Stanley Fish – But We’re Professors: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 10th, 2014


Event Date: 10 October 2014
John Snow Lecture Theatre
London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine
Keppel St, Bloomsbury,
London WC1E 7HT

Birkbeck School of Law presents:

Annual Law Lecture 2013

‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States

The 2014 Annual Law Lecture presented by the School of Law, Birkbeck is ‘But We’re Professors’: Academic Freedom and Public Employee Law in the United States by

Professor Stanley Fish (Florida International University College of Law)

Justification is the key issue in any discussion of academic freedom. Why should academics be granted latitudes and privileges denied to other workers in other professions? One answer sometimes given to this question is that academics are exceptional or uncommon, “men of high gift and character”, and therefore should not suffer under the constraints imposed on ordinary people. In this lecture, Professor Fish explores this claim of academic exceptionalism as it turns up in public employee law in the United States.

Introduction by Professor Patricia Tuitt (Dean, Birkbeck School of Law):

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Paul Brass – Criminalization of Politics in India

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 9th, 2014

Event Date: 9 October 2014
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor (Emeritus) Paul Brass (University of Washington) – Criminalization of Politics in India

Criminality is widespread in Indian politics, but there are some landmark districts in parts of Uttar Pradesh, which are famous for it. In my own recent field work in India, I have found the area in central U.P. around the districts of Firozabad, Farrukhabad, and Auraiya to be especially rich in criminality, involving fatal attacks on political rivals and kidnapping and killing even of children. However, it is widespread elsewhere, in other parts of U.P. Moreover, everybody knows who the criminal politicians are and most of them remain free to carry out their criminal activities or, rather, to have lackeys carry them out for them. The names and criminal history of the politicians who are notorious for such violence are well known and published in the newspapers. Very few of these known criminals ever spend time in jail, though there are some who do. Whether or not these criminals land in jail or not, and for how long depends upon their political relationship with the ruling party of the day.

Paul R. Brass is Professor (Emeritus) of Political Science and International Studies at the University of Washington, Seattle. He has published numerous books and articles on comparative and South Asian politics, ethnic politics, and collective violence. His work has been based on extensive field research in India during numerous visits since 1961. He has been a University of Washington faculty member and Professor, Department of Political Science and The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies since 1965. He received his B.A. in Government in 1958, Harvard College; his M.A. in 1959, in Political Science, University of Chicago; and his Ph.D. in 1964, in Political Science, University of Chicago. His teaching specializations include comparative politics (South Asia), ethnicity and nationalism as well as collective violence.
His most recent books are The Politics of Northern India: 1937 to 1987—Volume I (An Indian Political Life: Charan Singh and Congress Politics, 1937 to 1961) (SAGE, 2011), Routledge Handbook of South Asian Politics: India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, and Nepal (2010), Forms of Collective Violence: Riots, Pogroms, and Genocide in Modern India (2006), The Production of Hindu–Muslim Violence in Contemporary India (2003), Theft of an Idol: Text and Context in the Representation of Collective Violence (1997), Riots and Pogroms (1996), and The Politics of India since Independence, 2nd ed. (1994).

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (RAS):

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Adrian Moore – Being, Univocity and Logical Syntax

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 6th, 2014

Event Date: 6 October 2014
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Professor Adrian Moore (Oxford) – Being, Univocity and Logical Syntax

As the first talk for the 2014/15 Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society, this year’s Presidential Address marks the official inauguration of Professor Adrian Moore, University of Oxford, as the 107th President of the Aristotelian Society. The Society’s President is elected on the basis of lifelong, exemplary work in philosophy. Please visit our Council page for further information regarding the Society’s past presidents.

The 107th Presidential Address will be chaired by David Papineau (KCL) – 106th President of the Aristotelian Society.

Adrian Moore is Professor of Philosophy at the University of Oxford, where he is also a Tutorial Fellow at St Hugh’s College.  He was an undergraduate at Cambridge and a graduate at Oxford, where he wrote his doctorate under the supervision of Michael Dummett.  He is one of Bernard Williams’ literary executors.  His publications include The Infinite; Points of View; Noble in Reason, Infinite in Faculty: Themes and Variations in Kant’s Moral and Religious Philosophy; and, most recently, The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things.

