Margaret Bird – Inculcating an appreciation of time pressure in the young: the training of children for working life in 18th-century England

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 24th, 2015

Event Date: 24 March 2015

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Margaret Bird (RHUL) – Inculcating an appreciation of time pressure in the young: the training of children for working life in 18th-century England

The rearing of children has been a topic at the centre of academic debate since the Annales historian Philippe Ariès analysed le sentiment de l’enfance in 1960.
Margaret Bird’s exploration of the tensions between respecting children as individuals and the need to hurry them into maturity for working life relates to the mercantile and manufacturing class in England. Understanding time pressure, as in expecting six-year-olds to watch the clock, formed part of their moulding as useful members of society. Time-conscious capitalism and Calvinism lay behind much of the thinking. It draws in part on the newly published diary of Mary Hardy, wife of a farmer and manufacturer.

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Mark Gardner – Contemporary Antisemitism in Britain

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 23rd, 2015

 

Event Date: 23 March 2015
The Wiener Library
29 Russell Square
London WC1B 5DP

 

The Wiener Library presents:

Mark GardnerContemporary Antisemitism in Britain

Mark Gardner will discuss contemporary antisemitism, including developments from the 1990s to the present day and whether or not it is accurate to state that antisemitism is increasing. This will draw upon much of Mark’s own experience at CST, including the threat of antisemitic terrorism, the actuality of antisemitic race hate attack levels and the development of discourse against Jews and about Jewish issues.
Mark Gardner has worked full time for Community Security Trust (and its predecessor, Community Security Organisation) since 1989. Having been Director of Research, he is now Director of Communications and Deputy Director of Operations: positions he has held since 2005.
As Director of Communications, Mark plays a lead role in co-ordinating UK Jewish media and political responses on CST’s core issues of antisemitism, policing, security and terrorism. He is frequently quoted in Jewish, UK and international media; and speaks regularly at public meetings and conferences on these subjects.
Mark has represented CST and the Jewish community to Government and international bodies on numerous occasions, including the 2006 Parliamentary Inquiry into Antisemitism, and various European Union committees and anti-racism research projects. He was awarded a Metropolitan Police commendation for his advisory role on behalf of all London’s minority communities during the Nazi nail bombing campaign of 1999.
Mark has authored many articles and CST reports on antisemitism, policing, security and terrorism.

Introduction by Professor Philip Spencer (Kingston):

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Postpolitics and Neoliberalism (London)

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2015

  

Event Date: 21 March 2015

Day 2 (London)
Room B01 Clore Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the School of Humanities at Canterbury Christ Church University present:

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism

Politics is dead, dying, or changing into something new. The word ‘ideology’ has become a term of abuse, associated especially with the ‘utopian’ old left. Commitment and belief have become ‘tribalism’ and ‘dogma’. Technocracy, pragmatism, and single-issue campaigns are the order of the day. As the public tune out and turn away, politicians perform increasingly desperate acts of self-abasement. Anti-Westminster mavericks are on the rise. Everywhere there are calls to shrink the state.Yet a politics that exists outside the theatre of the state has yet to be imagined.

As the 2015 election fast approaches, this conference will explore the ideological, cultural, linguistic and historical dimensions of the contemporary postpolitical moment, and its relationship to neoliberalism. With participants drawn from academic, writing, and campaigning backgrounds, the conference will bring together a range of approaches in order to grasp the enduring subtext of the all-consuming and all-erasing daily news churn.

Programme:

Day 2 (London)

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Welcome

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Session One: Hegemony, consent and resistance

Costas Douzinas (Birkbeck) – Radical philosophy reads the age of resistance

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Jeremy Gilbert (East London) – Hegemony and Consent in a post-political age

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Chair: Iain MacKenzie (Kent)

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Session Two: Post-political politics

Nina Power (Roehampton) – The Post-Political = The Most Political

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Ben Little (Middlesex) – The meaning of Russell Brand

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Chair: Andre Barrinha (CCCU)

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Session Three: British politics at the crossroads

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Ideology, authority and populism

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John Crace (Guardian) – Why Politicians lie

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Chair: Marissia Fragkou (CCCU)

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Keynote Lecture: Chantal Mouffe (Westminster) – The future of democracy in a post-political age

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Chair: Nina Power  (Roehampton)

