Elissa Marder – Dream and the Guillotine: Femininity, Photography and Other Scenes of Fixation

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 9th, 2014

Event Date: 9 June 2014

Bloomsbury Publishing Plc
50 Bedford Square
London, WC1B 3DP

The London Graduate School presents:

Professor Elissa Marder (Emory University) – Dream and the Guillotine:  Femininity, Photography and Other Scenes of Fixation

What is the relation between the singular unreality of the world of a dream and the guillotine, that exemplary enlightenment machine that transformed the legal administration of capital punishment into a public spectacle of the moment of death? I read these two seemingly opposed and unconnected figures through each other in order to explore how Freud’s descriptions of the formal qualities of the dream-work enter into—and complicate—our understanding of how events and actions become visible and readable in the so-called real world. The dream and the guillotine communicate with one another because they both stage scenes of a very particular kind.

The question of female sexuality both defines and undermines the category of the human for Freud.  Female sexuality both establishes the universal foundations of the metapsychology and is excluded from it.  In his short and provocative case history, “A Case of Paranoia Running Counter to the Disease” (the first devoted to a female patient after Dora), Freud introduces the notion of “primal fantasies” and links that notion to the (imagined) images of being photographed that haunt and obsess his female patient.  Freud not only associates photography with unconscious images about female sexuality produced by a female patient, but he also takes on the role of unconscious photographer by casting the woman in the place of a camera in his narrative account. By looking at the way femininity and fixation come together in this powerful text, I discuss why Freud attributes quasi-photographic powers to female sexuality as a means of trying to produce a figure for unseen and un-seeable images that come from a primal and unrecoverable past.

Introduction by Professor Martin McQuillan (Kingston):

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Ernst Bloch London Symposium

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 12th, 2013

Event Date: 12 December 2013
Lecture Theatre E002,
Granary Building
Central Saint Martin’s
University of the Arts London
London N1 4AA

The London Graduate School and  Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP), Kingston University  present:

Ernst Bloch London Symposium

The work of Ernst Bloch posits a utopian impulse that Fredric Jameson has described as ‘governing and encompassing everything, from games to patent medicines, from myths to mass entertainment, from iconography to technology, from architecture to Eros, from tourism to jokes and the unconscious’.

This one-day event, organized by the Kingston London Graduate School, with the support of CRMEP, revisits Bloch’s work in four themed panels on materialismatheismtime & aesthetics, and political economy of hope.

Programme:

Welcome by  Simon Morgan Wortham (LGS, Kingston):

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Panel 1:  Bloch Today – Contemporary Theory, Arts and Politics

Chair: Christopher Kul-Want (Central St Martin’s)

Johan Siebers (Central Lancashire/Middlesex) – Full Frontal Philosophy:

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Richard Noble (Goldsmiths) – The Political Interpretation of Utopia:

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Silvia Mazzini (Humboldt University, Berlin) – Bloch’s Objective Fantasy:

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Panel 1 Audience Questions:

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Panel 2: Materialism/Atheism

Chair: Christopher Kul-Want (Central St Martin’s)

Ana Cecilia Dinerstein (Bath) – Living in Blochian Times: The Importance of the ‘not-yet’ for Prefigurative Politics:

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Catherine Moir (Cambridge) – Bloch’s Speculative Materialism:

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Hager Weslati (Kingston) – Bloch-Kojève: Divine Non-existence:

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Panel 2 Audience Questions:

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Panel 3: Time/Aesthetics

Chair: Hager Weslati (Kingston)

Arno Münster (Amiens) – Concrete Utopia: Consciousness of Anticipation and Praxis:

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Peter Osborne (Kingston) – The Problem of a Multilayered Temporal Dialectic:

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Response by Frederic Schwartz (UCL):

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Panel 3 Audience Questions:

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Panel 4: Political Economy of Hope

Chair: Stella Sandford (Kingston)

Caitroina Ni Dhuill (Durham) – The Concentric Promiscuities of Utopia:

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Agata Bielik Robson (Nottingham)  – The Ontology of Hope:

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Peter Thompson (Sheffield) - The Future of Hope and the Metaphysics of Contingency:

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Panel 4 Audience Questions and Close:

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François Laruelle – In-the-Last-Humanity: On the “Speculative” Ecology of Man, Animal and Plant

in Academic Service - Archive by on June 3rd, 2013

Event Date: 3 June 2013

Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,

Central Saint Martins,

London N1C 4AA

Central St Martin’s and the London Graduate School present:

LARUELLE in LONDON: The LGS Seminars

Professor François LaruelleIn-the-Last-Humanity: On the “Speculative” Ecology of Man, Animal and Plant

This is the 3rd in a series of lectures Professor François Laruelle is giving at the London Graduate School, London. This talk is presented with the support of the School of Art, Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts.

