Peregrine Horden – Periodization in Mediterranean History

Event Date: 17 October 2015 McCrea 336 Royal Holloway University of London Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX Royal Holloway University of London Department of History 
Departmental Research seminars 2015/2016 Professor Peregrine Horden (RHUL) – Periodization in Mediterranean History Trying to rethink the nature and scope of Mediterranean history (in Horden-Purcell, The Corrupting Sea and its successor volume, as well as in …

Bubonic plague: the biology and why it matters

Event Date: 18 March 2014 McCrea 336 Royal Holloway University of London Egham, Surrey TW20 0EX Royal Holloway University of London Department of History 
Departmental Research seminars 2013/2014 Joint Roundtable: ‘Bubonic plague: the biology and why it matters’ Graham Twigg (Biology, RHUL), Professor Vincent Jansen (Mathematical Biology Group, RHUL), Professor  Justin Champion (History) and Professor  Peregrine Horden (History) accompanying images: …

David Abulafia – The Great Sea: A Human History of the Mediterranean

  Event Date: 17 January 2012
 
McCrea 219 Royal Holloway University of London Royal Holloway University of London Department of History 
Departmental Research seminars 2011/2012 Professor David Abulafia (Cambridge) in conversation with Professor Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway) and Professor David Cesarani (Royal Holloway) about his acclaimed new book The Great Sea. A Human History of the Mediterranean share this entry:

Peregrine Horden – What’s Wrong with Medieval Medicine?

Royal Holloway History Department Research Seminar Series Date: 20 October 2009 Peregrine Horden – What’s Wrong with Medieval Medicine? As the late great Roy Porter observed, we in the developed world have never have it so good. By any measure we have never been healthier. And yet we have also never been so anxious about our health, or so critical …

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Teaching History in Deep Time

29 April 2009 – Teaching History in Deep Time – Two historians – Professor Peregrine Horden and Professor Penelope Corfield – and one geographer – Professor Clive Gamble – explore the relationship between ‘time’ and ‘History’ and how the study of History over long periods of time, or ‘Deep History’, can further an understanding the past. While present research clearly points to a shift in periodisation and classification, teaching History in ‘Deep Time’ is clearly something that has not yet entered the syllabus of undergraduate teaching. The discussion here proposes some practical models.