Ilker Evrim Binbas – Intellectual Networks in Timurid Iran

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 29th, 2016

Event Date: 13 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

BOOK LAUNCH

Dr Ilker Evrim Binbas (RHUL) – Intellectual Networks in Timurid Iran

By focusing on the works and intellectual network of the Timurid historian Sharaf al Dīn ‘Alī Yazdī (d.1454), this book presents a holistic view of intellectual life in fifteenth century Iran. İlker Evrim Binbaş argues that the intellectuals in this period formed informal networks which transcended political and linguistic boundaries, and spanned an area from the western fringes of the Ottoman State to bustling late medieval metropolises such as Cairo, Shiraz, and Samarkand. The network included an Ottoman revolutionary, a Mamluk prophet, and a Timurid occultist, as well as physicians, astronomers, devotees of the secret sciences, and those political figures who believed that the network was a force to be taken seriously. Also discussing the formation of an early modern Islamicate republic of letters, this book offers fresh insights on the study of intellectual history beyond the limitations imposed by nationalist methodologies, established genres, and recognized literary traditions.

Dr Ilker Evrim Binbas is lecturer in Early Modern Asian Empires at Royal Holloway University of London.

Introduction by Professor Francis Robinson (Vice-President, RAS):

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Protecting and Offending Jews: Speech, Law and Policy

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 28th, 2016

 

Event Date: 28 June 2016
Jubilee Room
Westminster Hall,
House of Commons
London SW1A 0AA

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism Birkbeck, University of London in partnership with the All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism presents:

Protecting and Offending Jews: Speech, Law and Policy

PROGRAMME

Introduction

John Mann MP, Chair, All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

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David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

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Session 1: Giving and Taking Offence

Rowan Williams, Master of Magdalene College, Cambridge

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Session 2: Zones of Controversy – Social Media and BDS

Brendan McGeever, Birkbeck, University of London

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Paul Iganski, Lancaster University

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Session 3: Race, Religion and the Law

Rebecca Hilsenrath, Chief Executive, Equality and Human Rights Commission

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Omar Khan, Director, Runnymede Trust

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Concluding Remarks

David Feldman, Director, Pears Institute for the study of Antisemitism, Birkbeck, University of London

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The Challenge of Climate Change: What Can and Can’t Be Fixed?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 28th, 2016

Event Date: 28 June 2016
Birkbeck, University of London
Room 101
30 Russell Square,
30 Russell Square, London, WC1B 5DQ
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for Social Research  presents:

The Challenge of Climate Change: What Can and Can’t Be Fixed?

A Roundtable discussion and reception launching the MSc in Global Environmental Politics and Policy, organised by the Birkbeck Population, Environment and Resources Group.

As we approach the 25th anniversary of the Rio Earth Summit in 2017, climate change continues to pose a formidable global socio-economic, political and environmental challenge. The latest Conference of Participants in Paris culminated with a multilateral commitment to keep global temperature rise this century below 2 degrees Celsius, promising an agreement with a ‘long-term vision’ that was also to act as an ‘engine of safe growth’.

In this panel, we consider whether these aspirations to reconcile economic growth with control over global warming are realistic, feasible or even desirable. What are the prospects of enforcing these objectives? What kind of policies and political mobilisations might help to secure them? Can and does technology help in addressing climate change? And what are the implications of all this for an  increasingly ‘crowded, complex and coastal’ planet? Four specialists on these subjects will discuss these and other related questions in an accessible and conversational format.

Panelists:

Aideen Foley, Lecturer in Physical and Environmental Geography Birkbeck College.
Diane Horn, Reader in Coastal Geomorphology Birkbeck College.
Eric Kaufmann, Professor of Politics, Birkbeck College.
Nick Srnicek, co-author of Inventing the Future.

Chair: Alex Colás, Reader in International Relations, Birkbeck College

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Hillel Kieval – Blood Inscriptions: Science, Modernity, and Ritual Murder in Fin de Siècle Europe

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 28th, 2016

Event Date: 28 June 2016
Room B33
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism presents:

Professor Hillel Kieval (Washington University in St. Louis) – Blood Inscriptions: Science, Modernity, and Ritual Murder in Fin de Siècle Europe

When trials against Jews for the “ritual murder”of Christians reappeared in Central Europe in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century they seemed to be a throwback to the Middle Ages.  The truth is, however, that the modern trials were very different.  The “rules of the game” had changed: ritual murder accusations, and the criminal examinations that ensued, could no longer be framed in pre-Reformation language and symbols.  Prosecutors, magistrates, trial judges, and police investigators shared an implicit understanding that a new universe of knowledge was in place in which academic experts and practitioners of science defined the boundaries of plausible argument and were to be accorded deference.  This does not mean that traditional religious beliefs suddenly ceased to be disseminated or no longer influenced courtroom proceedings, but cultural traditions and psychological predispositions would no longer suffice. A new set of arguments and new appeals to authority were now needed to move states to indict or judges and juries to convict.