Following the lecture there will be a reception and book launch for the translation of Laruelle’s Principles of Non-Philosophy, trans. Anthony Paul Smith and Nicola Rubczak (Bloomsbury, 2013).

Professor Laruelle has taught at both the University of Paris X and the Collège international de philosophie, and is a Visiting Professor at the London Graduate School, Kingston University, London. He is the author of over twenty books, including Philosophies of Difference (trans. 2010), Future Christ (trans. 2010), Principles of Non-Philosophy (trans. 2013), and, most recently, The Concept of Non-Photography (2011) and Anti-Badiou (2011, trans. 2013).

Introduction by Professor John Mullarkey (Kingston):

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Talk:

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Response by Professor John Mullarkey (Kingston):

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Discussion  – with translations by Dr Marjorie Gracieuse (Warwick):

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Simon Morgan Wortham – Auto-immune Narcissism

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 7th, 2013

Event Date: 7 March 2013

Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Professor Simon Morgan Wortham (LGS) -  Auto-immune Narcissism

For Plato, excessive sleep offends against citizenship and the polis. Kant, meanwhile, suggests that an undue propensity to sleep may give rise to premature death. Where sleepwalking is concerned, moreover, Kant finds it impossible to propose the ‘rules of conduct’ required by pragmatic anthropology. Hegel, meanwhile, considers sleepwalking an illness; and indeed an implied menace lurks deep in the heart of sleep. For if the retreat into itself of the ‘soul’ in deepest slumber seems inescapable, at the same time such a withdrawal establishes the grounds for the disorder that is somnambulism. Hegel’s own argument suggests, then, a profound sickness rooted in the inherent imbalance of sleep. Sleep is radically double-facing in Freud’s work. It serves the conscious wish to sleep and the workings of the unconscious at once, since the ability to hold down repressed material is reduced by a certain, unavoidable relaxation of energy during sleep, while at the same time dreaming expends unused energy or ‘interest’ in a way that is innocuous in terms of the wish to sleep. The difficulty of knowing in which or in whose interests one sleeps is therefore perhaps at its strongest in Freud. In ‘A Metaphysical Supplement to the Theory of Dreams’, dreaming is not just a means of wallowing in the deep narcissism shared by the ego and the libido alike; it is also a matter of tackling those unresolved psychic residues that threaten to break into and disturb the narcissistic dream. Crucially, this threat to the narcissistic indulgence of dreaming which comes from day-time remainders isn’t just a matter of external menace, because for Freud such residues acquire significance precisely to the extent that they retain a certain degree of libidinal ‘interest’. Thus, I argue, the dream sees narcissism defending itself against what are basically its own interests. For Freud, in fact, this may be what a dream is.

Talk:

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François Laruelle – The Degrowth of Philosophy: Towards a Generic Ecology

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 10th, 2012

Event Date: 10 December 2012
Swedenborg Hall
20-21 Bloomsbury Way,
London, WC1A 2TH

THE LONDON GRADUATE SCHOOL

Presents

LARUELLE in LONDON: The LGS Seminars

Professor François LaruelleThe Degrowth of Philosophy: Towards a Generic Ecology

Professor Laruelle has taught at both the University of Paris X and the Collège international de philosophie, and is a Visiting Professor at the London Graduate School, Kingston University. He is the author of over twenty books, including Les philosophies de la différence (1986), Principes de la non-philosophie (1996), Le Christ futur (2002), and, most recently, Le Concept de non-photographie and Anti-Badiou (both 2011) – all of which have either just appeared or will soon appear in English translation. A number of collections of new essays on Laruelle will also appear this year.

