              Dr Eleni Liarou (Birkbeck) and Dr Rosie Cox (Birkbeck)

In this event the speakers will discuss how the au pair scheme developed in the UK from the late 19th century, the reasons for its popularity in the 20th century, and how au pairing has developed since the 1990s. They will also outline how the history of the au pair sheds light on a history of controlling sexual morality within Britain’s changing attitudes to sexuality, class and ethnicity.

Talk:

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Marie-Helene Brousse – The Symbolic and the Body

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 4th, 2016

 

Event Date: 4 February 2016
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The MA Psychoanalysis at Kingston University, and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

The Speaking Body is Today’s Unconscious

Psychoanalysis on the 21st Century

Seminar 2:

Marie-Helene BrousseThe Symbolic and the Body

Welcome by Christopher Kul-Want (CSM):

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Introductory comments by Alan Rowan (Secretary of the London Society NLS):

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Introduction by Véronique Voruz (Dept. Psychoanalysis, Kingston University, London):

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Talk:

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Miguel de Beistegui – The Government of Desire: a Genealogical Perspective

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 4th, 2016

 

Event Date: 4 February 2016
Room JG3002
John Galsworthy Building
Penrhyn Road Campus,
Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Miguel de Beistegui (University of Warwick)  – The Government of Desire: a Genealogical Perspective

Introduction By Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Nicola Mai – Assembling Samira & Travel: queering sexual humanitarianism through experimental ethnographic filmmaking

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 3rd, 2016

 

Event Date: 3 February 2016
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The MA Gender without Borders at Kingston University, and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Professor Nicola Mai (Kingston University, Migration & Social Cohesion in the UK) – Assembling Samira & Travel: queering sexual humanitarianism through experimental ethnographic filmmaking

Introduction by Professor Tina Chanter (Kingston):

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Sara Upstone – Beyond the Bedroom: the violence of motherhood in EL James’ 50 Shades of Grey trilogy

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 28th, 2016

 

Event Date: 28 January 2016
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The MA Gender without Borders at Kingston University, and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Dr Sara Upstone (Kingston) – Beyond the Bedroom: the violence of motherhood in EL James’ 50 Shades of Grey trilogy

Introduction by Professor Tina Chanter (Kingston):

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David Johnson – Beauty and the Blind: There’s far more to seeing than enters the eyeball

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 27th, 2016

Event Date: 27 January 2016

Room WIN005
Windsor Building

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

David Johnson (Visual Artist) – Beauty and the Blind: There’s far more to seeing than enters the eyeball

    In this presentation David will talk about his piece ‘Too Big to Feel’ and more generally about his art. The talk will focus on the irony of how blindness can give us insights into the big questions concerning the nature of things and our knowledge of those things, and how art can be a very powerful and effective tool in communicating these insights. In important ways the blind experience of the world, rather than being alien and alienating, is in fact, parallel and analogous to the sighted experience of the world. As a society we marginalise, trivialise and ignore these insights at our cost.

The piece ‘Too Big to Feel’, located on Royal Holloway’s main campus, is braille that is too big for most blind braille readers to understand and too encrypted for sighted non-braille readers to understand. So the meaning of the braille words is obscure to nearly everyone, suggesting thus that meaning is obscure and that we should be humble when claiming knowledge.

Participants will be able to join in the creation of a collaborative art work during the seminar.

Welcome by Dr Giuliana Pieri (Head of School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, RHUL):

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Introduction by Dr Hannah Thompson (French, SMLLC, RHUL):

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Talk:

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Paul Salmons – Why do we continue to ignore the Holocaust?

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 26th, 2016

Event Date: 26 January 2016

Windsor Auditorium

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

David Cesarani Holocaust Memorial Lecture

Paul Salmons  (Programme Director UCL Centre for Holocaust Education, University College London) – Why do we continue to ignore the Holocaust?

As Britain prepares for its national Holocaust Memorial Day, it may seem perverse to ask the question ‘Why do we continue to ignore the Holocaust?’ Especially as it has held a place on our national curriculum for some quarter of a century and a cursory look at the films, novels, art and media of the last few decades could lead some to claim that our culture has been saturated by the Holocaust. And yet, despite all of these cultural representations, despite the hundreds of commemorative events across the country and the thousands of classroom lessons devoted to this subject, new national research indicates a surprising lack of knowledge and understanding about the Holocaust among secondary school students. Rather than blame schools, teachers and students, Salmons and his colleagues at the UCL Centre for Holocaust Education believe that this research reveals myths and misconceptions that lie at the heart of a story Britain has told itself about the Holocaust. A story that has focused too much on the ‘lessons of the Holocaust’ without really exploring what the Holocaust actually was, or why and how it happened. And so, as Britain now considers how to fulfil the ‘promise to remember’ made by the Prime Minister’s Holocaust Commission, perhaps this is the time to question how it is possible for there to be so much memory of a past that is so little understood, and to consider how secure is memory without knowledge and understanding?

NB: Due to a technical failure at the Windsor auditorium we cannot bring you the welcoming words by Professor Katie Normington (RHUL Vice Principal (Staffing) and Dean of Arts and Social Science) and the introductory comments by Professor Dan Stone (RHUL).

Lecture:

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James Wilson – Internal and External Validity in Thought Experiments

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 25th, 2016

Event Date: 25 January 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr James Wilson (UCL) – Internal and External Validity in Thought Experiments

James Wilson integrates philosophy with other relevant disciplines, such as epidemiology, economics and political theory to explore conceptual and practical challenges in the sustainable and equitable improvement of human well-being. He focuses particularly on public health ethics, and the ownership and governance of ideas and information. He received his PhD from UCL in 2002, then held temporary lectureships in Philosophy at University of Roehampton (2002-3) and Birkbeck (2003-4), before becoming Lecturer in Ethics at the Keele University (2004-8). He has been at UCL since 2008, first as Lecturer in Philosophy and Health, and then as Senior Lecturer in Philosophy.

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Desert Island Pics: Olivia Arthur

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 23rd, 2016

Event Date: 23 January 2016
London Art Fair
Business Design Centre
London N1 0QH

 

photoworks presents:

Desert Island Pics: Olivia Arthur

Olivia Arthur has been a member of Magnum Photos since 2013. Having worked extensively on women’s issues throughout Eastern Europe, Iran, Turkey and North Africa, her much celebrated first book Jeddah Diary (2012) opened up the paradoxical world of young women in Saudi Arabia.

Desert Island Pics is an ongoing series of Photoworks talks loosely based on the format of  BBC Radio 4’s Desert Island Discs. For LAF16, Olivia will reveal her choice of eight photographs and discuss how they reflect her life and career with our regular Desert Island Pics host Stephen Bull.

Previous Desert Island Pics castaways include Martin Parr, Alison Jackson, Simon Roberts and Jeremy Deller.

Olivia Arthur (b1980) was awarded The Guardian’s 2001 Student Photographer of the Year while she was studying Maths at Oxford University. A photography diploma from London College of Printing (now LCC) followed in 2003.

She began working as a photographer in 2003 after moving to Delhi and was based in India for two and a half years.

In 2006 she left for Italy to take up a one-year residency with Fabrica, during which she began working on a series about women and the East-West cultural divide. This work has taken her to the border between Europe and Asia, Iran and Saudi Arabia. She has recieved support from the Inge Morath Award, the National Media Museum, OjodePez-PhotoEspana Award for Human Values.

In 2010 she co-founded Fishbar, a space for photography in London with Philipp Ebeling.

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