Hillel Kieval is Gloria M Goldstein Professor of Jewish History and Thought at Washington University in St Louis. His research focuses on transformations in Jewish culture and society in East Central Europe from the Enlightenment to the Second World War, including the effects of ethnic and national struggles, social conflict, and antisemitism on Jewish life and Jewish-Gentile relations. One area of particular interest is the function and phenomenology of the “ritual murder” trial in modern Europe.

Talk (with an introduction by Professor David Feldman):

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Michael Loewe – Problems of Han Administration

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 23rd, 2016

Event Date: 23 June 2016
Royal Asiatic Society
14 Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

BOOK LAUNCH

Professor Michael Loewe (Cambridge) – Problems of Han Administration

Michael Loewe calls on literary and material evidence to examine three problems that arose in administering China’s early empires. Religious rites due to an emperor’s predecessors must both pay the correct services to his ancestors and demonstrate his right to succeed to the throne. In practical terms, tax collectors, merchants, farmers and townsmen required the establishment of a standard set of weights and measures that was universally operative and which they could trust. Those who saw reason to criticise the decisions taken by the emperor and his immediate advisors, whether on grounds of moral principles or political expediency, needed opportunities and the means of expressing their views, whether as remonstrants to the throne, by withdrawal from public life or as authors of private writings.

Introduction by Dr Gordon Johnson (President, RAS):

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Placeless People: What can History tell us about today’s Refugee Crises?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 20th, 2016

Event Date: 20 June 2016
Council Room
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Pears Institute for the Study of Antisemitism  in association with the University of East Anglia presents:

Placeless People: What can History tell us about today’s Refugee Crises?

The aim of the workshop is to bring together experts in a range of fields – leading historians and scholars, policy makers, representatives from local government, NGOs, think tanks, advocacy groups and the media, to explore how history, in its broadest political, cultural and social senses, can usefully be employed to inform our understanding of the current refugee crisis and help shape our responses to it.

The workshop will address the following questions among others: are there connections between refugee crises in the past and the present? What lessons can be drawn? What kind of historical accounts do NGO’s and policy makers need to make their cases?  How might the recasting of refugee stories on a bigger historical canvas re-shape perception? And, most pressingly, how should policy and responses to the future be shaped by grasping that mass displacement may become the norm?

Programme:

Lyndsey Stonebridge and Becky Taylor (University of East Anglia) – Welcome and Introduction

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 Panel One: Refugees Now – Representations and Perspectives

This session will ask those working with refugees and communities affected by current refugee crises to talk about the problems of the current terms of media and political debates.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Ben Gidley (Birkbeck, University of London)

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Omar Khan (Runnymede Trust)

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Daniel Trilling (journalist, editor and author)

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Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh (Refuge in a Moving World Network, University College London)

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Panel Two: Lessons from History

This session will see historians exploring the different lessons we might draw from histories and the benefits and pitfalls of drawing on historical examples to understand today’s situation.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Becky Taylor (University of East Anglia)

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Simon Behrman (University of East Anglia)

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Jessica Reinisch (Birkbeck, University of London)

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Peter Gatrell (University of Manchester)

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Tony Kushner  (University of Southampton)

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Panel Three: Making History Now

This session will explore different ways in which people have been challenging mainstream representations of refugees, and how the voices of refugees themselves might be heard in public discourse and debates.

Introduction to the Panel and Chair: Lyndsey Stonebridge, University of East Anglia

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Yousif Qasmiyeh (poet and writer)

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Colin Yeo (immigration barrister and blogger, Garden Court Chambers Representatives of Freed Voices from Detention Action)

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Amir and Fred (Free Voices)

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Agnes Woolley (Royal Holloway, University of London)

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Dorothea Debus – Shaping Our Mental Lives

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 20th, 2016

Event Date: 20 June 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Dorothea Debus (York) – Shaping Our Mental Lives

Dorothea Debus teaches Philosophy at the University of York. Her main areas of research lie in the Philosophy of Mind and Psychology. She has written on philosophical questions relating to the phenomena of memory, the imagination, attention, and the emotions, and more recently she has started work on a new research project which investigates our active involvement with our own mental lives. The paper presented here will offer some of this new material for discussion.

