Voices and Books 1500-1800 Public Workshop 3

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on November 11th, 2014

                                               

Tuesday 11 November, 2014
The Conference Centre
British Library,
96 Euston Rd,
London NW1 2DB

Newcastle University  present:

Voices and Books 1500-1800

Public Workshop 3

An AHRC-funded Public Workshop

Convenor: Dr Arnold Hunt

How did people read aloud in the past? How do we do that now? And why does it matter that we recover and reflect on this experience? At this workshop we will discuss the many different ways in which the experience of listening to books, past and present, can be recorded and analysed, and the archives we might use, from the British Library’s Sound Archive to The Reading Experience Database. We will also hear and talk with the award-winning poet and radio broadcaster, Professor Sean O’Brien, about writing for listeners.

Programme:

Introduction by Professor Jennifer Richards (Newcastle):

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Professor Chris Reid (QMUL) – Parliamentary Voices: Speaking and Reporting in the House of Commons, 1750-1800

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Dr Arnold Hunt (British Library) – Reading sermons aloud, 1600-1900

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Professor Barbara Ravelhofer (Durham) – Speech and Style in Early Modern Drama: lessons from the Shirley Project

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Dr Josie Billington (Liverpool) – Shared Reading Aloud in Contemporary Practice: The Reader Project

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Dr Shafquat Towheed (Open University) – Recovering readers and listeners 1500-1800 for The Reading Experience Database

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Professor  Sean O’Brien (Newcastle) reads a selection of his poetry and answer questions about the practice of reading poetry aloud

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Slavoj Zizek – Towards a Materialist Notion of Freedom: Neurosciences and Freedom

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 11th, 2014


Event Date: 11 November 2014

Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Slavoj Zizek – Towards a Materialist Notion of Freedom

2 Lectures

Lecture 2 – Neurosciences and Freedom 

Talk:

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Louise Johnson – Glamour in the Changing Room: Eduardo Mendicutti and the ‘Beckham Effect’

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 10th, 2014

Event Date: 10 November 2014

Main Lecture Theatre (MLT),
Founder’s Building,
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

The 2014 David Vilaseca Memorial Lecture

Dr Louise Johnson (Sheffield) – Glamour in the Changing Room: Eduardo Mendicutti and the ‘Beckham Effect’

This lecture considers Spanish novelist and journalist Eduardo Mendicutti’s high camp fictional foray behind the scenes at Real Madrid, in possibly one of the queerest takes on football fandom and homophobia ever published: La Susi en el vestuario blanco (2003). Mendicutti’s satirical blurring of the boundaries between spectators and players for the purpose of heightened mutual identification (and crass commercial gain), teases at the ‘rancid myths’ of football masculinities and attempts to create new ones. The lecture questions whether this shameless and ebullient work in its particular mode of mocking might have more to say to the football establishment, and to society as a whole, compared with more high-brow approaches to intractable prejudice.

Introduction by Professor Katie Normington (Vice Principal (Staffing) and Dean of Arts and Social Science, RHUL):

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Lecture:

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Vote of Thanks by Dr Sarah Wright (RHUL):

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Slavoj Zizek – Towards a Materialist Notion of Freedom: Freedom – for whom? To do what?

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 10th, 2014


Event Date: 10 November 2014

Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Slavoj Zizek – Towards a Materialist Notion of Freedom

2 Lectures

Lecture 1 – Freedom – for whom? To do what?

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3 Comments

Katy Hamilton – The radical gap between words and action: Singing Shakespeare

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 6th, 2014

                                                  

Event Date: 6 November 2014
Coombehurst Studio,
Kingston Hill
Kingston, KT2 7LB

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Dr Katy HamiltonThe radical gap between words and action: Singing Shakespeare

Introduction by Dr Helen Julia Minors (Kingston):

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Talk:

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Riccardo Bellofiore/Tommaso Redolfi Riva – Die Neue Marx-Lektüre: putting the critique of political economy back into the critique of society

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 6th, 2014

 

Event Date: 6 November 2014
Swedenborg Hall,
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London WC1A 2TH

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University presents:

Professor Riccardo Bellofiore (University of Bergamo) and Tommaso Redolfi Riva – Die Neue Marx-Lektüre: putting the critique of political economy back into the critique of society

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (CRMEP):

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Tommaso Redolfi Riva:

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Professor Riccardo Bellofiore (University of Bergamo):

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Audience Questions:

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Who Will Win in 2015? Pollster Peter Kellner in conversation with Tony Wright

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 5th, 2014

Event Date: 5 November 2014
Keynes Library
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life presents:

Who Will Win in 2015? Pollster Peter Kellner in conversation with Tony Wright

As we approach the most uncertain election in modern times, who will get the keys to Number 10?

