Tony Ageh – The BBC and a Digital Public Sphere

The BBC’s charter is due for renewal soon after the General Election. Licence fee funded public service broadcasting is again being questioned. Tony Ageh OBE, BBC’s Controller of Archive, will outline how the BBC’s huge archive of programmes can be used to enhance the BBC’s public service role.

Kiran Klaus Patel – The New Deal: A Global History

This presentation summarizes some of the findings of my forthcoming book with the same title (America in the world series; Princeton University Press, planned for fall 2015). How does the reaction of the United States compare to the way other societies reacted to the Great Depression and other challenges of the time? And which links did the New Deal make and unmake? In the talk, I will speak about the book’s conceptual basis as well as some of its empirical findings.

Sophie Gibb – Defending Dualism

Sophie Gibb is Senior Lecturer at the Department of Philosophy, Durham University. Her research is in metaphysics and the philosophy of mind, with particular interests in the mental causation debate, the categories of being, and causation, laws and powers.

Stephen Downes – On the Musically Sentimental: from Chopin to Barry Manilow

Sentimentalism has been a neglected, even derided notion in romantic music but this talk argues that it is a crucial aspect of some of the finest music of the 19th century. This will be exemplified, at the piano, by extracts from Chopin. The talk will also demonstrate an aspect of the legacy of romantic sentimentalism through considering Barry Manilow’s 1970s power ballad, Could it be Magic.

More than Accessible: Theatre and Performance in the Age of the Spectator

The aim of this one-day symposium is to ask interesting questions about present assumptions to do with cultivating, responding to and retaining an audience for performance work. The rush to make digital all relations between spectator and performer, venue and company, has hemmed in potentially more elastic and considered responses.

The Black Sea in the Socialist World

The aim of this one-day symposium is to ask interesting questions about present assumptions to do with cultivating, responding to and retaining an audience for performance work. The rush to make digital all relations between spectator and performer, venue and company, has hemmed in potentially more elastic and considered responses. By quantifying immediate feedback and shaping response into small bits tweetable or facebookable, performance makers and venues for performances risk participating in the very real damage caused by volume: too much, too fast, too immediate also means responses drown under the next request for feedback, easily deleted, easily forgotten.

Graham Holderness – Hamnet Shakespeare: A Joycean Life

            Event Date: 5 February 2015 Rose Theatre, 24-26 High Street, Kingston, KT1 1HL   The Kingston Shakespeare Seminars The Kingston Shakespeare Seminar (KiSS) brings leading Shakespeare scholars to the Rose, which the director Peter Hall created to be a “teaching theatre”. Here Sir Peter directed Dame Judi Dench in a celebrated production of “A …