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Researching Gendered Inclusion: Interdisciplinary Methodologies

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 17th, 2016

Event Date: 17 June 2016

Wivenhoe House Hotel
Wivenhoe Park,
Colchester CO4 3SQ

Middlesex University Business School, Middlesex University presents:

Gendered Inclusion in Contemporary Organisations

Seminar 3 – Researching Gendered Inclusion: Interdisciplinary Methodologies

This seminar series seeks to advance debates on gender workplace inequality by proposing a shift from exclusion to inclusion in theorising gender-related issues in contemporary organisations. To challenge the recent rise of postfeminist assertions that gender equality has been achieved and women just need to ‘lean in’ to be successful, this seminar series aims to critically explore the conditions, forms and circumstances of women’s and men’s inclusion in organisations in order to generate a more complex account of contemporary experiences of workplace (in)equalities.

To advance debates concerned with the persistence of gender inequality in contemporary organizations, this seminar series argues for a shift in how we theorise and understand the tenacity and experience of ongoing discrimination. Specifically, the series calls for a move away from explanations based on an assumption of exclusion (underpinned materially and symbolically by a masculine norm) towards a focus on the way in which women and men are included in organizations today.
The inclusion of women in the world of work appears to be an inherently ‘good’ project. The current extent to which women participate in the labour market is the result of many years of struggle to create the conditions for reducing gender inequality and deserves recognition.
For academic researchers, this success also poses challenges. How can academics question prevalent patterns of inclusion? How can we enter into a productive dialogue with practitioners and policymakers about the need to critically appraise and change the ways women and men are included within contemporary organisations?
This seminar provides a forum for creative engagement with a range of innovative, interdisciplinary research methodologies aiming to explore the gendered nature of inclusion.
It encourages us to reflect on our responsibilities as academics – and possibly powerful change agents – to infuse the potential for a critical approach to issues of workplace diversity and inclusion in our research and in our contacts with different organisational stakeholders.

The seminar series is organised by Dr Maria Adamson (Middlesex University), Professor Elisabeth Kelan (Cranfield University School of Management), Dr Patricia Lewis (University of Kent), Professor Nick Rumens (University of Portsmouth), and Professor Martyna Śliwa (Essex Business School).

Programme:

Professor Martyna Śliwa (Essex Business School) -  Introduction

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Professor Melissa Tyler (Essex Business School, University of Essex) – Rethinking Methodologies of Gender Inclusion

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Professor Emma Bell (Keele Management School, Keele University) – Analysing Gendered Representations in Popular Culture

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Louise Nash (Essex Business School, University of Essex) – (Male) Members Only: Place, Performativity and Position in the Powerhouse

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Dr Suvi Salmenniemi (Department of Sociology, University of Turku) – Ethnographic Encounters: Gender, Politics and Therapeutic Technologies

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Jerry Brotton – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 16th, 2016

Event Date: 16 June 2016

Royal Geographical Society
Education Centre/Main Hall
1 Kensington Gore,
London SW7 2AR

 The Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities presents:

The Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities

Professor Jerry Brotton (QMUL) – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

This event celebrated the launch of the new Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities with the inauguration of a new lecture series, the Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities. The Centre is a major interdisciplinary initiative cultivating links between arts and humanities scholars and practitioners, geographers and the creative, cultural and heritage sectors. It focuses in particular on five cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes:
•       The Environmental GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities scholarship on environment, nature and environmental change;
•       The Creative GeoHumanities, encompassing practice-based arts research engaging themes of place, space, landscape and environment;
•       The Spatial GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities research on imaginative geographies and the production of space, past and present;
•       The Digital GeoHumanities, including the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), geo-coded data and digital mapping within arts and humanities scholarship;
•       The Public GeoHumanities, encompassing the place-based and spatial understandings of the cultural, creative and heritage sectors as well as community and participatory work.

The Denis Cosgrove lecture series will be a regular part of the Centre’s programming. The inaugural lecture was given by Professor Jerry Brotton, School of English and Drama, QMUL. Professor Philip Crang and Dr Harriet Hawkins, Co-Directors of the Centre, introduced the event. Professor Stephen Daniels, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, offered the response.

Welcome by Professor Phil Crang  (RHUL):

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Introduction by Dr Harriet Hawkins (RHUL):

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Lecture:

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Response by Professor Stephen Daniels (Nottingham):

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Sexual Difference and the Symbolic: What Future?

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 14th, 2016


Event Date: 14 June 2016

Room B04
43 Gordon Sq.
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Sexual Difference and the Symbolic: What Future?

Speakers: Catherine Malabou (Kingston University) and Jacqueline Rose (Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities)

In psychoanalytic thinking, the symbolic is meant to secure the order of the world and of the mind. It is through the symbolic that sexual difference lays down its law. In this conversation, Catherine Malabou and Jacqueline Rose, both of whose writings have consistently engaged with this terrain, will discuss whether this model is still viable in modern times. Drawing on their shared and distinct research interests – from neuroscience to literary writing, from Kant to Melanie Klein, from plasticity to trans – they will address the question of the continuing relevance of psychoanalysis in a transforming world.

Conversation:

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