Ünver Rüstem – Justice, Conquest, and Victory: The Evolving Symbolism of Istanbul’s Nusretiye Mosque

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 17th, 2015

Event Date: 17 February 2015
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Dr  Ünver Rüstem (Fari Sayeed Visting Fellow in Islamic Art , Pembroke College, University of Cambridge) – Justice, Conquest, and Victory: The Evolving Symbolism of Istanbul’s Nusretiye Mosque

In 1826, the great reformist Ottoman sultan Mahmud II inaugurated two major new institutions in his capital, Istanbul: a modern army to replace the unruly janissary corps, and an imperial mosque gracing the Bosphorus shoreline. Although begun in 1823, the mosque became firmly associated with the military reforms that occurred during its completion three years later. Not only was the opening of the mosque timed to correspond with Mahmud’s announcement of his reforms, but the building rapidly underwent a series of name changes that underscored and announced its symbolic role, culminating in the appellation Nusretiye (Victory). This talk will use hitherto unexplored documents to trace the Nusretiye Mosque’s formation as an architectural statement of Mahmud’s modernising agenda. Alongside the written evidence, attention will be given to the Nusretiye’s pronounced visual resemblance to the mosque of Mahmud’s reformist predecessor Selim III, whose thwarted efforts to overhaul the Ottoman military both anticipated and served as a foil for Mahmud’s subsequent victory.
Ünver Rüstem is a graduate of Harvard University. He is the author of a prizewinning article on the reception of illustrated manuscripts as revealed by a group of Ottoman textual inserts added to the Shahnama of Shah Tahmasp. His forthcoming publications include an article on the exportation of carved Ottoman tombstones from Istanbul to Cyprus, a contribution to a co-authored chapter on the artistic patronage of Mahmud I, and edited translations of two later Ottoman primary sources on architecture.

Introduction by Dr Alison Otha (Director, RAS):

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Linda Colley – Magna Carta in British History: Memory, Inventions and Forgetting

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 16th, 2015

Event Date: 17 June 2014

Windsor Auditorium
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University presents:

The 2014 Magna Carta Lecture

Professor Linda Colley CBE (Shelby M. C. Davis 1958 Professor of History, Princeton University) – Magna Carta in British History: Memory, Inventions and Forgetting

2015 will witness celebrations of the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta. Yet how this iconic text has been understood, used and commemorated has changed markedly over the centuries, not just in England, but throughout the British Isles and in the one-time British Empire. This lecture explores some of these shifts over time, and discusses how – and how far – the cult that evolvedaround this text can be related to the UK’s lack of a written constitution.

Introduction by Professor Paul Layzell (Principal, RHUL):

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Penelope Corfield (RHUL):

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Phiroze Vasunia – Sir William Jones and the Gods of Greece, Italy and India

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 12th, 2015

Event Date: 12 February 2015
Royal Asiatic Society
Stephenson Way
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Professor Phiroze Vasunia (UCL) – British India and the First World War: Words, Objects and Images

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (President, RAS):

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Etienne Balibar – The Idea of a Multiversum – Logics, Cosmology, Politics

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 12th, 2015

Event Date: 12 February 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Etienne Balibar (CRMEP, Kingston University/Columbia University, NY)-  The Idea of a Multiversum – Logics, Cosmology, Politics

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Patrick Leman – Inside Children’s Peer Interactions

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 12th, 2015

Event Date: 12 February 2015

Windsor Auditorium

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Inaugural Lecture

Professor Patrick Leman (RHUL) – Inside Children’s Peer Interactions

Children often regard adults as infallible sources of knowledge. However, in discussions with their peers children can be freer to question, discuss and explore the world for themselves. Psychologists have often regarded peer interaction as one of the fundamental building blocks of development. This lecture describes research examining how children interact with their peers, and how these interactions are affected by social identities such as gender and ethnicity. It will also consider why children can often learn better through peer interactions than from adult instruction across a range of topics from morality to understanding of science.