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David Webb – From Mathematics to Ethics in the Work of Michel Foucault

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 2nd, 2014

 

Event Date: 2 October 2014
Room JG5002,
John Galsworthy Building,
Penrhyn Road Campus, Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University  presents:

Professor David Webb (Staffordshire University) – From Mathematics to Ethics in the Work of Michel Foucault

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Jeff Widener – Tiananmen Square and Beyond – Conflict Photography in Asia, 1987-1995

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 30th, 2014

Event Date: 30 September 2014 
Room Q169
Queen’s Building Lecture Theatre
Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Department of History and the Department of Economics at Royal Holloway University of London present:

Jeff WidenerTiananmen Square and Beyond – Conflict Photography in Asia, 1987-1995

Jeff Widener is internationally renowned for his work at the Tiananmen Square protest and massacre in 1989, including the most iconic photograph of the last decades of the twentieth century: ‘The Tank Man.’ However, Jeff was the Associated Press Southeast Asia Picture Editor 1987-1995, based in Bangkok, Thailand, and Tiananmen Square was only one of many civil and armed conflicts he covered during the period.  Illustrating his lecture with his own photographs, Jeff will talk about the role and responsibilities of a photojournalist in documenting the nature and human suffering of war during his time at AP.
Jeff will also impart his own ‘Advice for Young People,’ based on his years as a photojournalist, as part of his talk.

Talk:

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The following day Jeff Widener was available for a longer Q&A session, where he at first talked about his childhood:

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then answered more questions from the audience:

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Photos from the event:

 

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Werner Hamacher – TÒ AUTÓ , THE SAME, – – (Celan with Parmenides and Heidegger)

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 30th, 2014

Event Date: 30 September 2014

Royal College of Art
Humanities Seminar Room 1
2nd Floor, Stevens Building,
2-6 Jay Mews,
London, SW7 2EP

The London Graduate School and the Royal College of Art present:

Professor Werner Hamacher (University of Frankfurt) -  TÒ AUTÓ , THE SAME, – – (Celan with Parmenides and Heidegger)

Werner Hamacher is Emmanuel Levinas Chair at the European Graduate School EGS,  Professor of General and Comparative Literature at the University of Frankfurt, Germany, and Global Distinguished Professor at the New York University. A leading critical thinker and theorist influenced by deconstructionist theory, his work bridges literature, philosophy and politics, and is situated in the domains of both aesthetics and hermeneutics. After studying philosophy, comparative literature and religious studies at the Free University of Berlin, Werner Hamacher studied at the École Normale Supérieure in Paris, where he established a significant relationship with Jacques Derrida and his work. From 1984 – 1998 he was Professor of German and the Humanities at Johns Hopkins University and is currently a guest professor at numerous universities in Europe and USA, among them Yale University, Free University of Berlin, University of Amsterdam, and École Normale Supérieure. Werner Hamacher translated and introduced the work of Jacques Lacan into German, as well as the writings of Nicolas Abraham, Paul de Man, Jorie Graham and Jean Daive.

Introduction by Professor Andrew Benjamin (Kingston):

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‘New Man’ Symposium

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on September 26th, 2014

Event Date: 26 – 27 September 2014
Teesside University Darlington
Vicarage Road
Darlington
DL1 1JW

The Centre for Fascist, Anti-Fascist and Post-Fascist Studies at Teeside University presents:

The ‘New Man’ Symposium

Conveners: Jorge Dagnino (de los Andes) & Matthew Feldman (Teesside)

The ‘New Man Symposium’ examines fascist movements and regimes through the lens of an attempted anthropological revolution. This attempt to create a ‘homo fascistus’ during the fascist epoch is approached via a comparative angle, with presentations by leaders in the field of Fascist Studies. Taking different perspectives and looking at national movements across Europe, as well as in Latin America, it is hoped that this interdisciplinary conference will revive interest in this much neglected topic.

Programme:
Day 1:

Session 1 (Chair: Professor Matthew Feldman):

Dr Martin Conway (Oxford) – New Men and Old Masculinities: The Interaction of Masculinity and Politics in Europe, 1930-1950

AUDIO HERE

Professor Mary Vincent (Sheffield) – ‘Half-monk, half-warrior’: the New Man in Spain

AUDIO HERE

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Session 2 (Chair: Dr Jorge Dagnino)
Rebecca Wennberg (Royal Holloway) – Beyond Totalitarianism: Images of the National Socialist ‘New Man’ in New Perpetrator Research

AUDIO HERE

Luca La Rovere (Perugia) – The ‘new man’ in Fascist Italy

AUDIO HERE

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Keynote Lecture  (Chair: Professor Matthew Feldman)

Professor Gregory Maertz (St. Johns) – Eugenic art: representations of the ‘new man’ in Nazi Germany from the seizure of power to Hitler’s suicide

AUDIO HERE

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Day 2

Session 3 (Chair: Dr Jorge Dagnino)

Dr Jeannette Baxter (Anglia Ruskin) – ‘Men in Fascism’: Encountering the New Man in the B.U.F. Press and Selected Writings of Wyndham Lewis

AUDIO HERE

Professor Aristotle Kallis (Lancaster) – The laboratory of ‘renewal’ (renovação): Brazil’s Ministry of Education and Health during the Vargas dictatorship (1930-1945)

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Dr Joan Tumblety (Southampton) – The limits of the fascist new man in France

AUDIO HERE

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Session 4 (Chair: Professor Matthew Feldman)

Dr Tudor Georgescu (Oxford Brookes) – When New Men Dig Ditches Too: The Transylvanian Saxon Self-Help’s Youth movement and volunteer work camps in 1930s and 1940s Romania

AUDIO HERE

Dr Valentin Sandulescu (Bucharest) – The Iron Guard’s failed struggle for regenerating the nation: Romanian fascism and its goal of creating a ‘new man’

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Dr Rory Yeomans (Oxford) – Constructing a New Ustasha Man: Education, Social Mobility and Mass Killing in the Militia State

AUDIO HERE

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Sally Davies – The Drugs Don’t Work: A Global Threat

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 12th, 2014

cumberland-lodge_v1

 

Event Date: 22 September 2014
Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP

Cumberland Lodge  presents:

Dame Sally Davies (Chief Medical Officer, England) – The Drugs Don’t Work: A Global Threat

Antibiotics add 20 years to our lives and for the last 70 years, since the manufacture of penicillin in 1943, they have allowed us to survive extraordinary operations and lifethreatening infections. However, resistance to our current range of antibiotics is the new inconvenient truth.

Dame Sally Davies, the first woman to hold the post of Chief Medical Officer for England and independent advisor to the Government on medical matters, will be appearing at Cumberland Lodge to talk about her research in this area revealing that if we don’t act now, we risk the health of our parents, our children and our grandchildren.

Introduction by Dr Owen Gower (Cumberland Lodge):

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Andrew Siemion – The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 11th, 2014


Event Date: 11 September 2014
Room B36
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Malet Street
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences presents:

Dr Andrew Siemion (Berkeley) – The Search for Extra-terrestrial Intelligence

Astrobiologist Dr Andrew Siemion of the University of California Berkeley, is speaking about the history of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI), the latest developments in the science of astrobiology and the prospects for dramatic advances in the field using the latest generation of world-class telescopes.

Humanity has spent millennia questioning whether there could be intelligent life elsewhere in the cosmic system. For the first time in our history the answer may now be within our grasp. During the last several decades astronomers have discovered that the key environmental factors that gave rise to life on Earth are present in abundance throughout the Milky Way galaxy. Long lived stars, planets, water and complex organic molecules are known to be ubiquitous. Armed with the certainty that life could have developed elsewhere, scientists everywhere are racing to determine if indeed it did, and if so, whether some of that life went on to develop a technological capability similar to our own.

Professor Ian Crawford of Birkbeck’s Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences said: “We’re delighted to welcome Dr Siemion to deliver this lecture at Birkbeck. Dr Siemion’s research group at Berkeley are at the forefront of the search for extraterrestrial intelligence and this is an exciting opportunity to hear about the latest news and developments from the field, as well as what the next few years might uncover”.

Introduction By Professor Ian Crawford (Birkbeck):

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Cumberland Lodge Podcasts

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on August 29th, 2014

cumberland-lodge_v1

 

Cumberland Lodge is an educational charity and a unique conference centre in the heart of the Great Park, Windsor. Its Patron is The Queen, who has granted sole occupancy of a beautiful seventeenth-century house for discussions aimed at the betterment of society.

As a venue, the Lodge plays host to universities and to many professional organisations including the National Health Service, the Inns of Court, learned societies, charities, government and non-government organisations and many higher education institutions, and appropriate organisations from the commercial sector. The Lodge also organises its own major conference programme that initiates fresh debate on issues of national and international significance.

Set in the tranquil heart of Windsor Great Park, only 27 miles from London and a short distance from Heathrow airport, Cumberland Lodge is perfectly placed for local, national and international meetings. Dining and accommodation are top class and the atmosphere is that of a friendly country house.

Below you can find a selection of recordings made at Cumberland Lodge over the past few years:

Ethics: Professor Sir Michael Marmot on Health and Wealth.
2012: Professor Sir Micheal Marmot delivers the inaugural Windsor Ethics Lecture.

