Nicolas Derasse – The Prison Administration in Morocco under the Era of the French Protectorate: The Improbable Control of an Institution

 

Event Dates: 13 – 16 September 2015
College Court Conference Centre
Knighton Road,
Leicester LE2 3UF

The Carceral Archipelago: Transnational Circulations in Global Perspective, 1415-1960

Nicolas Derasse (Lille 2 University) – The Prison Administration in Morocco under the Era of the French Protectorate: The Improbable Control of an Institution

When the French Protectorate is established in Morocco by the Treaty of Fes in March 1912, the occupying country decides to initiate reform of the justice whose mission is to improve the functioning of indigenous institutions. In the penitentiary domain, the objective of France is to impliment a prison system and conditions of detention close to those observed in Metropole. Three years later, this political will becomes a reality by realization of an ambitious project of construction of building new detention facilities which will come to complete the prison housing stock deemed antiquated Morocco. The intention of the colonizing country is certainly to impose its prison rules to better assure its internal security policy but also to preserve a number of local prison practices to better assimilate the Moroccan population and its leaders. The proposed paper will allow to return to this establishment of the French Penitentiary model and its specificities during all the phase of the Protectorate which, lets us reminds it, will end in 1956 with the proclamation of independence of Morocco. It will lead to show the limits of the judicial cohabitation in a politically sensitive environment, driven by the actions and claims of the nationalists. If the prison institution in Morocco has undoubtedly knew some progress, issues related to the independence of the country very quickly took over and forced the French prison authorities to cede valuable ground for hope to be able to manage the prisons of the territory.

Play

<<back to conference page>>

share this entry: