Alenka Zupančič – Power in the Closet (And Its Coming Out)

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 21st, 2015

 

Event Date: 21 May 2015
JG Room 0001
Penrhyn Road Campus,
Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Alenka Zupančič (Institute of Philosophy, Slovenian Academy of Sciences and Arts, Ljubljana) – Power in the Closet (And Its Coming Out)

This is the keynote lecture from CRMEP’s 2015 Graduate Student conference ‘Philosophy, Power, Potentialities’

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Sacha Golob – Self-Knowledge, Agency and Self-Authorship

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 18th, 2015

Event Date: 18 May 2015
Room 349
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Sacha Golob ((KCL) – Self-Knowledge, Agency and Self-Authorship

Sacha Golob is a Lecturer in Philosophy at King’s College London; prior to that he was a Research Fellow at Peterhouse, Cambridge. His research focuses on the intersection between the history of philosophy and contemporary philosophy of mind, action and ethics. He is the author of Heidegger on Concepts, Freedom and Normativity (CUP 2014), and the editor of the forthcoming Cambridge History of Moral Philosophy (CUP 2016).

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Simon Prosser – Why are Indexicals Essential?

in Academic Service - Archive by on May 11th, 2015

Event Date: 11 May 2015
Room 349
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Simon Prosser (St Andrews) – Why are Indexicals Essential?

Simon Prosser is Senior Lecturer in Philosophy at the University of St Andrews. His main research interests are in the philosophy of mind and in metaphysics. He has published articles on temporal experience, intentionalism about conscious experience, indexical thoughts, the metaphysics of time, and emergent properties. He is currently adding the finishing touches to a monograph on the experience of time and change, and also writing a couple of papers on the individuation of concepts. In the future he plans to write more about the nature of conscious experience.

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Andrew Goffey – Guattari: Theories and Institutions

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 30th, 2015

Event Date: 30 April 2015
JG5002,
Penrhyn Road Campus,
Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Dr Andrew Goffey (Nottingham) – Guattari: Theories and Institutions

Andrew Goffey is Associate Professor of Critical Theory and Cultural Studies at the University of Nottingham. He is the coeditor, with Éric Alliez, of The Guattari Effect and the translator of Isabelle Stengers and Philippe Pignarre’s Capitalist Sorcery, of Félix Guattari’s Schizoanalytic Cartographies, and of work by Maurizio Lazzarato, Barbara Cassin, and Etienne Balibar. He is also coeditor of the journal Computational Culture.

Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Christoph Hoerl – Writing on the Page of Consciousness

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 27th, 2015

Event Date: 27 April 2015
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Christoph Hoerl (Warwick) – Writing on the Page of Consciousness

Christoph Hoerl is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Warwick. His research is mainly in the philosophy of mind, with a particular interest in philosophical questions about the nature of temporal experience, memory, and our ability to think about time.

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Stella Sandford – The Long Passage: Sex and Race in the History of Philosophy

in Academic Service - Archive by on April 22nd, 2015

 

Event Date: 22 April 2015
Clattern Lecture Theatre,
Penrhyn Road Campus,
Penrhyn Road,
Kingston upon Thames,
Surrey KT1 2EE

Kingston University and the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) present:

Inaugural Lecture:

Professor Stella Sandford (CRMEP) – The Long Passage: Sex and Race in the History of Philosophy

Introduction by Professor Martin McQuillan (Dean, FASS, Kingston):

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Vote of Thanks by Professor Mandy Merck (RHUL):

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Peter Hallward – Re-educating the Educator

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 26th, 2015

Event Date: 12 March 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

Professor Peter Hallward (Kingston) – Re-educating the Educator

Introduction by Dr Dean Kenning (CSM):

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Stella Sandford – The Sex of Natural History

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 12th, 2015

Event Date: 12 March 2015
Lecture Theatre E002, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) and the London Graduate School in collaboration with Art and Philosophy at Central Saint Martins present:

A Lecture of the Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy’s 20th Anniversary Public Lecture Series, in association with the London Graduate School.

