Charles Nicholl – Counterfeit Presentments: Portraits of Shakespeare and the messages they send

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 21st, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 21 April 2016
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and Trevor Nunn staged the Barton / Hall ‘Wars of the Roses’. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

The Rose Theatre Shakespeare Birthday Lecture

Charles NichollCounterfeit Presentments: Portraits of Shakespeare and the messages they send

Charles Nicholl is the author of numerous Elizabethan studies, including The Reckoning: The Murder of Christopher Marlowe, which won the James Tait Black Prize for biography, and The Lodger: Shakespeare on Silver Street. He has also written an acclaimed biography of Leonardo da Vinci, and an account of Arthur Rimbaud’s years in Africa, Somebody Else, which was awarded the Hawthornden Prize. He is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, and is currently Honorary Professor of English at Sussex.

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Paolo Diego Bubbio – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University) – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

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Bruno Haas – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Bruno Haas (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

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Myriam Bienenstock – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 16th, 2016

 

Event Date: 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Myriam Bienenstock  (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours) – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne:

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George di Giovanni – Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor George di Giovanni (McGill University) – Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

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Stefania Achella – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Stefania Achella (University of Chieti) – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

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Francois Kervégan – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 15th, 2016

 

Event Date: 14 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.

Professor Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano:

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Hegel and the Concept of World History

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on April 14th, 2016

Event Date: 14 and 15 April 2016
Anoinette Hotel,
Beaufort Road,
Kingston upon Thames KT1 2TQ

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Hegelab present:

Hegel and the Concept of World History

Objektiver Geist occupies an intermediary position in the general context of Hegel’s system. It was, however, a late “discovery” encountered in a double exteriority, both outside the subjective and separate from absolute spirit. Hegel’s passion for the objective led to numerous returns to the system’s middle term to rework and update its content. When this effort was interrupted by the philosopher’s death, the first Hegelians took up the challenge to furnish the system’s middle grounds with the philosophy of history and other posthumous fragments of teaching or early writings. If the Hegelian concept of objective spirit was developed on the grounds of history, rather than political economy, is the concept itself subject-specific? What does it cover, designate, constrain, impose, or conceptualize? Is objective spirit still to be thought there, where it imposed itself on Hegel, on the first Hegelians, and on later ones (Left, Right and Centre)? This two-day conference seeks to address questions arising from the concept of world history in relation to the form, function, and content of objective spirit as presented in the Encyclopaedia of the Philosophical Sciences and Elements of the Philosophy of Right.
Plenary speakers

  •     Stefania Achella (University of Chieti, Pescara & Ecole Normale Supérieure of Pisa)
  •     Myriam Bienenstock (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours)
  •     Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University)
  •     George di Giovanni (McGill University)
  •     Bruno Haas (University of Dresden)
  •     Jean- Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne)

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Thursday 14 April 2016

Welcome and outline of conference by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Introduction by Professor Maurizio Pagano (HegeLab, University of Eastern Piedmont):

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Keynotes:

Professor Francois Kervégan (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – ‘Philosophy of History’: Kant vs Hegel

AUDIO HERE

Professor Stefania Achella (University of Chieti) – A Hegelian Contribution to the Question of Civil Religion

AUDIO HERE

Professor George di Giovanni (McGill University) - Reason in History: on how Kojève Misled his Readers

AUDIO HERE

Discussion of Keynotes (Chair: Maurizio Pagano):

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———————————————————

Friday 15 April 2016

Professor Myriam Bienenstock  (University Francois-Rabelais, Tours) – On the Use and Abuse of Teleology in History

AUDIO HERE

Professor Bruno Haas (University of Paris I, Pantheon-Sorbonne) – The Encyclopedia’s § 548

AUDIO HERE

Professor Paolo Diego Bubbio (Western Sydney University) – The ‘I’, World History, and Collective Consciousness in Hegel

AUDIO HERE

Discussion of Keynotes (Chair: Peter Osborne):

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Francois Laroque – These late Eclipses: Shakespeare’s Uncanny Stars

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 7th, 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

Event Date: 7 April 2016
Rose Theatre,
24-26 High Street,
Kingston, KT1 1HL

 

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar

The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” and Trevor Nunn staged the Barton / Hall ‘Wars of the Roses’. But KiSS also commemorates Kingston’s historic connection with Shakespeare, which goes back to David Garrick – who lived here, and built the beautiful Shakespeare Temple beside the Thames – and to the very first royal performances of some of his greatest plays in the Great Hall at Hampton Court.

Professor Francois Laroque (Paris III) – These late Eclipses: Shakespeare’s Uncanny Stars

François Laroque is Professor of English literature at the University of Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris III. He is the author of ‘Shakespeare’s Festive World’(Cambridge: CUP, 1991), and has published several books, editions and translations on Marlowe and Shakespeare. His most recent work is a co-edition of a two-volume anthology of non Shakespearean drama (Théâtre Élisabéthain 1490-1642).

Introduction by Professor Richard Wilson (Kingston):

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Alexandre Stevens – Unlimited Enjoyments

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 17th, 2016

 

Event Date: 17 March 2016
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The MA Psychoanalysis at Kingston University, and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Alexandre StevensUnlimited Enjoyments

Introduction by Véronique Voruz (Dept. Psychoanalysis, Kingston University, London):

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