Jerry Brotton – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

Event Date: 16 June 2016

Royal Geographical Society
Education Centre/Main Hall
1 Kensington Gore,
London SW7 2AR

 The Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities presents:

The Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities

Professor Jerry Brotton (QMUL) – This Orient Isle: The Cultural Geography of Elizabethan England and the Islamic World

This event celebrated the launch of the new Royal Holloway Centre for the GeoHumanities with the inauguration of a new lecture series, the Denis Cosgrove Lecture in the GeoHumanities. The Centre is a major interdisciplinary initiative cultivating links between arts and humanities scholars and practitioners, geographers and the creative, cultural and heritage sectors. It focuses in particular on five cross-cutting interdisciplinary themes:
•       The Environmental GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities scholarship on environment, nature and environmental change;
•       The Creative GeoHumanities, encompassing practice-based arts research engaging themes of place, space, landscape and environment;
•       The Spatial GeoHumanities, encompassing arts and humanities research on imaginative geographies and the production of space, past and present;
•       The Digital GeoHumanities, including the use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), geo-coded data and digital mapping within arts and humanities scholarship;
•       The Public GeoHumanities, encompassing the place-based and spatial understandings of the cultural, creative and heritage sectors as well as community and participatory work.

The Denis Cosgrove lecture series will be a regular part of the Centre’s programming. The inaugural lecture was given by Professor Jerry Brotton, School of English and Drama, QMUL. Professor Philip Crang and Dr Harriet Hawkins, Co-Directors of the Centre, introduced the event. Professor Stephen Daniels, School of Geography, University of Nottingham, offered the response.

Welcome by Professor Phil Crang  (RHUL):

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Introduction by Dr Harriet Hawkins (RHUL):

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Lecture:

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Response by Professor Stephen Daniels (Nottingham):

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