David Owen – Hidden Perspectives: The Military Conversations 1906-1914

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 21st, 2014

 

Event Date: 21 March 2014

Moore Building Lecture Theatre
Royal Holloway, University of London
Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX

 

The 2014 Runnymede Literary Festival at Royal Holloway presents:

Lord David Owen – Hidden Perspectives: The Military Conversations 1906-1914

In a new book, Lord David Owen focuses on the military and diplomatic conversations that took place in the run up to World War I, beginning with January 1906, when the Prime Minister, Campbell-Bannerman, and the Foreign Minister, Edward Grey, agreed to allow the General Staff to talk with the French High Command about sending an expeditionary force to France in the event of a German attack. Neither the Cabinet nor Parliament was informed. In Spring 1912 Haldane, the Secretary for War, went on a mission to Berlin to see if an agreement could be reached to slow German naval expansion. Sadly to no avail – despite Harcourt, the Colonial Secretary, promoting a land deal for Germany in Africa as an incentive. Recently unearthed historical evidence has shown that a further attempt to negotiate with Germany was under way when the war started. All this time, however, there was a hidden perspective of key diplomats, alongside the Foreign Minister Grey, that contributed to the feeling that there was a moral commitment to send troops to the continent. There are obvious echoes of the run-up to the 2003 Iraq War.
Lord Owen will talk about these hidden perspectives and his conclusion, as a former Foreign Secretary, that the carnage of World War 1 was avoidable: the war could have been prevented or stopped much earlier.

Lord David Owen served as British Foreign Secretary from 1977 to 1979. He became the European Union co-chairman of the Conference for the Former Yugoslavia, along with Cyrus Vance, the former US Secretary of State; together they produced the Vance-Owen Peace Plan in January 1993. He was the Chancellor of the University of Liverpool from 1996 to 2009. His publications include Balkan Odyssey (1995) and The Hubris Syndrome: Bush, Blair and the Intoxication of Power (2007). He sits in the House of Lords as a crossbencher.

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Tibetan in Digital Communication

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on March 21st, 2014

 

Event Date: 21 March 2014
Room T101
Language Centre
22 Russell Square
SOAS, University of London,
WC1H 0XG

The Department of Linguistics at SOAS presents:

Tibetan in Digital Communication

Tibetan in Digital Communication is a research project funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, engaged in building a 1,000,000 syllable part-of-speech tagged corpus of Tibetan texts spanning the language’s entire history. In addition to the corpus, the project is developing a number of digital tools that allows for the corpus to be employed in many areas of humanities research, and enables other researchers to more easily develop their own corpora or software tools.
The corpus will itself be a powerful resource for scholars working with Tibetan language materials in a wide range of disciplines –including history, religion, literature and linguistics–since it offers ready access to, and comparison across, texts from different time periods, regions and genres. It will also provide an important foundation for subsequent work on a historically comprehensive, lexicographically rigorous dictionary of Tibetan, akin to the Oxford English Dictionary.
By building this corpus for Tibetan, the cost of developing language technologies, such as text messaging, spellcheckers and machine-aided translation will be reduced. These technologies would give Tibetans the choice to use their language as they see fit in a world that is increasingly shaped by digital communication.

Programme:

Introduction to the day by Dr Nathan W. Hill (SOAS):

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Dr Nathan W. Hill (SOAS) – Tibetan Word Breaking and Part of Speech Categories

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Abel Zadoks (SOAS) – The Middle Tibetan auxiliary system

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Dr Nathan W. Hill (SOAS) - A rule based tagger for Classical Tibetan

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Dr Edward Garrett (SOAS) -  An interface for corpus based Tibetan linguistics research

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Lorna Hutson – Are those circumstances really necessary? The example of Romeo and Juliet

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 20th, 2014

                                                       

Event Date: 20 March 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

 The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Lorna Hutson (St Andrew’s) – Are those circumstances really necessary? The example of Romeo and Juliet

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Lesley Pullen – Textiles of Sumatra: Traditional Cloth from the Island of Gold

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 19th, 2014

Event Date: 19 March 2014 
St James’s Piccadilly,
197 Piccadilly,
London W1J 9LL

The Oriental Rug and Textile Society of Great Britain presents:

                                                

Lesley Pullen (SOAS) – Textiles of Sumatra: Traditional Cloth from the Island of Gold

Known by early traders as Suwarnadwipa or Island of Gold, the textiles that originate from Sumatra are as varied as those from throughout the entire Indonesian archipelago together. The ancient Austronesian animist roots, the centuries of Hindu-Buddhist culture, and the subsequent domination of Islam all heavily influenced the societies of the coastal regions of Sumatra. Societal structures and sacred beliefs evolved over time and with them the use of textiles, which increasingly developed into symbols of power, wealth and status. As the belief in the scared qualities of the textiles diminished, the need for overt and excessive consumption increased. Costly imported materials in gold, silver and silk from Indian and Chinese sources dominated the Malay court cultures of Sumatra.

This highly illustrated lecture will be followed by a handling session of Sumatra textiles from a private collection.

Born in Medan Sumatra, Lesley has been a Tutor on the Southeast Asian Art module of the SOAS Postgraduate Diploma in Asian Art programme for the past five years. She is also an occasional lecturer on SOAS BA and MA courses, and an independent lecturer. Lesley collects Asian material art, particularly Indonesian textiles, and travels to different parts of Asia frequently. She is currently pursuing a PhD in Indonesian art history at SOAS.

