Catherine Malabou – Spinoza and Symbolic Necessity

in Academic Service - Archive by on December 1st, 2016

 

Event Date: 1 December 2016

Chelsea Lecture Theatre
University of the Arts London
John Islip Street
London, SW1P 4JU

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Catherine Malabou (Kingston) – Spinoza and Symbolic Necessity

In Expressionism in Philosophy: Spinoza, Gilles Deleuze contrasts philosophy and revelation. Expressionism is the privileged modality of immanence and intelligibility, opposed to ‘knowledge by signs’ that characterizes the domain of revelation and is supposedly meant to foster faith in ignorant people. The ontological dimension of revelation – that is, its necessity – is dismissed by Deleuze’s reading. Emmanuel Lévinas, following an apparently inverted logic, reproaches Spinoza for having subjected revelation to an overly rigid ontological necessity, thus missing its ‘signifying’ value. Do we find too many or too few signs in Spinoza?  By focusing on Spinoza’s method of interpretation, Catherine will challenge these approaches, showing how the issue of the symbolic inscribes itself in Spinoza’s project, and offering her own account of the symbolic.

Introduction by Dr Sheena Calvert (UAL):

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Charles Forsdick – Exoticism as Keyword

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 30th, 2016

Event Date: 30 November 2016

Gowar & Wedderburn Common Room

Royal Holloway University of London
Egham, Surrey
TW20 0EX

The Humanities and Arts Research Centre at Royal Holloway University of London presents:

Professor Charles Forsdick (James Barrow Professor of French and AHRC Theme Leadership Fellow for Translating Cultures, University of Liverpool) – Exoticism as Keyword

Professor Charles Forsdick, James Barrow Professor of French and AHRC Theme Leadership Fellow for Translating Cultures, University of Liverpool, ‘Exoticism as Keyword’
Although absent from Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society (1976) and also from the revised version of the text, New Keywords: A Revised Vocabulary of Culture and Society (2005), exoticism seems to lend itself to the approach proposed by Raymond Williams: i.e., the term may be seen to exemplify the understanding of the ‘keyword’ as part of ‘a vocabulary to use, to ?nd our ways in, to change as we ?nd it necessary to change it, as we go on making our own language and history’. Central to such an approach is an awareness of the (un)translatability of exoticism, the meanings of which in an Anglophone context are very different from those in the French-speaking world. Engaging initially with the emergence and evolution of the concept of exotisme in the work of Victor Segalen, the paper will consider the term as a ‘keyword’ that has evolved across the twentieth century and, despite the ideological and theoretical challenges to which it has been subject, persisted into the twenty-first. I will explore the understandings of Segalenian exoticism that have emerged from the selected fragments of the Essai sur l’exotisme currently available in a published form, and track the ways in which these have formed the basis of dialogues with a range of key thinkers and writers including Jean Baudrillard, Patrick Chamoiseau, James Clifford and, perhaps most significantly, Edouard Glissant. The paper concludes with a reflection on the status of exoticism as a concept in a postcolonial frame, and explores its persistence in a number of recent studies across a range of disciplinary fields.

Introduction by Professor Daniela Berghahn (RHUL):

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James Studd – Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 28th, 2016

Event Date: 28 November 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr James Studd (Oxford) – Generality, Extensibility, and Paradox

James Studd is the University Lecturer in the Philosophy of Mathematics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow and Tutor at Lady Margaret Hall. In addition to the philosophy of mathematics, he works on the philosophy of logic, with occasional forays into the philosophy of language and metaphysics. He is currently writing a book about absolute generality (forthcoming with OUP).

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Nikolas Kompridis – Agency: Human and Non-Human

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 22nd, 2016


Event Date: 22 November 2016

Room 101
30 Russell Square
Birkbeck, University of London
London WC1B 5DQ

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Professor Nikolas Kompridis (Institute of Social Justice)  – Agency: Human and Non-Human

Recent discussions of non-human agency – the agency of “things” or of “actants” – have challenged the putative differences between human and non-human agency. But an insufficiently questioned picture of human agency continues to undermine attempts to make sense of non-human agency, and to think anew the relation between human and non-human agency, a task which has become all the more urgent as we come to grips with the Anthropocene.  In this paper, Professor Kompridis proposes an alternative conception of agency that better captures what is distinctive to both human and non-human agency.

Nikolas Kompridis is Research Professor in Philosophy and Political Thought and Director of the Institute for Social Justice. He is the author of The Aesthetic Turn in Political Thought (Bloomsbury, 2014) Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future (MIT, 2006), Philosophical Romanticism (Routledge, 2006), and over 50 articles on a very broad spectrum of topics in philosophy and political theory.