Ethics: 2011 Cumberland Lodge Annual Lecture, given by Shami Chakrabarti
Shami Chakrabarti discusses Common Values and Human Rights

Cumberland Lodge: Rt Hon Lord Justice Laws on Lord Denning and the Value of Barristers’ to Cumberland Lodge
2011: Rt Hon Sir John Laws, Lord Justice of Appeal, here explains the value of discussing the law with barristers-in-training at Cumberland Lodge.

Cumberland Lodge: William Shawcross CVO discusses the Queen Mother’s role in the founding of St. Catharine’s at Cumberland Lodge in 1947
2011: William Shawcross, the Official Biographer of Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother explains her role in establishing an educational charity at Cumberland Lodge.

Higher Education: Sir Graeme Davies on key moments in the development of Higher Education since the First World War
2011: Professor Sir Graeme Davies, Trustee of Cumberland Lodge and former Vice-Chancellor of the University of London discusses the key policy decisions that have been taken regarding universities in the UK since 1919.

Higher Education: Sir Deian Hopkin on university education as a gateway to improved life chances
2011: Professor Sir Deian Hopkin, former Vice-Chancellor of London South Bank University and Interim Chairman of the Student Loans Company, discusses access to higher education.

Higher Education: Claire Fox on how the value of university education is poorly expressed in modern discourse
2011: Claire Fox, Director of the Institute of Ideas, argues that academia has lost its ability and confidence to define the value of Higher Education in its own terms.

Arts: Author Salley Vickers on The Spirit of Stories
2011: Salley Vickers, author of Miss Garnet’s Angel, Mr Golighty’s Holiday, The Other Side of You and Where Three Roads Meet discusses what we can learn from The Spirit of Stories.

Cumberland Lodge: Sir Roger Young recalls the early days of the Foundation
2010: Sir Roger Young, the first resident tutor at Cumberland Lodge in 1948, discusses the purpose the foundation was intended to serve, and the people who shaped it in the 1940s and 50s.

Ethics and Society: Katharine Whitehorn, writer and columnist, on cultural attitudes to old age and death
2010: Katharine Whitehorn, celebrated author of books such as “How to Survive Children” and “Cooking in a Bedsitter” and former columnist for the Observer, on the significance of the final years of life.

Society: Naomi Eisenstadt CB on reading and social justice
2010: Naomi Eisenstadt, Senior Research Fellow at the University of Oxford and former director of the Social Exclusion Task Force, on how the inability to read reinforces other social disadvantages.

Education: Douglas Board considers the perception of academic researchers outside academia
2010: Douglas Board, founder of the career’s advice business Maslow’s Attic, offers career advice to early career researchers.

Environment: Bob Flowerdew on the Future of Gardens and Gardening
2010: Bob Flowerdew, Organic Gardener and TV and Radio Broadcaster, discusses the future of gardens and gardening.

Ethics: Lord Bichard of Nailsworth discusses the ethical challenges of balancing the privacy of the individual against the protection of the community.
2010: Lord Bichard, Director of the Institute for Government, explores the ethical challenges faced by the state when it obtains sensitive data on its citizens.

Law and Society: Dr Jeff King on the status of “Social Rights”
2010: Dr Jeff King, CUF Lecturer in the Faculty of Law at Oxford University, here discusses the status of social rights such as the rights to education, housing and welfare. Are these rights legally recognised? Do they have the same status as human rights? If so, how are they enforced in the UK?

Politics and Society: Mike Trace on Global Drug Policy
2010: Mike Trace, Chair of the International Drugs Policy Consortium, here analyses the global development of drugs policy over the last fifty years. Have the UN conventions on drugs reduced the harms caused by drug abuse and drug traficking? If not, why not?

Arts and Society: Vikki Heywood on ‘An Imaginary Collection of Notionally Identical Experiments’
2009: Vikki Heywood, Executive Director of the Royal Shakespeare Company, talks about what makes for an effective arts organisation at our March 2009 conference entitled: Do we have the Arts Funding System we deserve?

Arts: Sir John Tusa discusses how the arts should be funded.
2009: Sir John Tusa on: “The Arts: A Suitable Case for Treatment”.

Cumberland Lodge Archives: An early student visitor, C.D. Curling, recalls his first visits to the Lodge in the 1950s.
1978: An interview between Walter James, former Principal of Cumberland Lodge, and C.D. Curling, an early visitor to the Lodge.