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Bubonic plague: the biology and why it matters

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 18th, 2014

Event Date: 18 March 2014

McCrea 336

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

Royal Holloway University of London Department of History


Departmental Research seminars 2013/2014

Joint Roundtable: ‘Bubonic plague: the biology and why it matters’
Graham Twigg (Biology, RHUL), Professor Vincent Jansen (Mathematical Biology Group, RHUL), Professor  Justin Champion (History) and Professor  Peregrine Horden (History)

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Annemarie Mol – Physio-moral accounts – Eating pleasures and destructions

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 13th, 2014

Event Date: 13 March 2014

Dana Studio,
The Science Museum’s Dana Centre
165 Queen’s Gate
London SW7 5HD

 

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

HARC Dialogues:

The Value of Eating

Professor Annemarie Mol (Amsterdam) – Physio-moral accounts – Eating pleasures and destructions

Eating is not just factual, it is also valuable. But how to value eating? There are many modes for doing so and in this presentation I will compare and contrast a few of them. Hence, I will come to talk about two clashing ways to establish when as a person one has had enough to eat: by counting calories ingested or by appreciating satisfaction. And what about efficiency? Economic calculations will say that it may be efficient to feed chicken and sell them as and when this generates a profit. Calculating nutrients, by contrast, suggests that it is most likely more efficient if humans directly eat the chicken feed. And then there is the moral conundrum that eating is destructive. Consumers destroy their foods. They may destroy a lot along with it, but at the same time heirloom vegetables or rare animal breeds only thrive thanks to some people’s willingness to eat them. Physio-moralities are complex. And this will be my conclusion: amidst the tensions and complexities laid out, it is impossible not to act, but moral comfort is nowhere to be found.

Followed by a response from Professor Philip Crang (RHUL)

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Introduction by Professor Rachel Beckles Willson (RHUL):

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Professor Annemarie Mol (Amsterdam):

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Response from Professor Philip Crang (RHUL):

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David Nirenberg – Anti-Judaism as a System of Thought

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 13th, 2014

 

Event Date: 13 March 2014

Arts Two Lecture Theatre,
Queen Mary, University of London,
Mile End Campus,
Mile End Road,
London E1 4NS

The Leo Baeck Institute London presents:

The 2nd Annual Leo Baeck Institute Lecture

Professor David Nirenberg (Chicago) – Anti-Judaism as a System of Thought

In his recent book “Anti-Judaism: The History of a Way of Thinking,” David Nirenberg argued that Anti-Judaism should not be thought of as some archaic or irrational closet in the vast edifices of Western thought.  Instead, he suggested, it was a powerful conceptual tool, one that played an important role in helping many people make sense of the complex world they lived in.  In this lecture he will explain how Anti-Judaism became so central, and describe some of the work it has done in shaping the ways in which past peoples interpreted the worlds they lived in.

David Nirenberg is Deborah R. and Edgar D. Jannotta Professor of Medieval History and Social Thought at the Universityof Chicago, and the director of the university’s Neubauer Collegium for Culture and Society.  His research focuses on the ways in which Jewish, Christian, and Islamic societies have interacted with and thought about each other over the ages.  His books on the subject include Communities of Violence: Persecution of Minorities in the Middle Ages, as well as Judaism and Christian Art.  His recent book Anti-Judaism: The Western Tradition (2013) traces the multiple ways in which thinking about Jews and Judaism has shaped Christian, Islamic, and modern secular thought.  His Neighboring Faiths: Christianity, Islam, and Judaism Medieval and Modern, will appear in 2014.  David Nirenberg is also a contributor to publications such as The Nation, The New Republic, and The London Review of Books.

Welcome by Professor Miri Rubin (QMUL):

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Introduction by Professor Raphael Gross (LBI):

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Andrew Zurcher – Gift and Condition in King Lear

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 13th, 2014

                                                       

Event Date: 13 March 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

 The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Dr Andrew Zurcher (Cambridge)  – Gift and condition in King Lear

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Nina Power – Philosophy and the collective

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 13th, 2014

 

Event Date: 13 March 2014

Swedenborg Hall
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University  presents:

Dr Nina Power (Roehampton) – Philosophy and the Collective

Nina Power is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at Roehampton University. She studied for her PhD in the CRMEP (awarded 2006). Her publications include One Dimensional Woman (2009) and an edited collection of Badiou’s writings, On Beckett (2003, with Alberto Toscano). She has written widely on philosophies and politics of the subject, atomism, Marx and Marxism and Feuerbach. She is the reviews editor for The Philosophers’ Magazine.

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Robin Coningham – From the Oxus to Mysore: the Story of the Allchin Partnership in South Asian Archaeology

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 13th, 2014

Event Date: 13 March 2014 

Royal Asiatic Society

Stephenson Way 
London NW1 2HD

 

The Royal Asiatic Society presents:

Presentation of the RAS Medal 2014 to Professor Bridget Allchin with a lecture in her honour by Professor Robin Coningham (Durham) – From the Oxus to Mysore: the Story of the Allchin Partnership in South Asian Archaeology

Introduction by Professor Peter Robb (President, RAS):

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