Professor Stella Sandford (CRMEP, Kingston University) – The Sex of Natural History

Introduction by Dr Kamini Vellodi (CSM):

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Rosi Braidotti – Vectors of Affirmation

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 10th, 2015

 

Event Date: 10 March 2015
Room C303, Granary Building,
Central Saint Martins,
London N1C 4AA

 

 

 

The London Graduate School presents:

The 2015 London Graduate School Bloomsbury Lecture

Professor Rosi Braidotti (Utrecht) – Vectors of Affirmation

Prof. Braidotti received a doctoral degree in philosophy from the Sorbonne in 1981, and has taught at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands since 1988, when she was appointed as the founding professor in women’s studies. In 1995 she became the founding Director of the Netherlands research school of Women’s Studies. Braidotti founded the inter-university SOCRATES network NOISE and the Thematic Network for Women’s Studies ATHENA, and has held many prestigious visiting positions including Leverhulme Trust Visiting Professor at Birkbeck College in 2005-6, a Jean Monnet professor at the European University Institute in Florence in 2002-3 and a fellow in the school of Social Science at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton in 1994. Braidotti is currently Distinguished University Professor at Utrecht University and founding Director of the Centre for the Humanities.

Braidotti’s publications have consistently been placed in continental philosophy, at the intersection with social and political theory, cultural politics, gender, feminist theory and ethnicity studies. The core of her interdisciplinary work consists of four interconnected monographs on the constitution of contemporary subjectivity, with special emphasis on the concept of difference within the history of European philosophy and political theory. Braidotti’s philosophical project investigates how to think difference positively, which means moving beyond the dialectics that both opposes it and thus links it by negation to the notion of sameness. This is evidenced in the philosophical agenda set in her first book Patterns of Dissonance: An Essay on Women in Contemporary French Philosophy, 1991, which gets developed further in the trilogy that follows. In the next book, Nomadic Subjects: Embodiment and Difference in Contemporary Feminist Theory, 1994 (second edition, revised and expanded, 2011), the question is formulated in more concrete terms: can gender, ethnic, cultural or European differences be understood outside the straightjacket of hierarchy and binary opposition? Thus the following volume, Metamorphoses: Towards a Materialist Theory of Becoming, 2002, analyses not only gender differences, but also more categorical binary distinctions between self and other, European and foreign, human and non-human (animal/ environmental/ technological others). The conclusion is that a systematic ambivalence structures contemporary cultural representations of the globalised, technologically mediated, ethnically mixed, gender-aware world we now inhabit. The question consequently arises of what it takes to produce adequate cultural and political representations of a fast-changing world and move closer to Spinozist notions of adequate understanding. The ethical dimension of Braidotti’s work on difference comes to the fore in the last volume of the trilogy, Transpositions: On Nomadic Ethics, 2006. Here she surveys the different ethical approaches that can be produced by taking difference and diversity as the main point of reference and conclude that there is much to be gained by suspending belief that political participation, moral empathy and social cohesion can only be produced on the basis of the notion of recognition of sameness. Braidotti makes a case for an alternative view on subjectivity, ethics and emancipation and pitches diversity against the postmodernist risk of cultural relativism while also standing against the tenets of liberal individualism. Throughout her work, Braidotti asserts and demonstrates the importance of combining theoretical concerns with a serious commitment to producing socially and politically relevant scholarship that contributes to making a difference in the world. Braidotti’s output also included several edited volumes. Her work has been translated in more than 20 languages and all the main books in at least three languages other than English.

Introduction by Professor Tina Chanter (Kingston):

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Matthew Chrisman – Knowing What One Ought To Do

in Academic Service - Archive by on March 9th, 2015

Event Date: 9 March 2015
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Matthew Chrisman (Edinburgh) – Knowing What One Ought To Do

Matthew Chrisman is a Reader in Philosophy at the University of Edinburgh. His research has focused on ethical theory, the philosophy of language, and epistemology. He has published widely in these areas, including articles in the Journal of Philosophy, the Australasian Journal of Philosophy, Oxford Studies in Metaethics, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, Philosophers’ Imprint and Philosophical Studies. Recent papers have been on the meaning of moral terms, the semantics of deontic modals, and the nature of epistemic normativity. He is one of the lead authors of Philosophy for Everyone (Routledge 2014). His research monograph The Meaning of ‘Ought’: Beyond Descriptivism and Expressivism in Metaethics will be published with Oxford University Press. He is co-editing a collection on Deontic Modality for Oxford University Press. His textbook What Is This Thing Called Metaethics? is under contract at Routledge.

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