Originally trained as a musician (the University of Toronto and Yale University), he was the founder and director of the Canadian new music ensemble, Sound Pressure, during which time he worked with some of the world’s leading composers – Frederic Rzewski, Martin Bresnick, Louis Andriessen, and David Lang, among others. After a decade long-career in music he was drawn into an academic career, inspired by the Critical Theory tradition, which eventually took him to Frankfurt, where he worked with Jürgen Habermas as a postdoctoral fellow in the philosophy department at J.W. Goethe University. Drawing on the traditions of Critical Theory, Political Theory, Philosophical Romanticism, and American Pragmatism, his work has been concerned with rethinking the meaning of reason, critique, normativity, and agency from the perspective of his conceptions of “reflective disclosure” and “receptivity” (in Critique and Disclosure: Critical Theory between Past and Future, and other writings). This larger project also involves rethinking democratic practices of collective self-reflection and democratic practices of institutional and cultural change.

He is currently completing two new books, Critique and Receptivity, and, Romanticism, Skepticism, and Philosophy. Among his future projects is an ambitious rethinking of what it means to be human in the age of the Anthropocene, beyond the limitations of both humanism and posthumanism. Other projects include a book on the philosophy of music (after Adorno) and a book on the filmmaker, Jean-Luc Godard.

Chair: Professor Jacqueline Rose (Birkbeck)

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Howard Caygill – Aesthetics and Madness

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 17th, 2016

 

Event Date: 17 November 2016

Chelsea Lecture Theatre
University of the Arts London
John Islip Street
London, SW1P 4JU

The Centre for Research in Modern European Philosophy (CRMEP) presents:

Professor Howard Caygill (Kingston) – Aesthetics and Madness

How did the work of artists incarcerated in mental hospitals at the beginning of the 20th century escape confinement, to play an important role in the pre- and post-war artworlds? This lecture will explore the conjuncture of diagnostics, record keeping and philosophical redefintions of art and creativity that temporarily opened a route out of the asylum and into the gallery and art market.

Welcome by Professor Malcolm Quinn (UAL):

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Introduction by Professor Peter Osborne (Kingston):

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Beth Lord – Disagreement in the Political Philosophy of Spinoza and Rancière

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 14th, 2016

Event Date: 14 November 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Beth Lord (Aberdeen) – Disagreement in the Political Philosophy of Spinoza and Rancière

Beth Lord is Reader in Philosophy at the University of Aberdeen. She works on history of philosophy in the continental tradition, with a particular focus on Spinoza. Currently she is researching the concept of equality in Spinoza’s texts from its geometrical origins to its metaphysical and political uses. She recently led a three-year AHRC-funded research project that investigated the relevance of Spinoza’s concepts of ratio and equality to housing design. She is co-author (with Peg Rawes, Bartlett School of Architecture) of a short, open-access film on Spinoza and the UK housing crisis, Equal by Design, and editor of the forthcoming collection Spinoza’s Philosophy of Ratio. Her earlier books include Spinoza’s Ethics: An Edinburgh Philosophical Guide, and Kant and Spinozism: Transcendental Idealism and Immanence from Jacobi to Deleuze. She has been at Aberdeen since 2013; prior to that she worked at the University of Dundee (2004-12), and received her PhD from the University of Warwick in 2004.

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Slavoj Žižek – Masterclass 3: Between Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 2nd, 2016


Event Date: 2 November 2016

Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Masterclass 3: The Prospect of the Post-Human


Slavoj Žižek (International Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities) – The Prospect of the Post-Human

In the entire span of his teaching, Lacan was engaged in an intense debate with philosophy and philosophers, from ancient Greek materialists to Plato, from Stoics to Thomas Acquinas, from Descartes to Spinoza, from Kant to Hegel, from Marx to Kierkegaard, from Heidegger to Kripke. It is through the reference to philosophers that Lacan deploys his fundamental concepts: transference through Plato, the Freudian subject through Descartes’s cogito, surplus-enjoyment through Marx’s surplus-value, anxiety and repetition through Kierkegaard, the ethics of psychoanalysis through Kant, etc. Through this continuous engagement, Lacan is of course distancing himself from philosophy; however, all his desperate attempts to draw the line of separation again and again re-assert his commitment to philosophy – as if the only way for him to delineate the basic concepts of psychoanalysis is through a philosophical detour. Although psychoanalysis is not philosophy, its subversive dimension is grounded in the fact that it is not simply a particular science or practice but has radical consequences for philosophy: psychoanalysis is a “no” to philosophy that is internal to it, i.e., psychoanalytic theory refers to a gap/antagonism which philosophy blurs but which simultaneously grounds philosophy (Heidegger called this gap ontological difference). Without this link to philosophy – more precisely, to the blind spot of philosophy, to what is “primordially repressed” in philosophy – psychoanalysis loses its subversive dimension and becomes just another ontic practice.

Masterclass 1 – Lacan’s Hypothesis: Psychoanalysis as the Ex-Timate Core of Philosophy

Masterclass 2 – Is it Possible to Move Beyond the Transcendental?

Masterclass 3 – The Prospect of the Post-Human

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Slavoj Žižek – Masterclass 2: Between Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

in Academic Service - Archive by on November 1st, 2016


Event Date: 1 November 2016

Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Masterclass 2: Is it Possible to Move Beyond the Transcendental?