Arts: An extract of a poetry reading given by Sir Andrew Motion
2009: Sir Andrew Motion reads an extract of the poem “Harry Patch”, read on the day before the unexpected announcement of Harry Patch’s death. This is followed by a reading of “The Mower”.

Ethics: Dr Kai Spiekermann on Carbon Offsetting
2009: Dr Kai Spiekermann discusses the ethics of carbon offsetting.

Ethics: Dr Tom Shakespeare on Pre-Natal Diagnosis for Disability.
2003: Dr Tom Shakespeare, research fellow at the Institute for Policy and Practice at Newcastle University, discusses the ethics of pre-natal diagnosis (PND) for disability.

Ethics: Professor Simon Caney on who should bear the burden of climate change
2009: Simon Caney, Professor of Political Theory at the University of Oxford, discusses the philosophical problems involved in developing a principle of justice which applies to the threat of climate change.

Law and Society: HH Judge Daniel Pearce-Higgins QC explains the Criminal Justice System
2009: HH Judge Daniel Pearce-Higgins QC explains the Criminal Justice System and explores some of the challenges it currently faces.

Law and Society: Julie Spence on the public’s perception of crime and justice
2009: Julie Spence, Chief Constable of Cambridgeshire, discusses why people are more afraid of crime than ever when the statistics show that levels of crime are decreasing.

Law and Society: The Rt Hon Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers discusses alternatives to prison
2007: The Rt Hon Lord Phillips of Worth Matravers, former Lord Chief Justice of England and Wales, discusses alternatives to custody.

Politics: An interview with Professor Klaus Dodds on the Antarctic Treaty
2009: Klaus Dodds, Professor of Geopolitics at Royal Holloway, discusses the creation of the Antarctic Treaty in 1959, its current geopolitical significance and the challenges it faces in the future.

Politics: An interview with Robert Culshaw on the Antarctic Treaty
2009: Robert Culshaw, Deputy Director of the British Antarctic Survey, talks about how the Antarctic Treaty enables international scientific collaboration.

Religion and Society: Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor discusses what the religiosity of America means for the rest of the world
2007: Cardinal Cormac Murphy-O’Connor, Archbishop Emeritus of Westminster, discusses the religiousity of America in a conference entitled: The World’s View of America,

Religion and Society: Interview with Charlie Beckett, Director of POLIS, on the state of religious news coverage in the UK
2009: Charlie Beckett, Director of POLIS – the journalism thinktank at the London School of Economics, discusses the challenges of reporting on religious matters in the 21st century.

Religion and Society: Ruth Gledhill discusses the relationship between religion and the news.
2009: Ruth Gledhill, Religion Correspondent for The Times, talks about the nature of religious news.

Society: An Interview with Danny Kushlick on Drugs Policy
2009: Judge Daniel Pearce-Higgins QC interviews Danny Kushlick, Head of Policy at Transform, about the UK’s drug control policy.

Society: Dr Kate Meagher on how organisations of the poor and marginalised in contemporary Africa could gain political influence
2009: Dr Kate Meagher, of the LSE Development Studies Institute, discusses why social organisations which represent marginalised people in Nigeria fail to influence political decisions taken by government.

Society: Lynne Berry on Social Cohesion
2008: Lynne Berry, Chief Executive of the WRVS, discusses what makes for a cohesive society at a conference entitled “Trumpeting the Voluntary: Social Conscience and the Third Sector”.

Society: Professor Anne Power on the role of the built environment in shaping society
2009: Anne Power, Professor of Social Policy and Director of Housing and Communities at the LSE discusses the possibilities for tackling social problems through the built environment.

Society: Professor Christopher Bigsby on American Culture
2008: Is the exporting of American culture a new form of imperialism? Professor Christopher Bigsby discusses whether there is any such thing as ‘American’ culture.

Society: Professor Frank Furedi discusses the nature of fear in modern society
2009: Professor Frank Furedi, Professor of Sociology at the University of Kent discusses the question: “What is fear and what makes communities confident?”

Society: The Rt Hon Lord Smith of Finsbury on the Built Environment and Climate Change
2009: Lord Smith, Chairman of the Environment Agency, discusses ways to improve our buildings to make them more energy efficient and better able to cope with the challenges of climate change.

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Cumberland Lodge is the home of an educational charity, founded in 1947 to promote ethical discussion and cross-disciplinary collaboration

Cumberland Lodge
The Great Park,
Windsor,
Berkshire, SL4 2HP
Tel: 01784 432 316.
Registered charity: 1108677

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