Birkbeck and the Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life have an audience with Peter Kellner, the expert pollster and President of YouGov. Peter, who correctly predicted the Scottish referendum result and the Clacton by-election, will talk about who is likely to win, who is likely to lose and what the UKIP factor means for the General Election and the future of British politics.

Peter Kellner is President of YouGov. He was previously a journalist and political commentator for the Sunday Times, Independent, New Statesman, Evening Standard, BBC Newsnight, BBC election programmes and Channel 4 News. To read some of Peter’s recent articles here and his biography here.

Peter will be in conversation with Tony Wright. As an MP between 1992 and 2010, Tony chaired the Select Committee on Public Administration for over a decade; and also chaired the Select Committee on Reform of the House of Commons. He is now a Professorial Fellow in the Department of Politics at Birkbeck, University of London.

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Miri Rubin – A Life, a Death, a Legacy: Writing the History of Ritual Murder

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 3rd, 2014

Event Date: 3 November 2014
Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building,
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet St
London, WC1E 7HX

 

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism presents:

Professor Miri Rubin (QMUL) – A Life, a Death, a Legacy: Writing the History of Ritual Murder

The Life and Passion of William of Norwich, written in the twelfth century by Thomas of Monmouth a Benedictine monk, contains the earliest accusation that Jews killed a Christian child for hate of Christians and their beliefs. Such accusations were repeated over the centuries, in Europe and beyond. Believed by some and dismissed by others, they sometimes led to violence.

Miri Rubin’s lecture demonstrates the involvement of scholars and monks, bureaucrats and opportunists in attempts to make the accusation work. The story of child murder – first told in Norwich around 1150 – is as revealing about Christians as it is about Jews, both in the Middle Ages and since.

Miri Rubin is Professor of Medieval and Early Modern History at Queen Mary, University of London. She regularly appears on radio and television. Professor Rubin’s research interests lie in the study of the religious culture of Europe from 1100-1600. Her books include: Corpus Christi: the Eucharist in Late Medieval Culture (Cambridge University Press, 1991); and Gentile Tales; the Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews (Yale University Press, 1999; reprinted, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2004).

Introduction by Professor David Feldman (Director, Pears Institute):

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Talk:

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John Heil – Aristotelian Supervenience

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 3rd, 2014

Event Date: 3 November 2014
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor John Heil (WU, St Louis) - Aristotelian Supervenience

John Heil is professor of philosophy at Washington University in St Louis and Honorary Research Associate at Monash University. His work centers on topics in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind. He is interested in the extent to which medieval and early modern approaches to metaphysical issues might shed light on contemporary debates over the nature of substances, properties, and relations (especially causal relations), and truthmakers for modal truths. Many of these themes are addressed in his most recent book, The Universe as We Find It (Oxford, 2012).

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Michel Rosenfeld – Constitutionalism, Globalisation and Ethno-religious Conflict

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 31st, 2014

Event Date: 31 October 2014
Room B35
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

Birkbeck School of Law presents:

Leverhulme Lecture I

Professor Michel Rosenfeld (Cardozo School of Law, New York) – Constitutionalism, Globalisation and Ethno-religious Conflict

Enlightenment-based constitutions, such as the American and the French, tend to downplay ethno-cultural and religious differences by stressing individualism over group affiliation and by relegating religion to the private sphere. Today, mass migration, religious revival, globalization and supra-national governance exacerbate tensions and pose major challenges that call for inquiry regarding the continuing viability of a coherent constitutional order within and beyond the nation-state.   Discussants will be Drs. Stewart Motha and Marinos Diamantides from the Law School.

Michel Rosenfeld is Professor of Human Rights and director of the Program on Global and Comparative Constitutional Theory at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law, New York; and the co-editor (with Susanna Mancini) of Constitutional Secularism in an Age of Religious Revival, OUP (2014).

His visit to Birkbeck School of Law is courtesy of a grant from the Leverhulme Trust, whose support is gratefully acknowledged.

Introduction by Dr Marinos Diamantides (Birkbeck):

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Lecture:

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Responses by Dr.Marinos Diamantides and Dr Stewart Motha  and audience questions:

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