Over this forty year period, Laruelle has constructed one of the most demanding, methodical, and provocative intellectual practices in contemporary theory – an absolutely immanent materialism of thought. The purpose of these series of talks at the LGS will be both to cover the conceptual background to Non-Standard Philosophy and to explore its consequences for theory throughout the arts, sciences, and humanities.

Introduction by Professor John Mullarkey (Kingston).

Talk:

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5 Comments

Martin Hägglund – Dying For Time: From Plato to T.S. Eliot

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 25th, 2012

 

Event Date: 25  October 2012
Swedenborg Hall
Swedenborg Society
20-21 Bloomsbury Way
London WC1

The London Graduate School  and the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) present:

Professor Martin Hägglund (Yale University) – Dying For Time: From Plato to T.S. Eliot

Introduction by Professor Simon Morgan Wortham (Kingston).

Talk:

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Questions:

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accompanying images:

Buy Martin Hägglund’s Dying for Time here

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David Wood – Reversals and Transformations: Towards a Deconstructive Phenomenology

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 17th, 2012

 

 

Event Date: 17  October 2012
Wynter Room
Swedenborg Society
20-21 Bloomsbury Way
London WC1

The London Graduate School presents:

Professor David Wood (Vanderbilt University) – Reversals and Transformations: Towards a Deconstructive Phenomenology

Introduction by Professor John Mullarkey (Kingston).

Talk:

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You can buy David Wood’s  Deconstruction of Time here

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Andrew Benjamin – On Hands: Philosophy and Art’s History

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 11th, 2012

 

 

Event Date: 11 October 2012
Clattern Lecture Theatre
Kingston University
Penrhyn Road
Kingston upon Thames
KT1 2EE

The London Graduate School presents:

Inaugural Lecture:

Professor Andrew Benjamin (Kingston University, London/Monash University) – On Hands: Philosophy and Art’s History

Introduction .

Lecture:

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Catherine Malabou (Kingston):

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Accompanying Images

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Film-Philosophy Conference 2012

in Academic Service - Archive, conference by on September 12th, 2012

 

 

Event Date 12 – 14  September 2012
Queen Mary University of London,
King’s College London and Kingston University

The London Graduate School  presents:

Film-Philosophy Conference 2012

Film-philosophy continues to grow as an important discipline within the fields of both Film Studies and Philosophy. The Film-Philosophy Conference brings together scholars from all over the world to present their research on a broad range of topics within the subject area.

The 2012 conference will take place September 12-14, and will be jointly hosted by King’s College London, Queen Mary, University of London and Kingston University.

Keynote Speakers:

  •     Bernard Stiegler (Goldsmiths, University of London;  University of Technology of Compiègne)  and
  •     Ken McMullen (Director of Ghost Dance)                    AUDIO HERE
  •     Francesco Casetti (Yale University)                              AUDIO HERE
  •     Damian Sutton (Middlesex University)                        AUDIO HERE
  •     Libby Saxton (Queen Mary, University of London)   AUDIO HERE
2 Comments

SEP-FEP 2012 conference

in Academic Service - Archive by on September 5th, 2012

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Event Date: 5 – 7 September 2012
Manchester Metropolitan University,
All Saints Building, All Saints,
Manchester, M15 6BH

The Society for European Philosophy (SEP) and the Forum for European Philosophy (FEP) 2012 Conference

in association with The London Graduate School

The Society for European Philosophy (SEP) aims to provide a forum for research and teaching in all areas of European philosophy, broadly construed. It provides an opportunity for scholars from any country, and any discipline, to come together and share ideas. Since 1997, the SEP conference has been an important annual event for faculty, post-graduate students and independent scholars of European philosophy throughout the world. Since 2005 the SEP annual conference has been run jointly with the Forum for European Philosophy (FEP), helping to make the three-day conference the largest event of its kind in Europe. This year the joint conference will also run in association with the London Graduate School.

The four keynote events will be recorded and are available here soon after the conference.

Keynote speakers:

Catherine MalabouIt does not have to be like this

AUDIO HERE

Plenary Panel Session:  New materialities, other deconstructions
Catherine Malabou, Martin McQuillan, Simon Morgan Wortham

AUDIO HERE

Alphonso LingisThe return of subjectivity

AUDIO HERE

Shaun Gallagher – What can phenomenology tell us about social cognition?

AUDIO HERE

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