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Concluding panel discussion: Esther Leslie, Chantal MouffeZoe Wiliams, Nina Power, Costas Douzinas

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Chair: Eliane Glaser

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Drinks – all welcome

Afterword: Zoe Wiliams:

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<<Day 1 of the ‘Postpolitics and Neoliberalism’ conference was held at Canterbury Christ Church University of London and is available to listen to here>>

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Postpolitics and Neoliberalism (Canterbury)

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 20th, 2015

Event Date: 20  March 2015

Day one (Canterbury)
Ng03 Lecture Theatre
Newton Building
Canterbury Christ Church University
North Holmes Road Campus
Canterbury CT1 1QU

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities and the School of Humanities at Canterbury Christ Church University present:

Postpolitics and Neoliberalism

Politics is dead, dying, or changing into something new. The word ‘ideology’ has become a term of abuse, associated especially with the ‘utopian’ old left. Commitment and belief have become ‘tribalism’ and ‘dogma’. Technocracy, pragmatism, and single-issue campaigns are the order of the day. As the public tune out and turn away, politicians perform increasingly desperate acts of self-abasement. Anti-Westminster mavericks are on the rise. Everywhere there are calls to shrink the state.Yet a politics that exists outside the theatre of the state has yet to be imagined.

As the 2015 election fast approaches, this conference will explore the ideological, cultural, linguistic and historical dimensions of the contemporary postpolitical moment, and its relationship to neoliberalism. With participants drawn from academic, writing, and campaigning backgrounds, the conference will bring together a range of approaches in order to grasp the enduring subtext of the all-consuming and all-erasing daily news churn.

Programme:

Day one (Canterbury)

Eliane Glaser (CCCU and Birkbeck) – Welcome

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Keynote Lecture – Erik Swyngedouw (Manchester) – Insurgent Cities: Post-Politicization and the Spectral Return of the Political
Chair: Eliane Glaser

AUDIO HERE

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Session One: Paradigms and the imagination

Neal Lawson (Compass) – Politics for and by the people

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Andrew Simms (New Economics Foundation) – Paradigm shift or bust

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Chair: Jim Butcher (CCCU)

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1200-1300 – Session Two: Democracy and emancipation

David Bates (CCCU) – ”The Political” and Emancipatory Politics – Reflections on Laclau and Mouffe

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Lars Cornelissen (Brighton) – Rethinking neoliberal de-democratisation

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Chair: Darren Ambrose

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Session Three: Rereading the ideologically ‘neutral’: urban planning, education, and cyber-security

Owen Hatherley (writer) – A Bit Of Development Is Always Good’: Planning, politics, indifference and boosterism in the British city

AUDIO HERE

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Chris Carpenter (CCCU) – To what extent is Educational policy under the coalition government (2010-present) ideologically ‘neutral’?

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Andre Barrinha (CCCU) – Ideology, neoliberalism and cyber security

AUDIO HERE

Chair:  Bojan Koltaj (CCCU)

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Session Four: Morals, ethics and theology

Jim Butcher (CCCU) – Care, responsibility and the politics of ethical lifestyle

AUDIO HERE

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Joe Bennett (Birmingham) – The politics of moral talk

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Bojan Koltaj (CCCU) – Can Theology Really Redeem Politics?

AUDIO HERE

Chair: David Bates

<<Day 2 of the ‘Postpolitics and Neoliberalism’ conference was held at Birkbeck University of London and is available to listen to here>>

 

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Claudia Olk – Beckett’s Shakespearean Echoes

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 19th, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 19 March 2015
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Claudia Olk (Berlin Free University) – Beckett’s Shakespearean Echoes

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Greece and Europe: A First Account of a Radical Government

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2015


Event Date: 18 March 2015

Room B01
Clore Management Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Greece and Europe: A First Account of a Radical Government

Speakers:  Costas Douzinas Paul Mason (Channel 4 News) &  Slavoj Zizek

This roundtable discussion will begin with a screening of a 15 minute film made by Paul Mason: Greece: The End of Austerity?

Introduction by Maria Aristodemou (Birkbeck):

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Film:

GREECE: THE END OF AUSTERITY?

