Martin Regal – Shakespeare and Modernist Theatre

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 22nd, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 22 January 2015
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Martin Regal (Reykjavik)  – Shakespeare and Modernist Theatre

Introduction by Anne-Sophie Refskou (Kingston):

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Catherine Malabou and Eric Laurent – Psychoanalysis and the Cognitive Sciences

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 22nd, 2015

 

Event Date: 22 January 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

The London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins presents:

Catherine Malabou and Eric Laurent – Psychoanalysis and the Cognitive Sciences

Catherine Malabou and Eric Laurent debate psychoanalysis and the cognitive sciences

Catherine Malabou is Professor of Philosophy at the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy, Kingston University. Her work focuses upon the inter-relationship between Continental philosophy, neuroscience and recent discoveries in epigenetics through which she has developed the concept of ‘plasticity’. Her publications include ‘The New Wounded: From Neurosis to Brain Damage’ (2007) and ‘Self and Emotional Life: merging Philosophy, Psychoanalysis and Neuroscience’ (with Adrian Johnston, 2010).

Éric Laurent is a psychoanalyst and former president of the World Association of Psychoanalysis. Trained by Jacques Lacan in the 1970s, Éric Laurent was a member of the directorate of the École freudienne de Paris at the time of the School’s dissolution in 1980 and has been a member of the École de la Cause freudienne since its inception. He was editor-in-chief of La Cause freudienne from 1992 to 1994 and currently teaches within the framework of the Clinical Section of the Department of Psychoanalysis at University Paris-VIII.

Introduction by Professor Scott Wilson (Kingston) and Dr Véronique Voruz (Kingston):

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Catherine Malabou:

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Eric Laurent:

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Information about the MA Psychoanalysis at Kingston University can be found HERE.

 

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Howard Caygill – Philosophical Kafkas

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 15th, 2015

Event Date: 15 January 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Howard Caygill (Kingston) – Philosophical Kafkas

Introduction by Dr Kamini Vellodi (CSM):

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Lesley Chamberlain – Wagner’s “Reformation” Shakespeare

in Academic Service - Archive by on January 8th, 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 8 January 2015
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Lesley ChamberlainWagner’s “Reformation” Shakespeare

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Simon Morgan Wortham – Realism and psychosis

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 18th, 2014

Event Date: 18 December 2014
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Simon Morgan Wortham (The London Graduate School – Kingston University) - Realism and psychosis

In ‘Judiciousness in Dispute’ Lyotard gives us an image of the seventy-four year old Kant beset by a near-permanent head cold. Here, while the mind, through a sheer effort of will, has the capacity to overcome a variety of ailments, thought nevertheless causes it severe pain, a pain to which it is not just opposed, but which indeed accompanies its very operation. To the extent that this ambivalent relationship to pain is insurmountable, the ageing philosopher’s inflammation of the head is linked to what Kant himself describes as an involuntary spasmodic state in the brain, that is, a certain inability to maintain concepts, or to secure the unified consciousness of related representations, which Lyotard wants to suggest is fundamental or necessary, rather than merely contingent upon an ailment contracted late in life. To what extent is post-Kantian thought in pain? In what ways is such ‘pain’ prolonged in philosophies that seek a radical departure from Kant? For instance, in seeking an exit from the subjective representation of objects (for Lyotard, the source of Kant’s ‘pain’)? Does speculative materialism risk a certain lapse into a psychotic state that—as both Lacan and Kristeva suggest—may be arrested only through the onset of phobia?

Introduction by Christopher Kul-Want (CSM):

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Julie Sanders – “Full of Noises”: The adaptation of Shakespeare in music

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 11th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 11 December 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Julie Sanders (Nottingham University) – “Full of Noises”: The adaptation of Shakespeare in music

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Catherine Malabou – Relinquishing the transcendental? Speculative realism in question

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 4th, 2014

Event Date: 4 December 2014
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Catherine Malabou (CRMEP, Kingston University) – Relinquishing the transcendental? Speculative realism in question

Is contemporary continental European philosophy preparing itself to break with Kant? An attack upon supposedly indestructible structures of knowledge is occurring: finitude of the subject, the phenomenal given, a priori synthesis. “Relinquishing the transcendental” is the leading project of postcritical thinking in the early twenty-first century, in particular as it appears in Quentin Meillassoux’s book After Finitude. Some questions it seemed could never be raised after the Critique of Pure Reason are reappearing with a renewed force: Was Kant genuinely able to deduce categories instead of imposing them, to prove the necessity of nature, to found the difference between “a priori” and “innate”? Should we consider, on the contrary, that the “problem of Hume”—the existence of an irreducible contingency of the world—was never settled by the Transcendental Deduction? Such a claim implies that we have provided a sufficiently convincing concept of the irregularity of the laws of nature and of the possibility of a totally different world. Does After Finitude elaborate such concepts?

Introduction by Dr Jamie Brassett (CSM):

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Adam Hansen – “I heard the sounds of long ago”: The Politics of Popular Music in Contemporary Shakespearean Performance

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 27th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 27 November 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Dr Adam Hansen (Northumbria) – “I heard the sounds of long ago”:  The Politics of Popular Music in  Contemporary Shakespearean  Performance

Introduction:

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Russell Grigg – Why Freud’s Theory of Melancholia is All Wrong

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 26th, 2014

Event Date: 26 November 2014

Room PRJG 1007
John Galsworthy Building,
Penrhyn Road Campus, Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

The London Graduate School presents:

Professor Russell Grigg (Deakin University, Australia) – Why Freud’s Theory of Melancholia is All Wrong

Russell Grigg is the author of Lacan, Language and Philosophy (SUNY, 2008) and the translator of a number of Lacan’s Seminars including Seminar III The Psychoses and Seminar XVII The Other Side of Psychoanalysis.

Introduction by Professor Scott Wilson (Kingston):

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Information about Kingston University’s MA in Psychoanalysis can be found here

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Irene Morra – Britten’s National Opera: “Gloriana” and the Shakespeare Problem

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 20th, 2014

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 20 November 2014
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream”. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Dr Irene Morra (Cardiff) – Britten’s National Opera: “Gloriana”  and the Shakespeare Problem

Introduction by Dr Helen Julia Minors (Kingston):

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