Slavoj Žižek (International Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities) – Is it Possible to Move Beyond the Transcendental?

with a contribution from  Dr  Frank Ruda (Free University, Berlin)

In the entire span of his teaching, Lacan was engaged in an intense debate with philosophy and philosophers, from ancient Greek materialists to Plato, from Stoics to Thomas Acquinas, from Descartes to Spinoza, from Kant to Hegel, from Marx to Kierkegaard, from Heidegger to Kripke. It is through the reference to philosophers that Lacan deploys his fundamental concepts: transference through Plato, the Freudian subject through Descartes’s cogito, surplus-enjoyment through Marx’s surplus-value, anxiety and repetition through Kierkegaard, the ethics of psychoanalysis through Kant, etc. Through this continuous engagement, Lacan is of course distancing himself from philosophy; however, all his desperate attempts to draw the line of separation again and again re-assert his commitment to philosophy – as if the only way for him to delineate the basic concepts of psychoanalysis is through a philosophical detour. Although psychoanalysis is not philosophy, its subversive dimension is grounded in the fact that it is not simply a particular science or practice but has radical consequences for philosophy: psychoanalysis is a “no” to philosophy that is internal to it, i.e., psychoanalytic theory refers to a gap/antagonism which philosophy blurs but which simultaneously grounds philosophy (Heidegger called this gap ontological difference). Without this link to philosophy – more precisely, to the blind spot of philosophy, to what is “primordially repressed” in philosophy – psychoanalysis loses its subversive dimension and becomes just another ontic practice.

Masterclass 1 – Lacan’s Hypothesis: Psychoanalysis as the Ex-Timate Core of Philosophy

Masterclass 2 – Is it Possible to Move Beyond the Transcendental?
with a contribution from  Dr  Frank Ruda (Free University, Berlin)

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Masterclass 3 – The Prospect of the Post-Human

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Elizabeth Cripps – Justice, Integrity and Moral Community

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 31st, 2016

Event Date: 31 October 2016
Room 22/26
Senate House
University of London
London WC1E 7HU

The Aristotelian Society presents:

Dr Elizabeth Cripps (Edinburgh) – Justice, Integrity and Moral Community: Do parents owe it to their children to bring them up as good global climate citizens?

Elizabeth Cripps is a senior lecturer in political theory at the University of Edinburgh. She is the author of Climate Change and the Moral Agent: Individual Duties in an Interdependent World (Oxford, 2013), which defends a ‘weakly collective’ moral duty to act on climate change and explores the implications for individual duties. She currently works on population, climate change and justice, and on the intersect between climate duties and parents’ duties to their children.

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Slavoj Žižek – Masterclass 1: Between Philosophy and Psychoanalysis

in Academic Service - Archive by on October 31st, 2016


Event Date: 31 October 2016

Room B34
Birkbeck Main Building
Birkbeck, University of London
Torrington Square
London WC1E 7HX

The Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities presents:

Masterclass 1: Lacan’s Hypothesis: Psychoanalysis as the Ex-Timate Core of Philosophy


Slavoj Žižek (International Director, Birkbeck Institute for the Humanities) -  Lacan’s Hypothesis: Psychoanalysis as the Ex-Timate Core of Philosophy

In the entire span of his teaching, Lacan was engaged in an intense debate with philosophy and philosophers, from ancient Greek materialists to Plato, from Stoics to Thomas Acquinas, from Descartes to Spinoza, from Kant to Hegel, from Marx to Kierkegaard, from Heidegger to Kripke. It is through the reference to philosophers that Lacan deploys his fundamental concepts: transference through Plato, the Freudian subject through Descartes’s cogito, surplus-enjoyment through Marx’s surplus-value, anxiety and repetition through Kierkegaard, the ethics of psychoanalysis through Kant, etc. Through this continuous engagement, Lacan is of course distancing himself from philosophy; however, all his desperate attempts to draw the line of separation again and again re-assert his commitment to philosophy – as if the only way for him to delineate the basic concepts of psychoanalysis is through a philosophical detour. Although psychoanalysis is not philosophy, its subversive dimension is grounded in the fact that it is not simply a particular science or practice but has radical consequences for philosophy: psychoanalysis is a “no” to philosophy that is internal to it, i.e., psychoanalytic theory refers to a gap/antagonism which philosophy blurs but which simultaneously grounds philosophy (Heidegger called this gap ontological difference). Without this link to philosophy – more precisely, to the blind spot of philosophy, to what is “primordially repressed” in philosophy – psychoanalysis loses its subversive dimension and becomes just another ontic practice.

Masterclass 1 – Lacan’s Hypothesis: Psychoanalysis as the Ex-Timate Core of Philosophy

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Masterclass 2 – Is it Possible to Move Beyond the Transcendental?

Masterclass 3 – The Prospect of the Post-Human

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