Talk (order of speakers: Costas Douzinas, Slavoj Zizek, Paul Mason):

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Emily West – The dual exploitation of enslaved women in America, c.1815-1865

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2015

Event Date: 18 March 2015
Moore Management Building
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Bedford Centre for the History of Women presents:

2015 Bedford Lecture

Dr Emily West (Reading) – The dual exploitation of enslaved women in America, c.1815-1865

This lecture provides an overview of the lives of enslaved women in America from the colonial era through to emancipation in 1865. It focuses on slaveholders’ dual exploitation of female slaves as workers and as reproducers, and the ‘double day’ of enslaved women who laboured both for their owners and for their families. Wet nursing will be used as a case study to shed light on different forms of exploitation directed against enslaved women. Dr Emily West will consider the legacies of female slavery in the struggle for gender equality in a more contemporary context.

Introduction by Dr Stella Moss (RHUL):

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Peter Hennessy – Meritocracy and the Establishment

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2015

Event Date: 18 March 2015
Main Lecture Theatre Founder’s Building
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Royal Holloway Department of English as part of the Runnymede Literary Festival presents:

Professor Peter Hennessy (QMUL) – Meritocracy and the Establishment

As part of our Magna Carta season of events, we’re pleased to welcome Professor Peter Hennessy, Baron Hennessy of Nymphsfield and Attlee Profesor of Contemporary British History at Queen Mary’s, University of London. Don’t miss this chance to hear one of the country’s foremost specialists in contemporary British history discuss ideas of ‘meritocracy and the establishment’.

Part of our Runnymede Festival lectures: Magna Carta series

Introduction by Professor Robert Hampson (RHUL):

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Aisa Martinez – Omani Costumes

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 17th, 2015

Event Date: 17 March 2015
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Aisa Martinez (British Museum) – Omani Costumes

‘Dress studies’ is a relatively new academic field whose major theories and case studies emerged in the late 1970s and early 1980s. Joanne Eicher, one of the earliest scholars, states that clothing and dress are part of a complex system of symbols and meaning. Kuchler and Miller (2005) argue that clothing is a living part of culture and society, expanding upon Appadurai’s ‘social life of things’ (1988). The lecture will explore how regional styles of Omani dress reveal the individual wearer’s age, wealth, socio-economic status, and religious or ethnic affiliation. Elements and details in a garment’s shape, colour, use or non-use of certain embellishments and materials, go beyond the individual wearer and serve as evidence of trade routes and commodities integral in Oman’s place within the western Indian Ocean trade network.

Aisa Martinez began her journey in studying dress and adornment in the Arabian Peninsula in 2007 during a Fulbright research fellowship in Muscat, Oman. She volunteered with the Centre for Omani dress, cataloguing a growing dress collection of pieces from nearly every corner of the Sultanate of Oman. She completed her MA in social anthropology in 2010 at SOAS, focusing her studies on Omani men’s national dress and national identity. She also helped organize the British Museum’s 2011 display on Omani silver jewellery and costume. From late 2011 until early 2014, she was a research fellow with the London Middle East Institute at SOAS, focusing on embroidery and embellishment in Saudi women’s dress. During this time, she spent three months doing fieldwork and travelling around Saudi Arabia. She is currently a project curator with the ZNM Project at the British Museum.

Introduction by Sami de Giosa (RAS):

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George Manginis – The Benaki Museum Chinese Art Collection Resurrected

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 17th, 2015

Event Date: 17 March 2015
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Dr George Manginis (SOAS) – The Benaki Museum Chinese Art Collection Resurrected – Strategies for making visible the invisible

The 1,300-item-strong Benaki Museum Chinese Art Collection, largely donated by George Eumorfopoulos between 1927 and 1936, went into storage in 1990 and has remained there since. The lecture will present a few of the most interesting items in the collection, will trace the fifteen-year-long effort to raise awareness on it and will examine its future prospects within a shifting political and cultural landscape.

George Manginis studied archaeology and history of art at the University of Athens. He read Islamic architecture and Chinese ceramics as part of his MA at SOAS, where he was also awarded a doctoral title for a thesis on Jabal Musa, Egypt. He has participated in archaeological excavations around Europe and in Egypt and has contributed articles in scholarly magazines and exhibition catalogues in Greece, Cyprus, the United Kingdom and Korea. He recently completed the web catalogue of the collection of Chinese ceramics at the Benaki Museum in Athens. He lectures regularly on Islamic, Chinese and Byzantine art at SOAS, the British Museum, the Victoria and Albert Museum and other educational institutions and learned societies.

Introduction by Sami de Giosa (RAS):

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