Introduction by Professor Rob Kemp (Deputy Principal, RHUL):

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Vote of Thanks by Dr Harriet Tennenbaum (Surrey):

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The Housing Disaster: Danny Dorling in Conversation with Paul Watt

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 10th, 2015

Event Date: 10 February 2015
Keynes Library
43 Gordon Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1H 0PD

The Centre for the Study of British Politics and Public Life presents:

The Housing Disaster: Danny Dorling in Conversation with Paul Watt

In the last twelve months the crisis in housing in the UK turned into a disaster. Housing prices in London and the South East continued to rise at very high rates along with rents which reached maxima never before recorded. In contrast, many people’s ability to pay was reduced both as median incomes fell and as other costs of living such as fuel and food rose. Evictions and potential evictions became headline news with young children from families likely to be put of out their homes being shown on the evening news. In more economically depressed parts of the country the quality of much private sector housing deteriorated to new lows while MPs talked out bills designed to improve the rights of tenants and the Chancellor of the Exchequer did all he could to encourage prices to rise further and faster through to May 2015, reducing the stamp duty bill by £800 million in December 2014 and removing all tax restrictions on wealthy pensioners buying property (to let) with their annuities before or by April 2015. And, all the time, the existing housing stock was being used less an less efficiently with more flats and rooms in houses than ever before being left empty.

Professor Danny Dorling is a professor of human geography at Oxford University. He is the author of a number of books including All That Is Solid, and, most recently Inequality and the 1%

Dr Paul Watt is Senior Lecturer in Urban Studies in the Department of Geography, Environment & Development Studies at Birkbeck. He is author of ‘Understanding Social Inequality’ with Tim Butler (Sage, 2007), and editor of ‘Mobilities and Neighbourhood Belonging in Cities and Suburbs’ with Peer Smets (Palgrave Macmillan, 2014). He is the author of numerous articles on social housing.

Introduction by Dr Alejandro Colas (Birkbeck):

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Tony Ageh – The BBC and a Digital Public Sphere

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 10th, 2015

Event Date: 10 February 2015

Management Building Lecture Theatre

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Tony Ageh OBE (Controller of Archive, BBC and Honorary Research Fellow, Department of Media Arts, RHUL) – The BBC and a Digital Public Sphere

The BBC’s charter is due for renewal soon after the General Election. Licence fee funded public service broadcasting is again being questioned. Tony Ageh OBE, BBC’s Controller of Archive, will outline how the BBC’s huge archive of programmes can be used to enhance the BBC’s public service role. There will be a response from Dr Anna Whitelock,  Centre for Public History, Heritage and Engagement with the Past  (Royal Holloway).

Introduction by Professor John Ellis (RHUL):

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Kiran Klaus Patel – The New Deal: A Global History

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 10th, 2015

Event Date: 10 February 2015

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2014/2015

Professor Kiran Klaus Patel (Maastricht University/LSE) – The New Deal: A Global History

This presentation summarizes some of the findings of my forthcoming book with the same title (America in the world series; Princeton University Press, planned for fall 2015). How does the reaction of the United States compare to the way other societies reacted to the Great Depression and other challenges of the time? And which links did the New Deal make and unmake? In the talk, I will speak about the book’s conceptual basis as well as some of its empirical findings.

Introduction by Professor Greg Claeys (RHUL):

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Sophie Gibb – Defending Dualism

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 9th, 2015

Event Date: 9 February 2015
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Sophie Gibb (Durham) – Defending Dualism

Sophie Gibb is Senior Lecturer at the Department of Philosophy, Durham University. Her research is in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, with particular interests in the mental causation debate, the categories of being, and causation, laws and powers. Recent papers are on the ontology of the mental causation debate, the subset account of property realization, and tropes and laws. She is leader of the philosophy of mind work group within the Durham Emergence Project, which is an interdisciplinary research initiative involving collaboration between philosophers and physicists, made possible through the support of the John Templeton Foundation.

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Stephen Downes – On the Musically Sentimental: from Chopin to Barry Manilow

in Academic Service - Archive by on February 9th, 2015

Event Date: 9 February 2015

Windsor Auditorium

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Inaugural Lecture

Professor Stephen Downes (RHUL) – On the Musically Sentimental: from Chopin to Barry Manilow

Sentimentalism has been a neglected, even derided notion in romantic music but this talk argues that it is a crucial aspect of some of the finest music of the 19th century. This will be exemplified, at the piano, by extracts from Chopin. The talk will also demonstrate an aspect of the legacy of romantic sentimentalism through considering Barry Manilow’s 1970s power ballad, Could it be Magic.

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Stephen Goss (Surrey):

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